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Author Topic: Amir Peretz elected Labor Party leader
josh
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posted 10 November 2005 12:54 PM      Profile for josh     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:

Soon after the official results were announced, the new Labor chief quickly reiterated his intention of pulling the party out of Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's government, propelling the country into political disarray and advancing the likelihood of early general elections.

"We will notify the prime minister that we want to leave. We want to leave... certainly out of a desire to turn the Labor Party into an alternative that intends to take power in the next elections," he said.

"Amir will discuss with the prime minister an agreed date for an election," said Yuli Tamir, a Labor legislator and Peretz supporter.


The voting result, which came at dawn, followed a tightly-run race between the two opponents, which initially showed a slight lead for Peres.

Peretz, a fiery union leader, wants to steer the party back to its socialist roots, pull out of the coalition and force early elections. His message has resonated with Israelis disenfranchised by government cuts in social spending and the country's growing gap between rich and poor.

Shortly after 6 A.M., amid cheering from Peretz's supporters, Labor Secretary-General Eitan Cabel announced that Peretz had won with 42.35 percent of the votes, while Peres was backed by 39.96 percent of voters. In third place was Benjamin Ben Eliezer, with 16.82 percent of the vote.


http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/643724.html

quote:

The election of Amir Peretz has shaken the political system and may mark the beginning of a new era in Israeli politics. The big winner is the Labor Party, if only because Peretz has the ability to attract sectors that have been inaccessible to Labor for many years.

Peretz's personal profile is almost identical to that of millions of Israelis who immigrated to Israel or were born here after its establishment. A son of Moroccan immigrants, who was raised in a southern development town and reached his position with great toil, and made his way to the top. It is ironic that it was the new immigrants of the 1950s and 1960s who voted for Labor and made it stronger against the right, led at the time by Menachem Begin. The Likud's rise to power in 1977 drew the low-income sectors away from the Labor Party, and it has been ambling behind Likud ever since.

Peretz may symbolize for the populations at the fringe of society, that Labor may become their political home in the sense that if he made it from the bottom to the top, so can they. The fact that he climbed the political ladder to head the Labor Party, traditionally considered as an Ashkenazy-conservative stronghold, is good news for the party among those living on the fringe of society. It is possible that many of them will abandon Likud and Shas and join Peretz.


http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/644045.html


From: the twilight zone between the U.S. and Canada | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
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posted 10 November 2005 01:42 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Some people are positive about this development. It is the end of Perez, and the old labour party, but is it a new begining, or just the end.
From: Out from under the bridge and out for a stroll | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
robbie_dee
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posted 10 November 2005 01:43 PM      Profile for robbie_dee     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Jo-Ann Mort:

quote:
Last night, there was a cliff-hanger vote in Israel's Labor Party for Party Chairman, the result of which will force a seachange in Israeli politics. Amir Peretz, the head of Israel's Histadrut trade union federation, spent his life in Israeli politics with a populist vision fueled by social justice. As Mayor of the development town of Sderot in Israel's southern periphery--the town that has been bombarded by qassam rockets for months and months--and later as head of the Histadrut, and a Knesset member, Peretz has been the lone Israeli political figure to forcefully lash out at the social and economic inequalities in Israeli society. Now that he has brought the Labor Party back from the dead, observers worldwide will see a different face of Israel. He will show what a modern style of class politics is about--how a vision of social and economic justice can inspire and unite people, not divide them. I have known Amir Peretz for years. He is an inspired and shrewd leader who can change the face of Israeli politics, and show a way forward for working people and for the liberal-left in general.

House of Labor blog

For background, also see this earlier rabble thread: Leftist union leader contends for Israeli Labor Party leadership


From: Iron City | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
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posted 11 November 2005 04:18 AM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Certainly an interesting development. Also, I believe, the first Labour head of Sephardic background.
From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
B.L. Zeebub LLD
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posted 11 November 2005 07:02 AM      Profile for B.L. Zeebub LLD     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I'll be interested to see how Labor's platform vis a vis Palestinians turns out. On the one hand, many of the working class types Peretz hopes to lure from Likud and Shas have been strong backers of Sharon's "get tough" strategy. Xenophobia and so-called "no-nonsense" militarism are often an easy sell amongst blue collar types as leftists everywhere have found out for decades. On the other, it doesn't take a genius to see that the genesis of many of the economic crises facing Israel can be found in the over-proportionate role of the military and security providers in the economy. Occupations are really expensive, both economically and socially, and people at the bottom are starting to feel it.

Will Labor be able to extend the logic of economic and political emancipation of working and lower class peoples across ethnic lines to include Palestinians, and hasten toward a just settlement that considers something other than Israel's expansion and "security". Will they even try?

I wonder if the need to lure traditionally right-wing voters will actually temper Peretz' "socialism" and we'll end up with a party that might win the election, but will in many ways have taken on traditional Likudite platforms - much like the lap-dog routine they've enjoyed under Perez?

[ 11 November 2005: Message edited by: B.L. Zeebub LLD ]


From: A Devil of an Advocate | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
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posted 11 November 2005 07:08 AM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
You shine with optimism.
From: Out from under the bridge and out for a stroll | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
ohara
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posted 11 November 2005 07:41 AM      Profile for ohara        Edit/Delete Post
Nothing wrong with optimism.
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Cueball
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posted 11 November 2005 07:44 AM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Nor sarcasm, except when missed. I hardly think B.L. Zeebub LLD post could be deemed "Tony Robins" positive.
From: Out from under the bridge and out for a stroll | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
B.L. Zeebub LLD
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posted 11 November 2005 09:37 AM      Profile for B.L. Zeebub LLD     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Cueball:
You shine with optimism.

I just figure that if he were that much of a threat to the status-quo, he probably wouldn't have made it this far. I hope to be pleasantly suprised. Unless he intends on a complete house-cleaning of the old guard than he is stuck with the same folks who have tacitly nodded their approval at the occupation, at the construction of the wall, and at much of Sharon's hardline approach, though they do wring their hands a little more.


From: A Devil of an Advocate | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged
josh
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posted 11 November 2005 10:14 AM      Profile for josh     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Yossi Beilin, head of Meretz-Yahad, on Peretz's election"
quote:

There will not be a merger like that before the elections, but thoughts of an alignment after the elections are something we will have to discuss. Labor has not become a different party under Peretz. This is a party that is blinded by the lust for power, a party that has lent a hand to an economic policy that has widened terrible gaps and to a security policy that has led us to the darkest hours."

. . . .

"I think it will be very difficult for Peretz to change the Labor Party


http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/644347.html


From: the twilight zone between the U.S. and Canada | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
DrConway
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posted 11 November 2005 02:56 PM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I would say I am cautiously optimistic. Certainly Peretz can do much to inspire more confidence, if he states unequivocally that all the privatizations that have occurred under Netanyahu and Sharon will be reversed, and that the social safety net will be strengthened.
From: You shall not side with the great against the powerless. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Ken Burch
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posted 11 November 2005 06:33 PM      Profile for Ken Burch     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
It would be the best sign if Peretz could arrange either a merger of Labor or Yachad or(if various egos prevent this)at least got the two groupings to stand as a coalition.

Shimon Peres made a valiant effort to create a Israeli/Palestinian peace settlement, but he went too far in diluting the socialist/social democratic aspect of Labor's policies. For an "old Labor" man, he was far too "New Labour" in the British sense.


From: A seedy truckstop on the Information Superhighway | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
The Danite
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posted 14 November 2005 12:59 AM      Profile for The Danite        Edit/Delete Post
The election of Peretz is excellent news indeed.He will be the most effective opponent of the LIkud for years.He can hit them right in the strong holds.He will make the direct connections betwen the costs of continuing the war with the Palestinians and burdens being born by average Israels which are enormous.Also encouraging is his desire to get to final status negotiations and free Israel from this ball and chain.Although he might not win the election it seems that he will improve Labors power, and can act as a viable alternative even if Sharon has a few more years to meke he full extent of the bankruptcy of his ideas clear to all.The election od Peretz probably saved the Labor from oblivion, Peretz is a tough fighter and he will make headway I am sure. Yashir Koach to Peretz.
From: Quebec | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged
robbie_dee
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posted 17 November 2005 12:14 PM      Profile for robbie_dee     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Sharon agrees to early elections

quote:
JERUSALEM - Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon agreed Thursday to hold early elections, possibly as soon as February, kicking off a political campaign certain to freeze all moves to restart Mideast peace talks.

After meeting Sharon Thursday morning, newly elected Labor Party leader Amir Peretz said they had discussed holding the ballot between late February and the end of March, instead of next November as scheduled. Sharon's government is in danger of collapsing because Peretz wants to pull Labor out of the ruling coalition.

Yosef Lapid, head of the opposition Shinui Party, said he and Sharon agreed on a March ballot.

"On the one hand, we want to shorten the process, but on the other, we have to give time to prepare for elections, and so we agreed they would be in March," Lapid told The Associated Press.

Sharon told the Yediot Ahronot newspaper that he had reached the conclusion that it was best to have elections "as quickly as possible."

Israel's parliament is scheduled to hold a preliminary vote Monday on whether to dissolve the government, Sharon's spokesman Asaf Shariv said.



From: Iron City | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged

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