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Author Topic: Best Films of All Time
Shane
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posted 30 August 2004 03:29 PM      Profile for Shane     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
What do babblers consider to be the best films of all time?

I'll start with a list of my favourites (in this order ):

1. The Godfather (1972)
2. The Godfather Part II (1974)
3. The Godfather Part III (1990)
4. Schindler's List (1993)
5. Shawshank Redemption (1994)
6. Forrest Gump (1993)
7. Dances With Wolves (1990)
8. JFK (1991)
9. American History X (1998)
10. A Clockwork Orange (1971)

I'm sure I've forgotten some.


From: Ontario | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
paxamillion
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posted 30 August 2004 03:48 PM      Profile for paxamillion   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
1. Casablanca (1942).
2. Casablanca (1942).
3. Casablanca (1942).

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jeff house
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posted 30 August 2004 03:49 PM      Profile for jeff house     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Shane forgot "Shane".
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thwap
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posted 30 August 2004 03:50 PM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It just can't be the best movie of all time, but I can't stop loving "The Big Lebowski."

Fellini's "La Dolca Vita" really moved me the first time that I saw it.

Which reminds me; I was hung-over and depressed when I watched the Cohen brothers' other classic, "Fargo." People found it funny, I found it horrifying.

"Search and Destroy" with Walken, Hopper, Turturro, in (supporting roles) is great.

I think "Raging Bull" is my favourite Scorcese film.

See if you can watch "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn" without sniffling at the end.

I really don't know any awesome undiscovered gems, so I'll stop right now.

[ 30 August 2004: Message edited by: thwap ]


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Screaming Lord Byron
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posted 30 August 2004 03:52 PM      Profile for Screaming Lord Byron     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm not qualified to do it, but for a personal list of ten in no particular order.

Withnail and I
Wings of Desire
Henry Fool
24 Hour Party People
Bedazzled (the original)
The Wicker Man
Dead Man
Manhattan
Performance
Clerks


From: Calgary | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Shane
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posted 30 August 2004 03:52 PM      Profile for Shane     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by jeff house:
Shane forgot "Shane".

Was tempted to put it there but I didn't really like it.


From: Ontario | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
Shane
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posted 30 August 2004 03:53 PM      Profile for Shane     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Screaming Lord Byron:
I'm not qualified to do it, but for a personal list of ten in no particular order.

Withnail and I
Wings of Desire
Henry Fool
24 Hour Party People
Bedazzled (the original)
The Wicker Man
Dead Man
Manhattan
Performance
Clerks


No Godfather? What's wrong with you?


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Screaming Lord Byron
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posted 30 August 2004 03:55 PM      Profile for Screaming Lord Byron     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Like I say, my personal 10. I actually can't sit through the Godfather. I know it's all very good, but it doesn't grab me.
From: Calgary | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Shane
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posted 30 August 2004 04:00 PM      Profile for Shane     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Screaming Lord Byron:
Like I say, my personal 10. I actually can't sit through the Godfather. I know it's all very good, but it doesn't grab me.

I have a hard time sitting through a lot of movies, actually. Most recently "Cold Mountain". I watched it for about 20 minutes and couldn't handle it anymore. I had an Elaine Benes-esque reaction to that one.

The first time I saw 'The Godfather' was about 6 months ago. And it's one of the few series of movies that I actually was excited to see the sequels.

[ 30 August 2004: Message edited by: Shane ]


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Michelle
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posted 30 August 2004 04:07 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I can't do these lists. I usually like most things unless they sucked big time. And I'm always afraid to list my favorites in case they're really uncool. And actually, I don't really have many favorites. Usually, like with music, my favorites are the ones that I've grooved on recently.
From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
thwap
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posted 30 August 2004 04:08 PM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Ah yes, "Wings of Desire." I fell in love with the trapeze artist. (Though when her and the angel finally spoke to each other in the bar I was like; "Just jump each other already.")

"Henry Fool" ... liked it very much, very good movie. (Though women seemed to have 'supporting roles' as part of their genetic make-up in that one.)

"Dead Man" ... loved the hell out of it: "It looks like a god-damned religious icon.." [squish!]

"Manhattan" ... beautiful, so is "Hannah and Her Sisters." (didn't like the sequel: 'Hannah and her 16-year old adopted daughter' [stolen joke])

"Withnail and I" ... funny, but is it homophobic? I'm pretty sure now that it is.

Hey wait!! Howcum nobody's saying "The Song Remains The Same"?!?!?!?


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Screaming Lord Byron
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posted 30 August 2004 04:13 PM      Profile for Screaming Lord Byron     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Withnail and I treads a fine line on homophobia, but I think Monty is essentially a sympathetic character, and the comedy is of misunderstanding. After all, Withnail has promised Marwood to Monty in return for the use of his cottage.

As for the trapeze artist in Wings of Desire, she was stunning. I fell for her at an early, impressionable age.


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Willowdale Wizard
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posted 30 August 2004 04:19 PM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Trust
Wings of Desire
Pi
American Splendour
Last Tango In Paris
Ordinary People
The War Game
Rivers and Tides
Lawrence of Arabia
The Deer Hunter
Amores Perros
Raging Bull
Bladerunner
French Connection 2

guilty pleasures:

Highlander
Spaceballs
Monty Python And The Holy Grail


From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Screaming Lord Byron
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posted 30 August 2004 04:23 PM      Profile for Screaming Lord Byron     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Good to see some more love for Hal Hartley out there.
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Willowdale Wizard
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posted 30 August 2004 04:39 PM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
it's that final scene in "trust" when she's putting on her glasses and the framing of the traffic lights and the music.
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Sports Guy
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posted 30 August 2004 04:46 PM      Profile for Sports Guy     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Shane:

No Godfather? What's wrong with you?


I agree, however, Godfather III are you out of your mind. That, along with Rocky V are two movies that in my opinion never happened.


From: where the streets have no name | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
Shane
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posted 30 August 2004 05:13 PM      Profile for Shane     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Sports Guy:

I agree, however, Godfather III are you out of your mind. That, along with Rocky V are two movies that in my opinion never happened.


I really liked Godfather III, I'm not sure why some people have a problem with it really. I think it's on par with I and II so basically it's my favourite movie.


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Gentlebreeze
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posted 30 August 2004 05:17 PM      Profile for Gentlebreeze     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm still not sure how I felt about "Withnail and I"...while I laughed occasionally, I could help but wonder what was at all redeeming about the story or the characters. I just didn't care what happened to any of them, being so totally unsympathetic (IMO of course).

My favs recently:

-Rashomon
-The Hustler
-8 1/2
-Citizen Kane (deserves to be on every list it is)
-A Brief Encounter
-Das Boot
-Memento

*On a side note note, I saw "Hero" this weekend, which was my first theatre experience for months. While not a best film ever type, it was very enjoyable, and way more thought-provoking than I had expected. Quite compelling.

[ 31 August 2004: Message edited by: Gentlebreeze ]


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'lance
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posted 30 August 2004 05:38 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I'm still not sure how I felt about "Withnail and I"...while I laughed occasionally, I could help but wonder what was at all redeeming about the story or the characters. I just didn't care what happened to any of them, being so totally unsympathetic (IMO of course).

I agree, but I still like the movie for puncturing a lot of Sixties mythology. There was a dark side, and it's often overlooked.


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thwap
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posted 30 August 2004 06:51 PM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
People!! You're all supposed to chime in: "Yah! The Big Lebowski!! Fantastic movie!! Hilarious!!"

(this was all supposed to happen a long time ago,...)


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Screaming Lord Byron
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posted 30 August 2004 07:32 PM      Profile for Screaming Lord Byron     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Sorry, thwap. We're nihilists. We care for nothing.
From: Calgary | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
thwap
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posted 30 August 2004 07:37 PM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
My God. ..... Nihilists. .... I mean say what you want about National Socialism, but at least it's an ethos. ..... nihilists, ...


(i think i've got the sense of that line anyway.)
;0


From: Hamilton | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
Jesse Hoffman
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posted 30 August 2004 08:25 PM      Profile for Jesse Hoffman     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Alright, I didn't use to be able to do these things, but I'll give it a try. Here goes...

1/A Clockwork Orange: Stanley Kubrick's best movie is also my favourite film of all time. Malcolm McDowell performance is amazing.

2/The Godfather: Part 1: This is truly an American masterpiece. Exceptional acting, fantatic direction, and one of the best adapted screenplays of all time.

3/The Lord of the Rings Trilogy: Some will disagree with me here, but I've always been a huge LOTR fan and I think Peter Jackson did an amazing job of adapting the unadaptable. I've never seen a more techinally impressive film. Also, my favourite score of all time.

4/Pulp Fiction: From a huge Tarantino fan like myself, saying that this is his best film is quite an endorsement. I enjoy watching this movie so much, and the ensemble acting is great. Uma Thurman and Samuel L Jackson and excellent.

5/The 400 Blows: Wow, I saw this film from director François Truffaut just last night and was absolutely blown away. The most touching film I have ever seen, and a true masterpiece. If you haven't seen this film, see it!

6/Vertigo: In my opinion the best movie from the master himself, Alfred Hitchcock. I could watch this movie over and over again.

7/Dr Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb: Kubrick's black comedy masterpiece about the Cold War is easily my favourite comedy of all time. Peter Sellers has never been better than here, playing three roles and being excellent in each of them. George C Scott is very funny as well.

8/Taxi Driver: This fascinating film from Martin Scorsese is the director's best, and Robert Deniro gives the best performance of his amazing career. Love it.

9/Psycho: Not much needs to be said here. The quintessential thriller that, despite various rip offs and spoofs, has remained as good as when it first was released. Anthony Perkins is great in his career defining role, and the ending is one of my all time favourites.

10/Dogville: Does it get any more provocative and thought provoking than Dogville? I literally spent days thinking about the different aspects of the film and what the director was trying to say. Nicole Kidman is brilliant. Fascinating film.

[u]Runners Up:[/i]

Kill Bill - Uma Thurman gives such an impressive performance. One of the best times I've ever had at the movies.

Moulin Rouge! - Visually stunning, and always delightful. So much fun to watch.

Paths of Glory - In my opinion the best war movie ever made.

American Beauty - The screenplay is beautiful, and Kevin Spacey is exceptional. The movie is deserving of all of it's Oscars/

North By Northwest - Hitchcock's funnest film! I love it!

Ed Wood - One of my personal favourites. Martin Landau is simply brilliant as Bela Legosi. Sometimes hilarious, sometimes movie. See it.

8 1/2 - The best film ever made about film.

Casablance - So great. Not much needs to be said here.

Fargo - I enjoy few films as much as Fargo. Frances McDomand and William Macy are hilarious.

The Seven Samurai - Such an impressive film. Even with a running time of over 3 hours it never seems too long. Kurosawa's best.

There, done!

[ 30 August 2004: Message edited by: Jesse Hoffman ]


From: Peterborough, Ontario | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged
Cougyr
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posted 30 August 2004 08:29 PM      Profile for Cougyr     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by thwap:
People!! You're all supposed to chime in: "Yah! The Big Lebowski!! Fantastic movie!! Hilarious!!"

I can't agree. The language is so foul that we gave up after half an hour. If there is a story there, we never got to it.

Best movie? Marat/Sade.


From: over the mountain | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
thwap
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posted 30 August 2004 08:59 PM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
i do like "8-1/2." Say, I also like "The Bicycle Thief,"

and yes, Landau is brilliant in "Ed Wood." I think it is a very sweet, touching movie, (and funny and crazy).

Re: Cougyr, ... there was no story. But here's a scene for you,

Cowboy: 'i like yer style dude.'

Dude: 'well, i kinda like your style, ... that whole "cowboy" thing you've got going.'

Cowboy: 'i thank ye. but d'you have to use so many cuss words?'

Dude: 'What the fuck are you talking about?'

Cowboy: (sighs) 'have it yer way dude.'

More good 'uns:

The Magic Christian
The Fisher King
The Ladykillers (the original)
Return of the Killer Tomatoes (with George Clooney)


From: Hamilton | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
Jesse Hoffman
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posted 30 August 2004 09:02 PM      Profile for Jesse Hoffman     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yeah I found the Big Lebowski to be very funny.

I really want to see Dead Man...

[ 30 August 2004: Message edited by: Jesse Hoffman ]


From: Peterborough, Ontario | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged
sark
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posted 30 August 2004 09:44 PM      Profile for sark        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I had to go look up the director's name but I think Krzysztof Kieslowski's Three Colours Trilogy is wonderful. "Blue" is so sad, "White" is so funny and "Red" made me think for days.

Also, "The Scent of Green Papaya". Not a whole lot of action but the beautiful cinematography is exceptional.

And for something completely different, I think the first "Terminator" is a great movie. It set up the bleak sci-fi future of machines gone wild. And say what you like about Gov Arnie, "I'll be back" resonates even with people who didn't see the movie.

A movie I can never, ever watch: "Ole Yeller" which was on the at the drive-in theatre when I was four. Everyone else in the car was asleep, so no one prepared me for the last scene. I woke everybody up in the row of cars when I started screaming "They shot Ole Yeller!"


From: Ottawa | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
Timebandit
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posted 30 August 2004 10:55 PM      Profile for Timebandit     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
So many movies that I love...

I'll mention a few favourites, in no particular order:

Antonia's Line
Breakfast at Tiffany's
Ma Nuit Chez Maud
Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown
Thelma and Louise
Alien/Aliens (but the third one sucked bad)
Sabrina (the Audrey Hepburn one, not the remake)
The Vanished (the European one, not the American)
The Hours
Monty Python and the Holy Grail
Princess Mononoke
Spirited Away
Gabbeh
Edward Scissorhands

I could go on for hours. I might be back.

[ 30 August 2004: Message edited by: Zoot ]


From: Urban prairie. | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
Anchoress
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posted 30 August 2004 11:53 PM      Profile for Anchoress     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
That's a really tough one. I have a hard time separating my faves from movies I think are 'the best', but here's my feeble attempt (all lists in no particular order):

A) My personal favourites:

Star Wars
Heaven Can Wait (Beatty version)
Ship of Fools
Casino
The Sixth Sense
Sid and Nancy
Edward Scissorhands
Prince of Egypt
The Actuary
Highway 61


B) Movies I think are the greatest examples of the film genre - 'works of art' in their medium:

1. Casablanca
2. The Godfather Parts 1 and 2
3. Pulp Fiction
4. The Seven Samurai
5. American Beauty
6. The Sixth Sense


C) The WORST movie to ever change the world:

1. Star Wars

[ 30 August 2004: Message edited by: Anchoress ]


From: Vancouver babblers' meetup July 9 @ Cafe Deux Soleil! | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
August1991
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posted 31 August 2004 04:32 AM      Profile for August1991     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
How about choosing films made before you were born, and only three films. (Ten is too many.)

If you had to choose three books, would you choose books written recently? Film is a new medium. Let us see where it goes. In 2123, what films will people choose?

For now, I'll quickly choose these three films (made before my birth):

It Happened One Night
Ryan's Daughter
Chinatown


From: Montreal | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
Anchoress
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posted 31 August 2004 05:05 AM      Profile for Anchoress     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well, I consider there to be a difference between listing one's favourite films, and listing 'the greatest' films of all time...

The same holds true for books.

When I judge a movie's greatness, I am really judging the director - moviemaking is a medium where the primary creator (the director IMO) has to be outstanding as a storyteller, visual artist, coach, engineer and visionary.

But a movie doesn't have to meet all those criteria to be a 'fave' of mine - I choose favourites because they touch me in some way emotionally - something that is more likely to happen (for me) with a movie that was made to speak to my zeitgeist.

As far as movies from before I was born, my faves differ from those I deem to be 'the greatest'.

Faves: The African Queen, The Philadelphia Story, It's a Wonderful Life

Best IMO: Casablanca, Citizen Kane, 8.5

[ 31 August 2004: Message edited by: Anchoress ]


From: Vancouver babblers' meetup July 9 @ Cafe Deux Soleil! | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 31 August 2004 09:47 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Gentlebreeze's list is pretty close to mine. Right up there with Citizen Kane, though, I think, is The Third Man. I never tire of watching those shadows one more time -- it is so beautiful, and so wonderfully, quietly acted.

Da da da da da, da da, twang ...

And sark, Kieslowski is near the top of the list of films I want to see but haven't yet.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
thwap
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posted 31 August 2004 10:12 AM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Before I was born? That doesn't leave me with much. I can only think of:

1.The Great Train Robbery
2.A Trip to the Moon
3.Birth of a Nation

Actually, ... "It's a Wonderful Life" is a really nice film if you haven't seen it for a few years. I watched it on Elwy Yost's 'Magic Shadows' when I was a kid, and it was this big epic stretched over 5 days. I used to love 'Magic Shadows.'

And the 1950s British version of 'A Christmas Carol' with Alastair Sim. They really did a good job of it.

"The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari" and "Nosferatu" really are good old things.

There was a lot of randy stuff made in the 1920s, but i don't remember any names.

Back to up to now:

1."Trees Lounge" ... directed by and starring Steve Buscemi. Some parts are so funny, (like when he explains to the kid what happened to the old ice-cream man, 'Uncle Al.') And the opening torch song, and the sadness too.

2."Barfly" ... a nice waste of an hour or two.

3."Blue Velvet" ... not nice, but when you realize that the person you hate and despise is just a fictional creation, you know you've seen a strong work

4."Cradle Will Rock," ... Tim Robbins' film about the National Theatre Project (and more) in 1930s America. Bill Murray and his ventriloquist's dummy provide a stirring moment. Lots of good stuff.

5."12 Monkeys" ... (note, spoiler at the bottom of this post)*

6."My Left Foot" ... Daniel Day Lewis is great (and so is the child actor who plays the young Christy Brown). The mother and father roles are also well played. Very touching.

7."The Ice Storm" ... A really cool young lady said she hated it, but I thought it recreated the 1970s, and especially, the tawdriness of the 'key-swapping' thing, in horrifying intensity. These were such sad, sad, people.

"12 Monkeys" spoiler:

Not many movies can do the time travel thing well. As events move towards their inevitable conclusion, you get resigned to it, but you want to see how it happens, and every key just makes you sadder.
Also, watching it again, and watching Bruce Willis's character, his actions and responses take on new significance I honestly like Bruce Willis in many rolls, even though in life he's a moron Republican. In this one and "The 6th Sense" he conveys this sensitivity.
Finally, when Madeleine Stowe's character is watching Willis's character die, and then she sees the boy he used to be standing there watching everything and realizes who the boy is, she gives him this beautiful, sad smile, and you realize why the Willis character told her that he'd always loved her.

[ 31 August 2004: Message edited by: thwap ]


From: Hamilton | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
Jesse Hoffman
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posted 31 August 2004 10:33 AM      Profile for Jesse Hoffman     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'll just throw a couple of other films I really like out there, that haven't been mentioned.

- Cabaret
- City Lights
- Far From Heaven
- The Pianist
- Singin' In The Rain

I thought Peter Jackson's Heavenly Creatures was fantastic as well.


From: Peterborough, Ontario | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged
folker
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posted 31 August 2004 12:55 PM      Profile for folker     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm surprised no one's mentioned Gone with the Wind. Not that I think it's the greatest film ever, but it seems to be on everyone else's list.

Personally, I prefer GWTW to Casablanca. Maybe I have to watch the latter again, but it just didn't grab me.


From: Vancouver | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Anchoress
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posted 31 August 2004 01:01 PM      Profile for Anchoress     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I wouldn't put it on any of my lists because IMO it's a bit of a cheat - yeah it's a good movie, but the real work of art is the book. Would it have been as good a movie without that kick-butt source material?
From: Vancouver babblers' meetup July 9 @ Cafe Deux Soleil! | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
Screaming Lord Byron
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posted 31 August 2004 01:33 PM      Profile for Screaming Lord Byron     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Heavenly Creatures is a magnificent film. I'd add the bizarre and little seen antipodean fututrist prison movie 'Ghosts of the Civil Dead'.
Oh. And 'Bad Taste'.

From: Calgary | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
1st Person
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posted 31 August 2004 01:47 PM      Profile for 1st Person        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
-Apocalypse Now
-The Godfather I & II
-The Deer Hunter
-Taxi Driver
-A Clockwork Orange
-2001: A Space Oddysey
-Barry Lyndon
-Pink Floyd: The Wall
-Midnight Express

And last but not least: Enter the Dragon!


From: Kingston | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged
libertarian
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posted 31 August 2004 01:50 PM      Profile for libertarian        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Best CANADIAN film of all time:
Goin' Down the Road

From: Chicago | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
Jesse Hoffman
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posted 31 August 2004 07:05 PM      Profile for Jesse Hoffman     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I haven't seen that, but my favourite Canadian film is The Sweet Hereafter.
From: Peterborough, Ontario | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged
Lard Tunderin' Jeezus
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posted 31 August 2004 09:15 PM      Profile for Lard Tunderin' Jeezus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'd go with The Appenticeship of Duddy Kravitz, myself.
From: ... | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Stephen Gordon
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posted 31 August 2004 09:42 PM      Profile for Stephen Gordon        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Jésus de Montréal

When I was trying to advance my mastery of French from Ontario-High-School to Barely-Functional, I had the idea of trying to rent a video of a movie where the actors spoke Quebec French. The only one I could find at my local video store ( ) was Jésus de Montréal. Since it had subtitles, I could replay and replay bits until I could figure out what exactly they were saying.

I can't count how many times I saw it, but I never got tired of watching it.


From: . | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 31 August 2004 09:47 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
A few weeks ago I was flipping channels when I found one showing Jesus of Montreal (one of my favourites of all time too).

Even though I was seeing double from fatigue (insomnia), I quickly figured out something was terribly wrong.

It had been dubbed into English; and worse yet, an incredibly stilted English no-one ever spoke; and worse yet, so far as I could tell, they'd substituted English names for most or all of the French ones.

Now, it's part of the point of that movie that it takes place in Montreal, particularly; but you could have watched long stretches of this without realizing it was even set in Quebec, unless you know Montreal and recognized buildings or street scenes.

I thought of writing a shocked-and-appalled letter to the cable station; but of course, next morning I couldn't remember what it was. I have the vague idea it was ShowCase, though.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Stephen Gordon
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posted 31 August 2004 09:56 PM      Profile for Stephen Gordon        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I have a friend who did a PhD in church history at a Divinity school. She saw the movie with some of her classmates, and they never clued into the analogy! I mean, you can claim that Denys Arcand botched the job, but how could a div student so completely miss the point?
From: . | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 31 August 2004 10:05 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
At this point I guess one could take refuge in ancient gags about advanced students knowing more and more about less and less, until they reach the ultimate point of knowing absolutely everything about nothing at all...

But you're right, it is astounding. And it wasn't like Arcand was all that subtle. After his head injury, when he's wandering dazed in the subway, Lothaire Bluteau is quoting practically verbatim from the Gospels. Later when his organs are being harvested he's shown lying on his back in crucifiction position. And there's very much more in that vein, throughout the picture.

[ 31 August 2004: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Timebandit
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posted 31 August 2004 10:23 PM      Profile for Timebandit     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
7."The Ice Storm" ... A really cool young lady said she hated it, but I thought it recreated the 1970s, and especially, the tawdriness of the 'key-swapping' thing, in horrifying intensity. These were such sad, sad, people.

How could I have left Ang Lee out of my earlier list?!

"Eat Drink Man Woman" was brilliant. So was "The Wedding Banquet". And we quite loved "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon".

I also really liked "The Shipping News" -- no connection to Ang Lee, but Lasse Halstrom is also brilliant and for some reason I was thinking of the use of magic realism today.


From: Urban prairie. | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
Fidel
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posted 31 August 2004 10:24 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I thought Night Zoo was a strange kind of film that seemed to resonate in my memory for some reason.

But my all time favourite was a British movie spanning several episodes...The Singing Detective. There was music by some really old groups like the Ink Spots, Harmonicats etc. I'd never heard them before. Wonderful.

Has anyone seen the Danish comedy, "The Kingdom" which takes place in a hospital ?. It's a riot.

[ 31 August 2004: Message edited by: Fidel ]


From: Viva La Revolución | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
ice age coming
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posted 01 September 2004 08:20 PM      Profile for ice age coming     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I think, like most people here, I've seen a lot more recently made films than older ones. So I'll crack my list into two:

Pre 90s:

1. Vertigo
2. Touch of Evil
3. Citizen Kane
4. Bonnie and Clyde
5. The Killer
6. Blade Runner
7. Psycho
8. The Elephant Man
9. One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest
0. The Manchurian Candidate

Post 90s:

1. Pulp Fiction
2. Magnolia
3. In the Mood for Love
4. Requiem For a Dream
5. Princess and the Warrior
6. City of God
7. Croupier
8. Fallen Angels
9. Amores Perros
0. Traffic


From: Dubai, UAE | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
Timebandit
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posted 01 September 2004 11:55 PM      Profile for Timebandit     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"Maelstrom" -- a good Canadian film.
From: Urban prairie. | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 02 September 2004 12:24 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I have a friend who did a PhD in church history at a Divinity school. She saw the movie with some of her classmates, and they never clued into the analogy!

I don't believe it. Didn't the title give it away?

I saw it only once, in an artsy theatre, when it came out, and I remember catching on when Lothaire Bluteau chased the greedheads (moneylenders)out of the audition (temple).

Goin' down the Road and Highway 61 were purty good, but Jésus de Montréal was very good.

My favourites are:

The Godfather
The Good the Bad & the Ugly
Casablanca
Radio Days
Bonnie and Clyde
The Maltese Falcon
Chinatown
To Have and Have Not
The Big Sleep
Farewell, My Lovely (Mitchum's version)

When I was a kid we used to go to the cinema every Saturday afternoon. We saw a lot of killer tomato and gladiator movies in those days. I still like them, too.


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
bittersweet
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posted 02 September 2004 12:16 PM      Profile for bittersweet     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Anchoress wrote: moviemaking is a medium where the primary creator (the director IMO) has to be outstanding as a storyteller, visual artist, coach, engineer and visionary.

6 of your 10 personal favourite movies had writer/directors—no wonder you liked them so much: the primary creator was allowed on the set.

The director is vital, but the writer also writes visually, coaches, engineers, envisions...in order that the director may do the same. And the director does this so the editor can tell the story all over again, for the last time.

A brilliant director cannot make a brilliant movie out of a terrible script. A bad director can make a pretty good movie out of a brilliant script.

Separate Robert Riskin from Frank Capra. Separate Ben Hecht from Hitchcock, from screwball comedy, from just about anything.

The writer is God, the director is the General, the editor is the Magician (separate Walter Murch from Francis Coppola). Don’ let’s anyone get too big for his britches, hokay?


From: land of the midnight lotus | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Timebandit
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posted 02 September 2004 01:02 PM      Profile for Timebandit     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
The writer is God

Oh, come now, bittersweet, you mean "producer" there, don't you?


From: Urban prairie. | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
thwap
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posted 02 September 2004 01:13 PM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Ah yes, Mitchum's "Farewell My Lovely." A great portrayal.

Has anyone seen "Q&A" with Nick Nolte as an enormously scary rogue cop? A great look at racism and power.


From: Hamilton | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
bittersweet
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posted 02 September 2004 02:05 PM      Profile for bittersweet     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Zoot, I never resent the producer wearing the biggest britches, so long as the pockets are proportionally deep.
From: land of the midnight lotus | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
mai ouest
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posted 02 September 2004 02:29 PM      Profile for mai ouest   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Oliver Cromwell:

...trying to advance my mastery of French from Ontario-High-School to Barely-Functional...

Oliver, that's hilarious. Sadly, I am still in that situation, moniker notwithstanding. Will I redeem this thread drift at all if I say that I loved Jésus de Montréal?


From: the last green door | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
Sharon
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posted 02 September 2004 04:36 PM      Profile for Sharon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I have always loved the little movie "Come Back to the Five and Dime, Jimmy Dean Jimmy Dean." (A Robert Altman movie -- and I find I like most of his.)
From: Halifax, Nova Scotia | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
Baldfresh
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posted 02 September 2004 05:47 PM      Profile for Baldfresh   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I once ran a movie/convenience store (into the ground! HA! j/k) so a top ten isn't something I can come up with w/o some effort, and, well, I'm a bit lazy right now.

But has anyone mentioned 'Memento' yet? Or how about 'Spirited Away', fun for the whole family. And, hmm, lets see, 'Battle Royale'? Ohh, and 'Easy Rider'.

None of these would be in my top 10. Great films, though.


From: to here knows when | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
Fidel
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posted 02 September 2004 06:07 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'll admit that I do have a soft spot for Clint Eastwood movies. Bladerunner was an all time fave as well.

"We all got it comin', kid." - William Munny


From: Viva La Revolución | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
Fitz
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posted 03 September 2004 05:17 PM      Profile for Fitz     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Perfectly Normal

Blade Runner

More to come........(that isnt' a movie title, BTW)

[ 03 September 2004: Message edited by: Fitz ]


From: Toronto | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
thwap
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posted 03 September 2004 05:29 PM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Robert Altman's "Gosford Park"

is a remake of a french film, 'The Rules of the Game' which is quite good.

Bergman's "The Silence" is good too.


From: Hamilton | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
Baldfresh
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posted 03 September 2004 10:54 PM      Profile for Baldfresh   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by paxamillion:
1. Casablanca (1942).
2. Casablanca (1942).
3. Casablanca (1942).

Forgot about this after reading thru it all. I agree with Pax. Well, other films might occupy 2-3, but Bogey is #1.


From: to here knows when | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
folker
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posted 04 September 2004 12:21 AM      Profile for folker     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Some favourites:

1. Persona (Ingmar Bergman)--extraordinary
2. The Passion of Joan of Arc (Carl Theodor Dreyer)
3. First Name: Carmen (Jean-Luc Godard)
4. The Godfather Parts I and II (Francis Ford Coppola)
5. Ran (Akiri Kurosawa)
6. The Magnificent Ambersons (Orson Welles)
7. Blow-up (Michelangelo Antonioni)
8. Diary of a Country Priest (Robert Bresson)
9. Tokyo Story (Yasujiro Ozu)
10. Sunset Boulevard (Billy Wilder)

Honourable Mention: A Streetcar Named Desire (Elia Kazan)--featuring two of the greatest performances ever recorded on film: Vivien Leigh as Blanche and Marlon Brando as Stanley

Recent Favourites:
1. Lost in Translation (Sofia Coppola)
2. Chicago (Rob Marshall)

[ 04 September 2004: Message edited by: folker ]


From: Vancouver | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
August1991
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posted 04 September 2004 02:38 AM      Profile for August1991     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Books?

Les Miserables
Doctor Zhivago
Fifth Business


From: Montreal | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
beluga2
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posted 04 September 2004 04:00 AM      Profile for beluga2     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I can't even begin to try and pick my "favourite" movies; I'd go insane. But here's a few classics I've rented &/or borrowed from the library recently:

The Last Picture Show
Battleship Potemkin
Clockwork Orange
The Wild Bunch
Chinatown
The Battle of Algiers (very timely in light of Iraq)
Singin' in the Rain (I'm not much for musicals, but this one's great)


From: vancouvergrad, BCSSR | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
thwap
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posted 04 September 2004 08:50 AM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I really thought there'd be more to the gang going to see "the last picture show" in The Last Picture Show. I thought maybe while they were watching the movie, they'd have a big argument about what they were all doing.

They just watched it and then left. What did you think of Chloris (sp?) Leachman's character?


From: Hamilton | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
britchestoobig
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posted 04 September 2004 07:11 PM      Profile for britchestoobig     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I just can't rank by favorite movies...

But some fav's of mine:

hmm, I'll start hi-brow and degenerate from there:

Citizen Kane
Godfather Pt.1
Fight Club
Kill Bill
Akira (best senseless animation flick -ever-)
Starship Troopers (a big old 'snooze' button for the brain)

Ask me an hour from now and maybe all beneath CK will be different...


From: Ottawa ON | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
West Coast Lefty
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posted 06 September 2004 03:16 PM      Profile for West Coast Lefty     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The definitive list would take me hours to figure out, so at the risk of forgetting some stellar movies, here are a few of my favourites from different eras:

1940's:
His Girl Friday (1939)
Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939)
Rebecca
Notorious
It's A Wonderful Life

1950's:
Sunset Boulevard
Vertigo
Invasion of the Body Snatchers
Night of the Hunter
Some Like It Hot
The Apartment

1960's:

West Side Story
Psycho
The Birds
The Hustler
Hud
Repulsion
2001: A Space Odyssey
Planet of the Apes

1970's:
The Candidate
Last Picture Show
Duel
Mean Streets
Carrie
Halloween
Close Encounters of the 3rd Kind
Taxi Driver
Manhattan

1990's (I can't think of any great ones from the '80s offhand):
Do The Right Thing (1989)
Glengarry Glen Ross
Barton Fink
Trainspotting
Scream
Usual Suspects
Unforgiven
The Ice Storm
Election


From: Victoria, B.C. | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged

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