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Author Topic: How Many More Times?
Tommy_Paine
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posted 11 December 2007 04:20 PM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Will Led Zeppelin play?

Last night's concert seems to be getting rave reviews: A sample of different reviews from the Star

I think the lure of money-- and the advent of viagra-- might encourage a new Led Zeppelin tour, and new legends involving groupies.


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Sven
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posted 11 December 2007 04:39 PM      Profile for Sven     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Tommy_Paine:
Will Led Zeppelin play?

Last night's concert seems to be getting rave reviews: A sample of different reviews from the Star

I think the lure of money-- and the advent of viagra-- might encourage a new Led Zeppelin tour, and new legends involving groupies.


I'd like to see them play.

Actually, I'd even like to see a Robert Plant/Alison Krauss concert (which is, at first blush, an odd pairing--but their duet album, "Rising Sand" was excellent).


From: Eleutherophobics of the World...Unite!!!!! | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Sven
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posted 11 December 2007 04:40 PM      Profile for Sven     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Has anyone listened to Zep's recent digitally remastered albums?
From: Eleutherophobics of the World...Unite!!!!! | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
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posted 11 December 2007 04:50 PM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'd be more interested in a collection of the music that, um, inspired Page. I've heard some on the Randy Bachman show on CBC radio. Some old recording of a guy on his Louisiana porch with a steel guitar.

Sent shivers down my spine.

I wouldn't put Page in this category, but I always remember the famous B.B. King quote from years ago: "All them white boys want to play the blues so bad, and most of them do."

[ 11 December 2007: Message edited by: Tommy_Paine ]


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Boarsbreath
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posted 19 December 2007 07:32 PM      Profile for Boarsbreath   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I don't think BB King had Page in mind there; BB's a musician, and music ain't got skin.

Thing about reforming for a tour is, as the New Yorker guy put it, Led Zep is now a cover band -- covering themselves. And Plant has fresh music happening...


From: South Seas, ex Montreal | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
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posted 20 December 2007 06:20 AM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Page alluded to some new stuff he's been working on, and seemed to be not against putting it out as new "Led Zeppelin" stuff if the band reforms.

While I've always liked "Led Zeppelin", I was never a big fan of Robert Plant, either in the band or out. I tend to think there were times when his vocal antics nearly ruined some songs.

But then, each band member was allowed to self indulge from time to time, but the only one, in my ear, who could really pull it off was Page.

Before the concert, I was curious as to how Bonham was going to play. Would he just be letter perfect to his dad's stuff? Or would he inject himself, his own interpretations into the music? I as glad to read that it was the latter.

I've a few recordings of Rod Stewart singing with Jeff Beck. I often wonder if "Led Zeppelin" might have been even better with Rod Stewart instead of Plant. I expect to be a cult of one on that-- Stewart currently being identified more with the old crooners circuit where "depends" are thrown on stage instead of panties, but listening to Stewart sing with someone like Jeff Beck is a different thing altogether.


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Boarsbreath
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posted 20 December 2007 04:45 PM      Profile for Boarsbreath   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hey. When the instrumental going gets crunchy, as in Dazed & Confused or the epynomynous How Many More Times or really, most of the hard Led Zep, it's the highish tenors that get going vocally. You gotta get above the strings to be heard: that's what Plant taught metal.

Besides, Rod S can't (couldn't) wail...!


From: South Seas, ex Montreal | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
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posted 20 December 2007 05:37 PM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
That thought occurred to me. Where Plant's higher range carries, Stewarts gets whisky. And in the early going, back in the late sixties, I don't think the technology could have compensated. So, I don't think you are entirely wrong, or much wrong for that matter.

I think back in the sixties, everyone was trying to play catch up with the amplified guitar. Hence the pounding of John Bonham-- drums weren't miced in the early going. Upright bass was eclipsed by the electric bass. In recordings by Buddy Holly, or Jerry Lee Lewis, it suffers from the lack of electric bass. Compare Del Shannon's original recording of "Runnaway" with the punched up version used for the series "Crime Story" back in the...early 90's? Wow, what a difference.

Just thinking about it, as a non musician, and after a few Pan Galactic Gargle Blasters under my belt, rock or pop music underwent a more rapid evolution from the late 50's to the early 70's, and the music today's younguns listen too seems to be stagnant.

Some people point to the artists or the industry, but I think it has more to do with technology.


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Boarsbreath
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posted 21 December 2007 02:14 PM      Profile for Boarsbreath   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Les Paul: the real "Rock God".

And one of 'em had a Les Paul...


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Tommy_Paine
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posted 22 December 2007 06:03 AM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I remember an interview on "Daily Planet" with Jeff Martin from "The Tea Party". He was showing his rather large collection of guitars he uses, and displayed an acoustic guitar made out of steel. He said it was an attempt to gain volume before the advent of the electric guitar.

It had a real cool sound.


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DonnyBGood
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posted 22 December 2007 06:15 PM      Profile for DonnyBGood     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Robert Plant's last solo effort was enjoyable as rock art music and it had some nice autobiographical and lyrical anti-war licks.

Jimmy Page has faithfully reworked the sound on the Led Zep catalog so that it resonates and sounds better. The concert I'm told had wonderful sound. Plant simply cannot sustain the big notes but still attacks the phrasing with much of his original finesse. This limitation has the effect of making the music palatable aurally.

The question for music like this is does it have currency in the present music scene or is it a nostalgia act? Sinatra went on for decades with limited vocal capacity and wondrous technique and musical support.

The Cult is probably the closest successor to the Led Zep sound.

Much of Led Zeps accoustic stuff and lighter rythmic exercises like Battle of Evermore, Dancing Days is interesting. I haven't listened to In Through the Outdoor from the late 70's in years. But this was a difficult album because Plant's voice was ruined by then from all the screaming and he was trying to salvage it as an unusual vocal instrument.

To compare listen to last year's who album - a somewhat dreadful affair - but Roger Daltry's voice does not seem to have suffered greatly from his belting out tunes.

The only advantage to Led Zep is that they are not manufactured by ad agencies. They are the original item. Sure they "borrowed" extensively but so did Verdi, Puccini, Bach and many other classical musicians.

There is a great Youtube video of the young Jimmy Page playing skiffle.

I am a Led Zep fan.


From: Toronto | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
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posted 23 December 2007 05:57 AM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
The question for music like this is does it have currency in the present music scene or is it a nostalgia act?

I tend to think that every musical sub genre has a limited shelf life of creativity and originality, and once that has been achieved, it either exists as nostalgia or unintended satire.


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jrootham
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posted 23 December 2007 03:12 PM      Profile for jrootham     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Tommy_Paine:
I remember an interview on "Daily Planet" with Jeff Martin from "The Tea Party". He was showing his rather large collection of guitars he uses, and displayed an acoustic guitar made out of steel. He said it was an attempt to gain volume before the advent of the electric guitar.

It had a real cool sound.


They are
National Steel guitars. They are loud, pretty, and heavy.

Paul Simon's lyric "The Mississippi Delta was shining like a National guitar" refers to this instrument.


From: Toronto | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged

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