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Author Topic: films you've seen lately
rasmus
malcontent
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posted 09 May 2006 04:23 AM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I just saw the Tommy Lee Jones-directed Western, "The Three Funerals of Melquiades Estrada". It was actually quite good. Was it even released to regular theatres? I totally missed it, and it's scoring 83% at Rotten Tomatoes.
From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Stargazer
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posted 09 May 2006 07:46 AM      Profile for Stargazer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I saw Hostel last week. It was overly hyped and not very good, but not completely awful. More like filler. If you're a big fan of the horror/thriller genre, you may be disappointed.

Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants made me cry. It was a pretty good fell good movie.

Walk the Line with Reese Witherspoon was really, really good. Reese rules. If you love Johnny Cash or even if you're just curious, this is a great movie.


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Boom Boom
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posted 15 May 2006 12:51 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I watched Reese and Joaquin in the Johnny Cash movie on ppv recently - great stuff. The Penn & Teller short film "Bullsh*t" was on tonight so I watched it - about how the Boy Scouts of America now discriminate against gays and athiests (a lot of Mormon church influence). A lot of swearing, but otherwise okay.
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Boom Boom
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posted 15 May 2006 03:07 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Also the latest in the Harry Potter series ("goblet of Fire"). I don't remember much about it other than I thought it sucked, but the effects were incredible. Good effects does not a good movie make.
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voice of the damned
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posted 15 May 2006 02:07 PM      Profile for voice of the damned     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I watched Reese and Joaquin in the Johnny Cash movie on ppv recently - great stuff.

I saw Walk The Line two nights ago, and I agree it was pretty good. I liked how they didn't try either to downplay or exaggerate Cash's "hard-livin' outlaw" persona. He came accross as a pretty regular guy, with the same sort of problems that a lot of people in the entertainment business probably have.

A few weekends back I watched Lured, a 1940s noir set in the London nightclub scene, and starring Lucille Ball in a serious role and Boris Karloff is a comic role. Recommended more as a curiousity than anything else.

I was pleasantly surprised by The Exorcism Of Emily Rose, which I was expecting to be just another by-the-book religious horror film. It's partly that, but it's also a courtroom drama that examines the issue of religious belief vs. legal responsibility.


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notStraussian
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posted 15 May 2006 02:23 PM      Profile for notStraussian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I just saw 'Walk the Line' myself a few days ago and was pretty impressed. My only complaint about it was that they didn't really concentrate on Cash's 'rough years', which I think would 1000% more interesting than the love story between him and Roseanne.

I am a big fan of the whole self-destructive rock & roll lifestyle and like most people I like to rubberneck other people's misfortunes, particularly when it only takes about an hour or two - nice to see Cash was able to rise above it all and did not end up like Morrison, Joplin, Hendrix

It is a good movie though and both Joachim and Reese do great jobs in their respective roles


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LemonThriller
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posted 15 May 2006 04:13 PM      Profile for LemonThriller     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Anyone seen "Brick"? It's a high school gangster movie - pretty arty, funny and interesting.


Here's a link to it: http://brickmovie.net/


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Boom Boom
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posted 15 May 2006 04:21 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Saw "Stage Beauty" with Claire Danes on the weekend (almost all the movies I watch are on TMN on Expressvu). Quite good - about the first woman actress allowed to perform in English theatre.
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erroneousrebelrouser
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posted 15 May 2006 08:13 PM      Profile for erroneousrebelrouser   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Sweet little Reese won an OSCAR for her part in "Walk the Line"!! Go REESE! And her acceptance speech was so grateful. First time I had caught the Oscar's since 1997. I ALWAYS miss them.

A movie that I have just recently seen, and I had to watch it twice 'cause it blew my hair back so...was Constantine. Really great special effects; and Tilda Swinton plays the archangel Gabriel and with her androdginy is really convincing; at least until the very last scene...(And only because I had a problem with her costume.) Instead of the white fabric and lace up in the back tight trouser/body suit; I think to choose a more metallic or even body paint with the fabric that was needed to hold up her wings...IMO it could have been done better...Hey maybe I can send my resume to hollywood and they'll let me take over the next big blockbuster's costume design! Hmmmm... LOL


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Boom Boom
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posted 16 May 2006 12:13 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Just watched Distant Drumming... A North of 60(2005) movie. Quite good, but the acting is a bit forced, and it plods along in places. I'll watch almost anything that has Tina Keeper and Tom Jackson in it. The residential schools legacy was at the forefront in this movie. I thought the weakest character was that of TeeVee.

aside: I watched Tina Keeper MP raise a question in the House during QP a week or so ago, I thought she was sincere and effective.


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Boom Boom
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posted 22 May 2006 07:12 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Breakfast at Tiffany's. Haven't seen it in 30 years or so. I was rather disappointed, although I love watching Hepburn.
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Sharon
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posted 22 May 2006 07:24 PM      Profile for Sharon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I had some humdrum work to do around my kitchen on the weekend so I put Fiddler on the Roof on to the small TV and it was good company as I did my chores. I stopped what I was doing and gave my full attention to the most significant songs.

And Boom Boom, why were you disappointed with Breakfast at Tiffany's? I think from when it came out to the present, it's the movie I've seen more than any other -- except maybe Come Back to the Five and Dime, Jimmy Dean Jimmy Dean.

The two scenes near the end of Breakfast at Tiffany's involving the cat in the pouring rain are enough to bring me to tears just thinking about them, never mind seeing them.

I do think it's important to divorce the movie in your mind from the Truman Capote work that it's based on. There's not much resemblance.


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Boom Boom
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posted 22 May 2006 07:28 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh, Breakfast at Tiffany's has its moments, including the one you mentioned. But, overall, the movie seems forced and overacted. And making Mickey Rooney up as a faux-Japanese - that is truly unforgiveable. I think it's stuck in 1963. I'd love to see a remake, but not with Julia Roberts - please.
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Sharon
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posted 22 May 2006 07:59 PM      Profile for Sharon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yeah, you're absolutely right about Mickey Rooney. I'd kind of forgotten about him -- blocked him out, perhaps. But Martin Balsam and Patricia Neal remain clear in my mind. And Moon River, of course.
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skeptikool
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posted 22 May 2006 08:15 PM      Profile for skeptikool        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hopscotch with Walter Matthau and Glenda Jackson - for the umpteenth time.

It's my own original tape no amount of tracking adjustment could fix it. I'm having the same problem with other tapes - almost like they're timed to self-destruct. Anyone else experiencing this?

A great and fun movie for wine buffs - The Year of the Comet


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Roy_Whyte
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posted 05 June 2006 05:03 PM      Profile for Roy_Whyte   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Past few weeks I have watched and can recommend:

Jarhead - insightful, well acted and strangely funny
www.jarheadmovie.com

Why We Fight - excellent documentary around Eisenhower`s famous speech highlighting the dangers of the military industrial complex.
http://www.sonyclassics.com/whywefight/

And I just watched again - The Revolution Will Not Be Televised. An excellent first-hand account of the overthrow and subsequent rise of the Venezuelan people to restore Hugo Chavez. Stunning film, and stirs great emotions.
http://www.chavezthefilm.com/index_ex.htm


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arthur
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posted 13 June 2006 01:36 PM      Profile for arthur     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Last night I watched Confidence with Ed Burns and Dustin Hoffman. In my opinion Hoffman brings so much to this film. A very accurate glimpse of those who perform the Big-con. I've watched Frankenstein a whole bunch of times this past month. I've also been catching up with the Sopranos , and eating various dishes from the Soprano's cookbook.
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EmmaG
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posted 13 June 2006 02:04 PM      Profile for EmmaG        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
A few weeks ago I watched I]Everything is Illuminated[/I], which was quite moving. It is partially shot in English and partially in Ukrainian (I believe) with subtitles. The cinematography is excellent, and the plot is more nuanced and complex that what is found in most of the crap that appears at multiplexes these days.

Elijah Wood, and the other actors which I didn't recognize, were all quite good.

Another good subtitled movie, this time German, was Goodbye Lenin, which is a little more light-hearted. I believe this one is a few years old, and takes place in East Germany during the time that the wall came down. A young man's mother (who was quite involved with the Party) has a coma the day before the wall came down. Eight months later, she wakes up and the doctors warn that any distressing information could endanger her fragile health. So her son and his friends have to convince her that E. Germany has not changed.

(yes, I'm the geek at the subtitled section of the video store)


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erroneousrebelrouser
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posted 16 June 2006 12:17 AM      Profile for erroneousrebelrouser   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I recently watched two movies that I really liked and they're not new (I don't think, I'm pretty sure they're from about the mid nineties at least one) one was called "Below Utopia" - it's about a robbery gone terribly wrong and the other one was "City of Industry" with one of my favorite actors, Stephen Dorff. It also had in it Harvey Keitel, Timothy Hutton, Lucy Liu, among some other recognizable notables. It was a superbly casted and really intriguing movie; had me on the end of my seat. I'm a Stephen Dorff fan anyway. It's older, but I think a keeper. Harvey Keitel's most convincing role, as far as I'm concerned. He was genuineley scary; and definitley out to get his revenge -- at ANY cost.
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erroneousrebelrouser
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posted 19 June 2006 10:06 PM      Profile for erroneousrebelrouser   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
btw, Arthur; I've seen "Confidence" too and I really liked it as well. I found Dustin Hoffman's character almost unlike anything that he's ever played. Really creepy. And the best part of all was the name that Edward Burns referred himself as..."Jake Vig."

Hillarious. From the short hand to the long; this movie took the long hand to a happy ending.
(For a change!) Give me a good grifter movie anytime and that's sort of my cuppa tea. Also love horror movies; as long as they're not too cheesy. I watched "Dark Water" last night; and it was pretty scary. Jennifer Connally is one of my favorite actors as well.

Also; my kid just told me that "Constantine II" is coming out; or is already out. I didn't even know they were making a sequel. Can't wait. !

--Oops..just did a search to make sure that Andy was accurate with his information about the sequel; and it's a movie called "King Constantine II"..obviously having nothing to do with the former movie, "Constantine." My bad.

[ 19 June 2006: Message edited by: erroneousrebelrouser ]


From: home sweet home | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
malcontent
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posted 20 June 2006 10:59 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I saw Brick recently, and really enjoyed it. It's a neo-noir mystery set in a California high school.
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Papal Bull
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posted 22 June 2006 10:03 PM      Profile for Papal Bull   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I was dragged out by my friends to see Nacho Libre.

It was okay.


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erroneousrebelrouser
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posted 08 July 2006 03:34 PM      Profile for erroneousrebelrouser   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Has anyone seen "love me if you dare?" It's in french and the english translation at the bottom of the page; or else I wouldn't have understood it. I found it really good; but disturbing.
From: home sweet home | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged
Fidel
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posted 08 July 2006 09:15 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
What was disturbing about it in general, erroneousRebelRouser ?. (without giving too much away)

BTW, has anyone been to see Johnny Depp in Pirates of the Caribbean II ?. The nephews are waiting for me to take them to see it. Depp was absolutely real in Curse of the Black Pearl. A real kids movie for sure. The kiddies grew up in Ottawa and me in Northern Ontario. So they got a real kick out of us smuggling cheap pop and chips into the movie house to see Depp in the first pirate movie. Argh, no prey, no pay!!!


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Nanuq
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posted 08 July 2006 09:29 PM      Profile for Nanuq   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I just saw Superman Returns. It was all right, I guess. Everybody seemed a bit young for the role they played though (the actor who played Jimmy Olsen looked older than Lois Lane).
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erroneousrebelrouser
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posted 09 July 2006 09:10 PM      Profile for erroneousrebelrouser   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hi Fidel. Good question, and ironic as well. ! Disturbing; I loved the movie as it was a love story; and they didn't end up together; ended up marrying but I loved the idea of "gam"...how they started the "game" early as children and always kept it alive and how thrilling it was to see them try to get one on the other. This movie kept me on the edge of my seat.

The special effects; especially the part where it seems that he is dieing is one of the best I've ever seen -- 'wow' is the only way that I can explain it. Really good effects in cinematography/filmography...whatever you call it. And his explanations of what was happening to him as he would begin the "gam" was really great...whoever wrote it I give a thumbs up to.

And the ending was certainly unexpected. It kind of left me reeling, if you saw it you'll understand. I found it terribly romantic; terrifying; foolish; but they certanily managed to be together in eternity. (as far as we know...)


From: home sweet home | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged
Geneva
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posted 10 July 2006 03:18 AM      Profile for Geneva     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
some advice, please :
I live outside the country and try to keep up with Canadian film

saw plenty of great reviews for Quebec film C.R.A.Z.Y., and it is playing at a local theatre here in France, but do not know if it matches the hype


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Stargazer
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posted 10 July 2006 03:50 AM      Profile for Stargazer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
C.R.A.Z.Y is a great film. I loved it.

I recently watched The Exorcism of Emily Rose and that was the first movie to frighten me in awhile. Creepy, creepy, creepy.

Also watched The Hills Have Eyes. Not good.

High Tension - I felt sick through the whole movie, it is so tense. Alexandra Aja also collaborated with Wes Craven on Hills Have Eyes. Bad move.

Watched We All Fall Down - a movie about two friends who are heroin addicts, set in Vancouver. I liked the ending. Apparently based on a true story.

Watched Iraq - The unspoken Stories. Very good. Gets the blood boiling. Also watched Gaza Strip. My eyes are now opened.


From: Inside every cynical person, there is a disappointed idealist. | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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posted 10 July 2006 04:58 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh, I also watched the Exorcism of Emily Rose, with my father a couple of months ago or so. There was a part where the guy wakes up to find her twisted on the floor, staring at him with completely dilated pupils, catatonic. That freaked me out so badly that my father was chuckling for a good while over my reaction.
From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Stargazer
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posted 10 July 2006 06:01 AM      Profile for Stargazer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
That was the freakiest part. I have no idea how that guy could stick around after that nightmarish incident.

Why do they always speak Latin? I found that weird.


From: Inside every cynical person, there is a disappointed idealist. | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
oldgoat
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posted 10 July 2006 10:01 AM      Profile for oldgoat     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Speaking of films, I took the kids to their first drive-in. Hadn't been to one myself in alomost 30 years. Good God, what an awful experience. That has gotta be the stupidest way to see a movie. We let them have the front seats which meant Mrs. O. and I were in the back of a van and couldn't see anything. She slept, and I just ended up wandering around the place seeing what was on other screens.

Oh yeah, we saw Hedge, which was sort of cute if you like that sort of thing, and that new Jack Black movie, Nacho Libre. It had a surprising charm to it. Kinda weird really.


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moal
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posted 10 July 2006 12:49 PM      Profile for moal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Fidel, I saw Pirates of the Caribbean 2 and I thought it was pretty entertaining (and completely ridiculous- - in a good way) The beginning was a little slow, but the second half was great. If you liked the first one, you'll probably like the second.

Geneva, I also think that C.R.A.Z.Y. was a great movie. Highly recommend it.


From: flat places | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged
CMOT Dibbler
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posted 13 July 2006 03:09 PM      Profile for CMOT Dibbler     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Last Temptation of Christ: It's an important part of film history and the sound track rocks, but I must confess that I didn't really like the movie. The acting was for the most part was very stilted.

[ 13 July 2006: Message edited by: CMOT Dibbler ]


From: Just outside Fernie, British Columbia | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
N.Beltov
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posted 15 July 2006 07:55 AM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I saw North Country recently. It might be called a docu-drama or something like that; it deals with a landmark sexual harrassment class action suit down in a Minnesota mining work site. There were weak aspects to the film but I found it educational and interesting anyway.

quote:
A fictionalized account of the first major successful sexual harassment case in the United States -- Lois Jenson vs. Eveleth Mines, where a woman who endured a range of abuse while working as a miner filed and won the landmark 1984 lawsuit ...

Jenson v. Eveleth Taconite Co. (Wikipedia)

Here's more information at the Sexual Harassment Support Forum. It includes a .pdf file for download.

[ 15 July 2006: Message edited by: N.Beltov ]


From: Vancouver Island | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
Michael Nenonen
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posted 15 July 2006 06:56 PM      Profile for Michael Nenonen   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I watched Homecoming recently. While it's as subtle as a jackhammer and campier than Yellowstone, it's also blissfully cathartic. You can read about it here:

http://www.villagevoice.com/film/0548,lim,70455,20.html


From: Vancouver | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
Stargazer
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posted 16 July 2006 04:27 AM      Profile for Stargazer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
That looks really good. A horror movie that skewers Republicans? Can there be anything better for a lefty horror fan?

I watched Trans Generation last night. A mini series on 4 university kids who are going through gender transitions. It was really good.

IMDB

It gets an 8.4 out of 10 on IMDB.


From: Inside every cynical person, there is a disappointed idealist. | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
steffie
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posted 16 July 2006 07:14 AM      Profile for steffie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
N.B., I saw North Country too and cried. It hit me so hard, the situational stuff and the single mom stuff. *sniff*

But more recently than that, I watched Transamerica with Felicity Huffman. Great stuff! Hit me in a different way. The "behind the car" scene is so unbelievable I'd almost pay to see it again. I'd recommend this movie to anyone over the age of 16.


From: What are the roots that clutch, what branches grow / Out of this stony rubbish? | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
N.Beltov
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posted 16 July 2006 07:35 AM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The single mom in North Country who asserts herself in the face of attacks on her parental authority is the same character that eventually prevails against the sexual harassment of her co-workers and the mine management. The film provides a plausible source for her strength [her concern for her own kids] but is much less convincing in regard to the change of heart of many other characters. Hollywood isn't very good at depicting the development of solidarity, is it?
From: Vancouver Island | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
erroneousrebelrouser
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posted 16 July 2006 03:42 PM      Profile for erroneousrebelrouser   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
i love these recommendations especially the ones that stargazer and michelle were talking about --I love scary movies. my friend from toronto used to call me up at night and tell me what to watch since we both had on demand; he started with "saw" (bad move..hated it) creepy. then "grudge" -- i just didn't get it. but it was creepy. neither of them really scared me though.

I will be sorting through the recommendations that SG gave us because I love to be scared shitless.


From: home sweet home | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged
N.Beltov
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posted 16 July 2006 03:48 PM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
For Steffie and others who've seen North Country: I've put some more thought into the problem of depicting social solidarity in this film. The problem is that there's no real intention to depict an improvement in people's lives to be the result of collective action. Instead, a plucky (male) lawyer comes to the rescue of the (female) protagonist. But the presentation of the court case was clumsy and inverted in the film. Things were in the wrong order. And so on. There's a weakness there that mars the film.
From: Vancouver Island | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
erroneousrebelrouser
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posted 16 July 2006 05:10 PM      Profile for erroneousrebelrouser   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
As for movies like that; N. Beltov I thought that "A Civil Action" was excellent. And moving.

I'm going to try to find "North Country."

And I didn't know that there was a new Jack White movie out; I can't wait I am a big Jack White fan. (This is so funny a month after the fact, and I had edited the version quoting that I loved "Jack Black"...then realising that you were talking about a completely different person, I came back yet a third time just to point out how confusing these kinds of things can be! The obvious difference must have resulted in a few chuckles; I changed it thinking that I had made the mistake (I had) -- and still I have returned to admit the 'kind' of mistake I made; while reading another post; I ended up here again referencing some recommendations by other members. ! How funny. Anyway; still, with the notion that I was referring to Jack White (who married Meg White and taking her last name; changing his) Seems they will always be close, as she 'gave him away' when he got married. So much for traditions. I just find him fascinating. So..

That reminds me of "Coffee and Cigarettes" it a compliation of "vignettes" by Jim Jarmusch; and the opening is with Iggy Pop; standing in some old smoky bar (somewhere in California) by the juke box; stirring his coffee and smoking a cigarette; waiting for his friend to come in; who happens to be Tom Waits. It's really good. Kind of strange -- I'm a huge fan of them both; in another one Jack shows his Tesla Coil to Meg...Cate Blanchette does a twist of characters on "cousins" others appear like Steve Buscemi, Steve Coogan, The Wu Tang Clan, Bill Murray, and too many cameo appearances to mention. Really good. I can't decide which of the 'vignettes' that I liked the most; they're all good.

Jack Black, Jack White..hmmm. Lol. (embarrassing) Now I'm going to try to watch North Country, Nacho Libre, among others. Thanks for the recommendations.
(Apologies for my misinterpretations)

[ 03 August 2006: Message edited by: erroneousrebelrouser ]


From: home sweet home | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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Babbler # 560

posted 30 July 2006 01:11 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Papal Bull:
I was dragged out by my friends to see Nacho Libre.

It was okay.


That one doesn't look too bad. I keep seeing the trailers when I take my little one to kids' movies. Well, actually, I guess Superman isn't a kids' movie, but I saw it at another kids' movie I took him to as well, I think. I wasn't sure whether it was suitable for a seven year-old, but it looks like the kind of stupid-funny humour that would make me laugh for an hour and a half. I'm not sure I'd pay movie theatre admission for it, though.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
otter
rabble-rouser
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posted 30 July 2006 01:58 PM      Profile for otter        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I was fortunate enough to see Catch-22 the other day. A timeless movie that pointed out 'free trade trumps the supreme court of the land' some 40+ years ago.

The all time favourite musical of mine is Paint Your Wagon. Just imagine Lee Marvin and Clint Eastwood singing and dancing their way through a western. Of course i was born a wandering man myself so it has great resonance for me i guess.

But i confess, i have not been to a 'new' movie in over 4 years. Why bother when it will be on tv in 6 months anyways?


From: agent provocateur inc. | Registered: Feb 2006  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 30 July 2006 02:23 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm watching the Hitchcock fest on MPIX (on TMN) this weekend, but not all of it - 48 hours is too much. Torn Curtain is on - not nearly as bad as I had been led to believe.

[ 01 August 2006: Message edited by: Boom Boom ]


From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
otter
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Babbler # 12062

posted 01 August 2006 12:27 AM      Profile for otter        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
William H. Macey gives a stellar performance in Door-to-Door, the true life story of Bill Porter
quote:
a door-to-door salesman born with cerebral palsy whose determination and unwavering spirit made him a successful professional sales person for the Watkins Company for over forty years.

link

From: agent provocateur inc. | Registered: Feb 2006  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
rabble-rouser
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posted 01 August 2006 03:58 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I've seen Door-To-Door twice. Good film.
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
malcontent
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posted 01 August 2006 07:02 AM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I saw The Devil Wears Prada the other day. A fluffy but very enjoyable film.
From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
bigcitygal
Volunteer Moderator
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posted 01 August 2006 10:32 AM      Profile for bigcitygal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I saw "The Lakehouse" and loved it. But I'm a sap, and there's a groovy time-travel-shift-in-the-space-time-continuum kinda dealy going on throughout.

The good news is: Keanu exhibits three very distinct emotions during the film!

The bad news is: that's also the bad news.

Recommended for hopeless romantics only.


From: It's difficult to work in a group when you're omnipotent - Q | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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posted 01 August 2006 11:09 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I saw Wedding Crashers about a week and a half ago. It was totally stupid, utterly sexist, and I laughed most of the way through it. I felt guilty afterwards, though, so I'm hoping that's enough penance.
From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
greenie
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 11988

posted 01 August 2006 11:20 AM      Profile for greenie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by otter:
The all time favourite musical of mine is Paint Your Wagon. Just imagine Lee Marvin and Clint Eastwood singing and dancing their way through a western. Of course i was born a wandering man myself so it has great resonance for me i guess.

What? That's a real movie? I thought it was just a Simpsons joke. Wow.

Was it really about those two singing about painting a wagon?


From: GTA | Registered: Feb 2006  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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Babbler # 7791

posted 01 August 2006 08:11 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Just watched National Treasure (2004). Trinity Church, Wall Street, Broadway, Declaration of Independence, Masons, etc....

Far-fetched, but great fun.


From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
erroneousrebelrouser
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posted 09 August 2006 02:09 AM      Profile for erroneousrebelrouser   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Scariest movie I've ever seen, after thinking about it...was Twelve Monkeys.
From: home sweet home | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
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posted 09 August 2006 02:42 AM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I just rented "Salvatore Giuliano," by Francseco Rosi. Made in the early sisxties it is one of the first filma about the Sicilian mob. Very interesting, and comes across in the vein of "the Battle of Algiers." Similar feel and some of the same crew and wroters.

Very Interesting.


From: Out from under the bridge and out for a stroll | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Gentlebreeze
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posted 09 August 2006 05:45 AM      Profile for Gentlebreeze     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Last night the wife and I saw the first movie we have seen since the birth of our second daughter...Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest.

Ummm, not so good. Depp of course has his moments, as does Bill Nighy (Davie Jones). But the movie was all over the place and mostly unsatisfying. Too bad, the first was suprisingly entertaining.

Thanks for the night out grandma!


From: Thornhill | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged
Fidel
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5594

posted 09 August 2006 09:15 AM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I thought Dead Man's Chest was fantastical-magical. And my nephews loved it, too. The Flying Dutchman needs maintenance in the worst way, and The Cracken, a good flossing and mouthwash. And who would have guessed that Cap'n Barbossa would show up at the end ?. Bwbwbwbwbbwbw, scary! Can't wait to be press-ganged for the sequel. Haaaallo poppet.
From: Viva La Revolución | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7791

posted 12 August 2006 08:04 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Was listening to Lynyrd Skynyrd's GH earlier tonight (gawd, it's loud!!! ) so was ready when TMN put on "The Dukes of Hazzard" movie. Stupid as hell, but I guess it would be classified as 'entertainment' if you've finished a case of 2 - 4.
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
West Coast Lefty
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posted 12 August 2006 10:34 PM      Profile for West Coast Lefty     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"A Prairie Home Companion" - worth seeing even if you don't listen to the radio show (I don't), great cast, great music, and Meryl Streep can belt out those tunes much better than I expected. Lily Tomlin can't sing but she's a wonderful comic foil to Meryl in the film.

"An Inconvenient Truth" - take anybody you know who still doesn't believe human beings are causing climate change, or doesn't think global warming is a big deal, etc.

quote:
I saw Wedding Crashers about a week and a half ago. It was totally stupid, utterly sexist, and I laughed most of the way through it. I felt guilty afterwards, though, so I'm hoping that's enough penance.

Word, Michelle! It's not my type of movie normally, but I saw it last year and I busted my gut laughing. It's a good mindless summer movie, like the "Charlie's Angels" films from a few years back.

[ 12 August 2006: Message edited by: West Coast Lefty ]


From: Victoria, B.C. | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
N.Beltov
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posted 06 September 2006 09:35 AM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I rented Jacques Tati's Mon Oncle the other night and really enjoyed it again. I wish I could find a copy of Tati's Playtime as well for viewing.

Mon Oncle mocks modernity brilliantly. The DVD also included a short film from 1947, with Tati starring as a French postman. It was hilarious. One of the Monty Python group introduced Mon Oncle and drew attention to some of the small brilliancies in the film. Tati's films are like nibbling on cheesecake. You don't want it to end and it's a pleasure to prolong the experience. No one comes close to such films.

[ 06 September 2006: Message edited by: N.Beltov ]


From: Vancouver Island | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged

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