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Author Topic: Kruschev
clockwork
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 690

posted 26 March 2003 04:08 AM      Profile for clockwork     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
The critical questions concerning this man who succeeded Stalin are how he came to reach the pinnacle of the Soviet hierarchy and why he, a product of the Stalinist system and an accomplice in Stalin's terror, turned against his mentor. He was not only barely educated "he had problems with spelling" but also, in the words of the Russian sculptor Ernst Neizvestny, with whom he engaged in a public debate on aesthetics, "the most uncultured man" he had ever met.

Man of Opposites, a Force for Good and Evil

I bristle about people equating spelling with intelligence. I cont spl either. I won't say Kruschev is someone I look up to, but even bad spellers can witness things and disagree.


From: Pokaroo! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Adam Smith
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posted 26 March 2003 04:15 AM      Profile for Adam Smith     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Actually I've heard that bad spelling sometimes indicates intelligence because it is often caused by a haste to get ideas out.
From: Manitoba | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
DrConway
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Babbler # 490

posted 26 March 2003 04:21 AM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Keep your pants on. He often loved to play up his peasant origins when he was talking with foreign dignitaries. A quote, possibly apocryphal, runs something like this: "Gentlemen, you have been to Harvard, the Sorbonne, Eton, all these fancy universities, yet I, a muzhik from the Donets Basin, have run rings around you. Why is that?"

Incidentally, Khruschev's education was a bit more than rudimentary, since he was able to get a technical education after the Revolution and he got a job as a pipefitter. It is true, however, that his plans to go on for further training were disrupted as his Soviet political career began, and by the time World War 2 came along he was a member of the Politburo, and one of the only ones, as I recall, who was sent to the front lines in the Ukraine in order to coordinate the Soviet defense (and later, offense) from an up close and personal perspective.

I have often thought that these years in battle were what decisively turned him against Stalin, although he didn't hate Stalin yet. That wasn't for some years, when he began to resent bitterly the way Stalin would make fun of his Ukrainian background and make him dance the gopak.

None of Khrushchev's compatriots on the Politburo ever saw up close the dangers of war and the consequences of Stalin's micromanaging interference in the war. But so many times Khrushchev saw how a countermanding order from Stalin nearly cost his battle unit's chances for survival.

Khrushchev was a remarkable person in so many ways. A man who had never travelled outside the USSR's borders before becoming Premier of the Soviet Union (and later, General Secretary) nevertheless saw that a different way was needed - a way not based on unrelenting terror and fear - to govern the Soviet Union and that there might be a possible path to peace between the US and the USSR. Most of all, he gathered the courage to be the first person to expose Stalin's crimes, although by today's standards his exposure was incomplete and insufficient. This was the lasting legacy of the Twentieth Communist Party Congress: it seeded the next generation of Soviet leaders who would one day see their chance to try and make things right under Gorbachev.


From: You shall not side with the great against the powerless. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
clockwork
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Babbler # 690

posted 26 March 2003 04:21 AM      Profile for clockwork     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'd automatically respond that what you heard was pop psychology. I have no proof of this, but I'd theorize that smart people can be bad spellers just as dumb ones can too.

You only need to work with a bunch of factory workers and to know a few professors to understand that.

edited: my post is to Adam Smiths

[ 26 March 2003: Message edited by: clockwork ]


From: Pokaroo! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
clockwork
rabble-rouser
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posted 26 March 2003 04:29 AM      Profile for clockwork     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I think the link highlights his time in the Ukraine during the war. But as the guy that hit his shoe on the table at the UN, I can understand why some might consider him uncultured. But, again, he made the that speech.
While I won't say I'm a fan, I gotta give the guy some respect:

quote:
The greatest achievement of Khrushchev's 10-year rule was to dispel the paralyzing fear that had gripped the country under Stalin. As I can testify from personal experience, by the early 1960's a certain degree of normalcy had returned to the Soviet Union, although those who had lived through the Great Terror of 1937-38 never quite rid themselves of fright. Khrushchev also closed most of the concentration camps and posthumously rehabilitated some 20 million of the terror's victims, which, even if it came too late to benefit them, helped their families. He relaxed censorship and reopened Russia's contacts with the non-Communist world. All this was to the good.

From: Pokaroo! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
DrConway
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posted 26 March 2003 04:33 AM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The link doesn't really go into details on the Ukraine bit, IIRC.

And yes, he was a man quick to express his emotions, regardless of what they were. I don't know of any other leader who has ever expressed his fury by actually taking off his shoe and whacking a podium.

A unique person, he was.


From: You shall not side with the great against the powerless. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
clockwork
rabble-rouser
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posted 26 March 2003 04:42 AM      Profile for clockwork     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
A unique person, I definitely agree.

Just to note, I find it odd how the most Stalinist regimes ever (my god, Stalinism takes it's name from the USSR) can spawn people critical to an icon, and even disintigrate.

Yes, it's a long multi-generational process and even now their are people in Russia that look up to Stalin, but...


From: Pokaroo! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Adam Smith
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posted 27 March 2003 09:47 PM      Profile for Adam Smith     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I said sometimes here people.
From: Manitoba | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
clockwork
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 690

posted 27 March 2003 09:55 PM      Profile for clockwork     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Is that the word of the day?


Ah blah wee ohh!


[teehee.. sorry....)


From: Pokaroo! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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Babbler # 1064

posted 27 March 2003 10:34 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Chou En-Lai, who was of bourgeois background, is supposed to have said to Kruschev, "Comrade Secretary, you and I have a lot in common."

"How so?" Kruschev asked.

"Why, we're both traitors to our class," replie Chou, urbanely.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged

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