babble home
rabble.ca - news for the rest of us
today's active topics


Post New Topic  Post A Reply
FAQ | Forum Home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» babble   » right brain babble   » culture   » Films you've seen recently

Email this thread to someone!    
Author Topic: Films you've seen recently
lagatta
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2534

posted 06 July 2003 09:51 AM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Since I'm (a bit too half-heartedly) studying German these days, I went to see the German film by Caroline Link, "Nowhere in Africa". A very conventional screenplay in many ways, but I enjoyed the lush musical setting. I was afraid it would be a bit colonialist and use the African people as an exotic background for the angst and material problems of German-Jewish professionals in exile from Nazism, but it avoided that pitfall by and large. I'd like to read Stephanie Zweig's autobiographical account "Nowhere in Africa", and then "Somewhere in Germany", when the family returns to their devastated and ethnically cleansed homeland to attempt to make a new life there.

This just for language learning: since there is a lot of narration and very clear, educated speech, it is very easy to understand.


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3674

posted 06 July 2003 01:11 PM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
last week, i saw "war and peace", a documentary on the indian nuclear bomb. it was being shown in NYC on the lower east side.

quote:
Filmed over three tumultuous years in India, Pakistan, Japan and the United States, after the 1998 nuclear tests on the Indian sub-continent, War and Peace is the most recent film by India's leading documentary filmmaker, Anand Patwardhan. It documents the current, epic journey of peace activism in the face of global militarism and war. Divided into six chapters, the film is framed by the murder of Mahatma Gandhi in 1948. This act of violence was so profound, its portent and poignancy remain undiminished 50 years later. As a child, Patwardhan was immersed in the non-violent Gandhian movement. Because of this, he regards India's trajectory towards naked militarism with sorrow; although along the way the film captures joyful stories of courage and resistance. WAR AND PEACE examines not merely the militarization of India, but analyzes the human cost that is extracted from its citizens in the name of 'National Security.' From the plight of residents living near the nuclear test site, and the horrendous effects of uranium mining on local indigenous populations, it becomes clear that, contrary to a myth first created in the U.S., there is no such thing as the "peaceful Atom."

Labour Left Briefing, July 1998

quote:
The left of centre Indian magazine Frontline has provided an important platform for the expression of anti-nuclear sentiment. In an article entitled 'The Hindutva weapon' the Marxist literary critic and cultural theorist, Aijaz Ahmed, questioned the anti-imperialist claims made by some apologists for the Hindu nationalist BJP government's nuclear sabre-rattling. He argues that weaponisation would serve US interests by ensuring that China is forced into an arms race with India.
Furthermore, as a result of the popularity for the BJP generated by the tests, he predicts that the government would be able to carry through massive liberalisation and privatisation of the economy Russian-style. Having provided his Hindu nationalist supporters with the nuclear bomb -- the ultimate lingam (phallic symbol) -- to worship, Prime Minister AB ("Atom Bomb") Vajpayee can now turn to give puja (offerings) at the altar of "market economics" without much interruption. That is, unless reds, greens and anti-communalists join together to break the jingoistic consensus of nuclear nationalism in India.

From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
swirrlygrrl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2170

posted 06 July 2003 09:25 PM      Profile for swirrlygrrl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I watched Godard's "Weekend" recently. I'm still puzzling.
From: the bushes outside your house | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
rob.leblanc
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2475

posted 07 July 2003 02:04 AM      Profile for rob.leblanc     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Just watched "My Left Foot" for the first time. Daniel-Day Lewis is brilliant in it.
From: Where am I? Where are YOU? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 214

posted 07 July 2003 08:37 AM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I rented "Gangs of New York" on the weekend. Nice film, if a bit slow moving in parts. I bet the book it's based on was really good. I might pick it up.

I'm not one for picking up "bloopers" but I did catch "Bill the Butcher's" glass eye move like a real eye in more than one scene.

And, I should have looked closer, but it seemed to me the hose coming from the "All Sorts" barrel in the bar looked like an aquarium hose. No plastics in 1860.

Other than that, I thought it well done, worth the rental price.

Not so "Unsaid" a Canadian production that tries to sell itself more as a thriller than the psycho-drama it turned out to be. Heavey going, this one, and if you're looking for fun, avoid it.

I watched "Dark Blue" last night. Good performances, but that doesn't exempt it from being just another cop flick. On the back, it boasts being on par with "L.A. Confidential" but that's going way too far.

It's more like a rip off of "Training Day."

No, I take that back, it is a rip off of "Training Day."


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
badlydrawngirl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4224

posted 07 July 2003 10:48 AM      Profile for badlydrawngirl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
'wonderland'. i'd heard a lot about it, but was pleasantly surprised at how good it was. the performances were really good and it showed london for what it was, just a busy place with lots of people living mundane real lives.
From: toronto | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
paxamillion
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2836

posted 07 July 2003 11:11 AM      Profile for paxamillion   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
We watched 'The Brave Little Toaster' this weekend. Hey, with a four-year-old around, such is life.
From: the process of recovery | Registered: Jul 2002  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3674

posted 07 July 2003 11:33 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
i liked "wonderland" too, especially that scene with the lovelorn waitress sister coming home on the upper level of the bus after her fling with the dating-ad-guy. you never see london night buses on film! the director, michael winterbottom, did a few things to make it look even more naturalistic.
From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
ronb
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2116

posted 07 July 2003 11:55 AM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Went to the re-opened Market Square cinemas - $5.50 matinees! - and saw the Hulk. Loved it, had a marvelous time. Nick Nolte's a hoot.
From: gone | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
mighty brutus
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3148

posted 07 July 2003 11:59 AM      Profile for mighty brutus     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Anybody seen the new Kiwi film "Whale Rider"?
I've read great things about it.

From: Beautiful Burnaby, British Columbia | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
xrcrguy
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1562

posted 08 July 2003 01:44 AM      Profile for xrcrguy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I recently saw The Book of Life.

Quite a delightful flick. It's a trippy, fun look at the apocalypse with a great sound track.


From: Believe in ideas, not ideology | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
badlydrawngirl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4224

posted 08 July 2003 11:13 AM      Profile for badlydrawngirl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
oooooh, that 'book of life' movie sounds good. been so long since i've seen anything that's piqued my interest! the director sounds interesting too.
From: toronto | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
Timebandit
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1448

posted 08 July 2003 07:38 PM      Profile for Timebandit     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Went to the re-opened Market Square cinemas - $5.50 matinees! - and saw the Hulk. Loved it, had a marvelous time. Nick Nolte's a hoot.

Wasn't he, though?

I also haven't seen Sam Elliot in anything in far too long a time.

Very enjoyable movie, even from the perspective of one who isn't much into the comic-book super-hero thing. Some very nifty cutting, really mimicked the flow of the eye when looking at a comic book. The CGI wasn't perfect, but I think Ang Lee really pulled it off well.


From: Urban prairie. | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 04 August 2003 11:19 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Mighty Brutus, I saw Whale Rider last week, and it was excellent. I think it would be a great movie for school-aged kids as well. The lead actor (I forget her name) was really, really good. The story was pretty neat. They blended the traditional and legendary with modern life really well in the film.

[ 04 August 2003: Message edited by: Michelle ]


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2534

posted 04 August 2003 11:58 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yes, I loved that film. The director presented her film at the opening of the First Peoples' Festival in Montreal this year. Nice to see such an intrepid young heroine.
From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
rob.leblanc
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2475

posted 05 August 2003 03:06 AM      Profile for rob.leblanc     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hmmm.....let's see.....I've seen so many...

Korosiya Ichi (Ichi the Killer) - Japanese flick based on the mega-violent comic. Like Battle Royale, not as gory as it sounds, and also goes deep in to emotion.

I finally rented The Pianist. Simply loved it. I still think Daniel-Day should have won, but it was a good film anyway.


From: Where am I? Where are YOU? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Dr. Mr. Ben
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3265

posted 05 August 2003 11:39 AM      Profile for Dr. Mr. Ben   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Saw "Russian Ark" recently. Nearly didn't because the Screening Room in Kingston was nearly full up when I got there -- I guess people appreciate tracking shots more than I thought. Anyhow, the film was beautiful, but somehow unfulfilling, as there was no story arc to speak of. Still, really neat to look at and technically very impressive.
From: Mechaslovakia | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3674

posted 05 August 2003 12:43 PM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
was that accidental ... story arc, russian ark? in 1998, i pleasantly discovered that you could gain free admission to the hermitage with your ISIC card. i saw the film at last year's london film festival, and it got a standing o. i thought the story arc was russian history leading up to the revolution?
From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
audra trower williams
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2

posted 05 August 2003 06:26 PM      Profile for audra trower williams   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I saw Tadpole. It seemed to all of a sudden be over.
From: And I'm a look you in the eye for every bar of the chorus | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
West Coast Lefty
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3697

posted 07 August 2003 02:01 AM      Profile for West Coast Lefty     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
We rented 2 classic films the other weekend: "Double Indemnity" and "Sweet Smell of Success." Both excellent, especially "Sweet Smell...", who knew Tony Curtis could be such a great actor? I love the dialogue in those '40s and '50s flicks:

From Double Indemnity:

Barbara Stanwyck: I wonder what you mean?
Fred MacMurray: I wonder if you wonder.

From Sweet Smell of Success:

Bert Lancaster: Sidney, you look happy. How can you be happy if I'm not?

Tony Curtis (separate scene): I must have left my sense of humour in my other suit.

Yep, they sure don't make 'em like that anymore...


From: Victoria, B.C. | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Sara Mayo
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3714

posted 07 August 2003 08:59 AM      Profile for Sara Mayo     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I saw Whale Rider a few weeks ago in Toronto. Excellent!

This week I saw La Grande séduction in Montreal. A film about a small Lower North-Shore village (near where Pierre Ducasse is from) living off social assistance that decides to lure a big-city doctor so that they can qualify for a factory in their town. It got rave reviews, and there were some very funny parts, but the story was a bit predictable. 3.5 stars (out of 5)


From: "Highways are monuments to inequality" - Enrique Penalosa | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Black Dog
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2776

posted 07 August 2003 02:02 PM      Profile for Black Dog   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Are we talking "films" or "movies"?

"Irreversable"- visually horrifying, shocking in content and actually kinda too long and shitty.

"Identity"- sucked, figured it out well in advance.

"28 Days Later"- big letdown. Not enough brain-eating.

"Pirates of the Carribean"- too goddamn long, though Johnny Depp is pretty awesome.


From: Vancouver | Registered: Jun 2002  |  IP: Logged
josh
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2938

posted 07 August 2003 02:26 PM      Profile for josh     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Rented Adaptation. Like the first two-thirds, thought it copped out towards the end.

Rented About Schmidt. Thought it was okay, but was expecting more.

Saw Seabiscuit. It was good, although a little long and a little schmaltzy.


From: the twilight zone between the U.S. and Canada | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
Albireo
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3052

posted 25 August 2003 01:48 AM      Profile for Albireo     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I have to agree with y'all about Whale Rider. I just saw it tonight. It is a truly wonderful film.

I took a chance and brought along my 7-year-old. It was unlike anything he'd ever seen, but he really liked it.


From: --> . <-- | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 25 August 2003 02:18 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I stumbled across Leni Riefenstahl's "Triumph of the Will" in the public library yesterday. I've wanted to see this film for years. I had been reading Kenneth Burke's essay, The Rhetoric of Hitler's Battle, earlier that day, so was doubly intrigued.

Since this is supposedly one of the greatest works of propaganda ever, I tried to discover what made it so effective on Germans in 1934. The initial scenes were so obvious that I'm surprised they could have been taken seriously. Hitler descended from the heavens in an aeroplane and then met the people. He had a glow about him. At one point it appeared that sunlight was emanating from his hand, and after he talked to a mother and her child in one scene, they were illuminated by sunlight which appeared to radiate from Hitler.

Much of the film was taken with scenes meant to reinforce the idea that all Germans belonged to a new collectivity, whose focus was the German State, the Nazi party and ultimately Hitler, who personified Germany. There was a scene featuring a rally of labourers, ranked like soldiers (every German is depicted as a soldier in the new struggle) at a parade. At one point the command, "Present shovels," was given, and the labourers executed this motion perfectly.

There was a long segment featuring parades, which I thought was tedious, but which likely reinforced the idea that Germans belonged to something powerful, growing, and on the move.

Overall, the film was very positive, stressing that Germany was growing and that it valued each individual German as a contributor to the collectivity. There were a lot of smiles, and much bathing, eating and singing. There was no mention of Jews or war, although in a sound-byte (their first use ever?), Julius Streicher said something to the effect that a nation that doesn't value its racial purity is doomed.


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Timebandit
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1448

posted 25 August 2003 04:09 PM      Profile for Timebandit     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Saw "Russian Ark" recently. Nearly didn't because the Screening Room in Kingston was nearly full up when I got there -- I guess people appreciate tracking shots more than I thought. Anyhow, the film was beautiful, but somehow unfulfilling, as there was no story arc to speak of. Still, really neat to look at and technically very impressive.

Oh, I disagree on the story arc. Atypical, but very much present. I quite liked it.

We have been on a Miyazaki kick, and have seen Princess Mononoke and Castle in the Sky in the last week. Started the first with the kids, but after discovering that it was quite violent in places, we turned it off and watched the rest after the wee grils had gone to bed. Amazing film.

Castle in the Sky was more suitable for kid viewing, and was also a terrific film. The animation, the story... Fantastic.


From: Urban prairie. | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
Lima Bean
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3000

posted 25 August 2003 04:41 PM      Profile for Lima Bean   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I saw Pirates of the Carribean and I loved it. Why's everybody gotta rag on it for being too long? I was sad when it was over and I had to go home!

Johnny Depp is just hilarious, and finally a role for Geoffrey Rush that I can just enjoy.

It's already ranked right up along with Willow and the Princess Bride on my list of favourite sick day movies. It's just so much fun!


From: s | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
spindoctor
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 958

posted 25 August 2003 05:07 PM      Profile for spindoctor   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I saw Quebec-Montreal recently....it was great!

Interesting characters that you could easily identify with...


From: Kingston, Jamaica.....oh alright....Kingston, Ontario | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
oldgoat
Moderator
Babbler # 1130

posted 25 August 2003 06:21 PM      Profile for oldgoat     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I don't know if it qualifies as a "film", but I saw that Rowan Atkinson movie "Johnny English yesterday with my son. What made it a real experience was that we were totally alone in the theater. Never had that happen before. I was down in front standing on a seat making animal silhouettes on the screen. We were both dancing in the open area at the front. We sat in opposite corners of the theater keeping up a loud and slightly tastless dialogue about the film.

Never had such fun at a movie. My boy said at the end we should tip the projectionist.


From: The 10th circle | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Sisyphus
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1425

posted 25 August 2003 06:26 PM      Profile for Sisyphus     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I thought Princess Monoke was... OK. I was a bit let down, actually, though the older boy liked it (it is a bit violent).

Spirited Away was jaw-dropping awesome!!! Wow!

I loved the POV shot at the beginning where we're looking through the car(moving) window between feet through the cellophane wrapper on the flowers. It set the tone for the sheer inventiveness of the film.

Gangs of New York: Never thought I would feel contemptuous of a Scorcese film. I turned it off at about the 2/3 point. It's a cheezy,derivative, by-the-numbers revenge flick with massive pretensions. Except for the sets and costumes, truly a waste of time.

Solaris I was boredboredboredbored.... lasted about 1 hour before returning it to the case. It wasn't bad, exactly. I just didn't care about the characters or the plot.

The Hours Made it to about the 1 hour point, too. Similar comments to Solaris except the characters in this one seemed so whiny and self-indulgent, I was not sorry to lay them to rest in the case. Made we want to avoid Virginia Woolf at all costs.

The Pianist So great on every level. Harrowing, moving, beautiful soundtrack.... I loved it!

Standing in the Shadow of Motown This is the best film I've seen all year and I'm not even a Motown fan!!! Great documentary, great soundtrack!!! I loved Bowling for Columbine, but I think STITSOM deserved the Best Documentary nod. Masterpiece.

Another Planet Low-budget, rough, but with moments of genius. The characters are very well-conceived. This story of a Toronto-born African-Canadian girl's first leg of a Katimavik-like program has an abrupt, unsatisfying ending . I would like to see more from writer-director-producer Christine Browne, as she becomes an experienced filmaker. All things considered, though, it was head and shoulders above Gangs of New York.

Agreed about Pirates of the Carribean. Great fun. Johnny Depp makes it.

[ 25 August 2003: Message edited by: Sisyphus ]


From: Never Never Land | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
josh
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2938

posted 25 August 2003 07:36 PM      Profile for josh     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I enjoyed Pirates of the Caribbean as well.
From: the twilight zone between the U.S. and Canada | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
Timebandit
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1448

posted 25 August 2003 07:44 PM      Profile for Timebandit     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Solaris I was boredboredboredbored.... lasted about 1 hour before returning it to the case. It wasn't bad, exactly. I just didn't care about the characters or the plot.

Two words: Flat and slow.

I'll add a third, on second thought: Yawn.


From: Urban prairie. | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
midge
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3542

posted 25 August 2003 07:58 PM      Profile for midge     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I just saw Kids. It's horrible - harsh, disturbing, disgusting.

I also saw Frida - that woman fascinates me.

And I saw The Life of David Gale - the plot is brilliant.


From: home of medicare | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 214

posted 25 August 2003 10:36 PM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Unfortunately, I guessed the ending to "The Life of David Gale" in the first five or ten minutes of the movie.

I find American movies quite often very broadly telegraph their endings, but in this particular case I'm not sure how else it could have been done. I didn't see anything too heavy handed going on, (like in other movies, when there's a five second close up on the gun over the mantle. Gotta figure it plays an important part in the end of the movie)

I thought it well written, and acted and worth the watch all the same. Nice recovery for Spacey after "Kapax".

Can't do a proper review of "House of a Thousand corpses". Watched much of it on fast forward.

I've said it a hundredty billion times. You can't have horror without characters you care about being in mortal danger.

If you have one dimensional icons being imperilled, what you have is something else. Particularly if it's the cheerleader icon.

Movie made me shudder for all the wrong reasons. It's a horror movie made by a fan of horror movies who understands the style of horror, but not the vital essence.

Saw "Bowling for Columbine" finally.

Genius, what else can you say?


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3674

posted 09 September 2003 11:25 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
"28 Days Later" - Not enough brain-eating

you can say this about many current films: seabiscuit, solaris, russian ark ... the list goes on and on.


From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Skye
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4225

posted 09 September 2003 11:48 AM      Profile for Skye     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I saw American Splendor. It started off a little slow, so I thought I might not enjoy it. But it was actually a really cute, funny movie.

I also rented a Mike Leigh movie; All or Nothing. It was about the working poor in South London. Very dismal and depressing. Nevertheless, I thought it was pretty good.


From: where "labor omnia vincit" is the state motto | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
Lima Bean
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3000

posted 09 September 2003 12:05 PM      Profile for Lima Bean   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I saw School of Rock, starring Jack Black and directed by Richard Linklater (Waking Life, Dazed and Confused). It ROCKED!! It's totally hilarious and genuine and rockin.

apple quicktime trailer

Yeehaw! Stick it to da man!!


From: s | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
Timebandit
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1448

posted 09 September 2003 12:34 PM      Profile for Timebandit     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I saw Whale Rider on the weekend. Gorgeous, powerful. Gave me hope that there is room for good stories out there. I may buy the DVD.

[ 09 September 2003: Message edited by: Zoot Capri ]


From: Urban prairie. | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
Mandos
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 888

posted 09 September 2003 12:38 PM      Profile for Mandos   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I find the DVD setup to be rather evil.
From: There, there. | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 09 September 2003 12:48 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"West Beirut" by Ziad Doueiri. Stewart Copeland, formerly of the Police, did the music.

Here's a Review

I think the film is worth watching, if only because it undermines many stereotypes people the West believe about life and politics in the Middle East.

Here's another Review


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Sisyphus
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1425

posted 09 September 2003 12:57 PM      Profile for Sisyphus     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I recently rented The Believer, a controversial film about a star Yeshiva student who becomes an antisemitic white supremacist. Wow! It knocked my socks off, though I would never want to see it again.
Apparently and understandably it was very controversial because it portrayed the protagonist as a very intelligent and articulate young man whose "insider" antisemitism is presented cogently and without rebuttal.

It was a fascinating character study and the lead actor does an incredible job, IMO, in portraying the love-hate relationship his character has with his Jewish faith and the way his psychopathic violence is seen to arise from his desire not to appear "weak".

It's strong stuff, but provoked me as few films have recently.

Unfortunately, most of the supporting characters are poorly written and particulalry the protagonist's girlfriend requires a heroic suspension of disbelief to be seen as credible. The fascist inner circle looks more like a book club in its portrayal and Billy Zane's character is particularly unconvincing.


From: Never Never Land | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged

All times are Pacific Time  

Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic    Move Topic    Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
Hop To:

Contact Us | rabble.ca | Policy Statement

Copyright 2001-2008 rabble.ca