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Author Topic: Oryx and Crake
Tommy_Paine
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Babbler # 214

posted 09 January 2004 04:14 AM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yes.

I put the trauma of "The Stone Angle" behind me, and have, after an absence of some twenty five years, re-entered the realm of Can Lit.

I enjoyed Atwood's "Oryx and Crake." This pre and post appocalyptic science fiction story reminds me somewhat of Ursula K. Leguin in style, but more strongly in the science fiction philosophy of taking a current trend and idea and extrapolating it into future.

The trend/idea here is corporate control of gentic engineering. In this extrapolation, there are no checks on genetic engineering. Corporate scientists live and work in cloistered, protected environments, away from prying eyes and under the scrutiny of those demanding profit. Here lots of wierd animals are made, lots of handy materials sythesized, and, of course, new and improved humans.

All this, and the end of the world to boot.

Atwood, like upteen gazzillion writters before her, decides to weave an Hamlet anology into the story. Crake. Father killed by guy who marries his mother. And of course, Crake has a few things to say about the nature of reality.

I rather liked the way Atwood wove the events of the book in a non-linear way. Bits of events here, hints there. It all comes together quite nicely thouth. In less skilled fingers, the story might have seemed typed out of sync.


For the luddites amoung us, this book will be received as a tale of why we must stop genetic engineering. The science devotees might use it as a cautionary tale, warning that we must have public participation regarding how this new technology is to be utilized.

I fear the ship has sailed on both groups, and Atwood's vision may not be so far removed from where we'll be in fifty or sixty years.

I spotted one blooper in the book. A reference to Crake taking off to the Bahamas. Surely, in the pre-apocalyptic globaly warmed world where Harvard has been flooded out of existance, the Bahamas wouldn't exist. Above sea level.

On the whole a quick and pleasant read.

[ 09 January 2004: Message edited by: Tommy_Paine ]


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
jrootham
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Babbler # 838

posted 09 January 2004 05:43 PM      Profile for jrootham     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
[Major Pendantic Fit]

There is at least one Bahamian island which is higher than Harvard (which isn't very high at all)

(According to my recollections of both places, as opposed to examining altitude data)
[/MPF]


From: Toronto | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 214

posted 12 January 2004 03:15 AM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Mount Alvernia, on Cat Island, is 63 m above sea level.

Be that as it may, the Bahamas as such wouldn't be there.


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged

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