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Author Topic: Favourite Classical Piece
al-Qa'bong
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posted 03 March 2004 12:57 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I like Beethoven's Violin Concerto in D.

Henryk Szeryng and the Concertgebouw has been my favourite version, but I've been listening to Jascha Heifetz's 1940 recording with the NBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Arturo Toscanini this week - and I like it too.


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Wilf Day
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posted 03 March 2004 02:48 AM      Profile for Wilf Day     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well, that would be the most beautiful movement in the world: the slow fugue, the first movement of his 14th Quartet, the Quartet Beethoven himself considered his greatest. I'm listening to it as I type.
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Anchoress
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posted 03 March 2004 03:21 AM      Profile for Anchoress     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
O Ma Lyre Immortelle from Sappho by Gounod
Faure's Pavane
The presto movement from Beethoven's ninth

From: Vancouver babblers' meetup July 9 @ Cafe Deux Soleil! | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 03 March 2004 12:43 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Faure's Pavane

A Gilmour's Albums fan?


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Anchoress
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posted 03 March 2004 01:55 PM      Profile for Anchoress     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
What's that?
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al-Qa'bong
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posted 03 March 2004 01:59 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
A CBC Radio show. It used to air on Sunday afternoons. The Faure piece signed it off throughout the 1970s.
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Mycroft_
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posted 03 March 2004 02:05 PM      Profile for Mycroft_     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Another CBC Radio Two show uses that piece, another arrangement of it though, to sign off.
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Mycroft_
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posted 03 March 2004 02:06 PM      Profile for Mycroft_     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Anyone know the name of the piece "Sunday Morning" used to use (God I miss that show).
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Mandos
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posted 03 March 2004 02:17 PM      Profile for Mandos   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm a big fan of Rimsky-Korsakov's Scheherazade suite. I'm also a big opera fan, Verdi especially.
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al-Qa'bong
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posted 03 March 2004 02:37 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm not crazy about opera, but I like Carmen. I saw a performance last summer that featured Ottawa-based contralto Julie Nesrallah in the title role. She was incredible. Afterwards I listened to a Leontyne Price recording of the opera. Nesrallah was better.
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Mandos
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posted 03 March 2004 02:39 PM      Profile for Mandos   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Lately I have become a Philip Glass fan. for those who hate Glass.

I also have a thing for Holst's The Planets. And the finale to Shostakovich's 5th.

Yes, I have Romantic and 20th-century tastes.


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swirrlygrrl
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posted 03 March 2004 02:41 PM      Profile for swirrlygrrl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm all about the Vivaldi. In particular Winter, from "The Four Seasons," and a concerto for 2 violins and a string orchestra, whose number isn't coming to me right now. I just think strings are evocative.
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al-Qa'bong
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posted 03 March 2004 03:12 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hey Mandos; remind me never to invite you to a record hop.
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jeff house
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posted 03 March 2004 03:23 PM      Profile for jeff house     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
that would be the most beautiful movement in the world:

No, no, no.

The most beautiful music in the world is actually
"Au Fond du Temple Saint" from The Pearlfishers.

Also, Pachelbel's Canon has two movements which are superior to the one you refer to.


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Mandos
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posted 03 March 2004 03:23 PM      Profile for Mandos   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Cranks up the volume on Ravel's Bolero just for AlQ *evil smiley*
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Michelle
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posted 03 March 2004 03:28 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Rachmaninoff is beautiful too - you know that one that Eric Carmen destroyed? Yeah, well, the original Rachmaninoff concerto is spellbinding.

I don't know if I have favorite pieces when it comes to classical music. I have a favorite era - the Romantic era. I have lately been listening to a lot of Chopin piano pieces, which are always lovely.

I sang with a choir a couple of years back that performed a mass by Poulenc, which I then downloaded, and I listen to that regularly too.

Probably my least favorite era is Baroque - I find it too mechanical and methodical and rule-bound. I love the storminess of Romance era music.


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Mandos
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posted 03 March 2004 03:30 PM      Profile for Mandos   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
What I like about Baroque is the use of bassoons. For various reasons, I like anything involving bassoons.

Aside from that, if it ain't Baroque, don't fix it


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Willowdale Wizard
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posted 03 March 2004 03:46 PM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
beethoven's sonata no. 13, the piece in "32 short films about glenn gould" with the hamburg chambermaid
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Paladin
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posted 03 March 2004 04:25 PM      Profile for Paladin     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Mozart's Rondo alla turca and Pachelbel's canon.

BTW, anyone know the theme to the old British mini series "Game, Set and Match"? It was a haunting piece. I have no idea whether its contemporary or not.


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drgoodword
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posted 03 March 2004 04:43 PM      Profile for drgoodword   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Brandenburg Concertos by J. S. Bach. Musical perfection.

I also really like the soundtrack of Tous Les Matins Du Monde with pieces by Sainte Colombe and Marais.


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skdadl
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posted 03 March 2004 04:51 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
If I could figure out where I packed the LPs, I could tell you which of Vladimir Ashkenazy's performances of which of Mozart's piano concertos is my favourite. *frazzled*

I saw/heard Ashkenazy play at Massey Hall way back in the seventies -- simply electrifying. He obviously thought so too: as he walked off the stage, he turned to the orchestra, clasped his hands over his head, and gave them a Yay for us! sign.

Sadly, shortly afterwards Vladimir turned to playing and conducting Rachmaninoff. Simultaneously. Sorry, Vlad and Michelle, but that just did not work for me.

Can't find my requiems, either. I have a number of favourite requiems. Will return when I've rooted about.


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al-Qa'bong
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posted 03 March 2004 07:32 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Sadly, shortly afterwards Vladimir turned to playing and conducting Rachmaninoff.
I have one of his records - the 2nd Piano Concerto; the Eric Carmen one.

Hey, Mandos! Nice try! I have that record too, and Mussorgsky's "Pictures" on the flip side, so there!

Some 20th century stuff is listenable: Satie, Debussy and a little Prokofiev f'rinstance.


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Rufus Polson
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posted 03 March 2004 08:55 PM      Profile for Rufus Polson     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Everyone's so sophisticated.
Give me the glorious Ninth, Ode to Joy and all that.
Yeah, yeah, I know, so conventional.
But damn, when it gets going I just can't be unmoved--I find myself straightening up, feeling joyful, moving to the rhythm.

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Bacchus
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posted 03 March 2004 09:50 PM      Profile for Bacchus     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
hmm Four Seasons by Vivaldi, anything by Mozart or Rossini (which always makes me think of Bugs Bunny)
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Michelle
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posted 03 March 2004 10:07 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Rufus, I'm not too sophisticated to love the "cliche" classics. Mozart and Beethoven and Chopin were my first loves in the classics, and they continue to enchant me. I just kind of figured they went without saying.

I still love the overture to The Marriage of Figaro. Haven't heard it in ages though. Played it in high school.


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skdadl
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posted 10 March 2004 11:13 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Still haven't found the requiems, but CBC 2 just played my very favourite, which is Faure's -- I see there's another Faure fan above. The CBC was playing Dutoit conducting the Montreal Symphony, which was ok, but I have -- somewhere -- somebody else who makes the Dies Irae magnificently terrifying. The search continues.
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bittersweet
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posted 10 March 2004 12:50 PM      Profile for bittersweet     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Too bad I won't be around to hear Faure's Requiem at my funeral. The recording will be Barbara Hendricks, soprano, Josť van Dam, baritone. Orchestre du Capitole de Toulouse.

quote:
Hendricks: "I often say that you have to risk being yourself. Look at me: I sing music written by dead white men, and yet singing this music is what I'm made for -- I feel it, as though I had been born somewhere else!"
Since I will at least be a dead white man, if not a very good musician, Ms. Hendricks is obviously the right choice.

From: land of the midnight lotus | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged

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