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Author Topic: 2008 Oscars
Michelle
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posted 24 February 2008 02:20 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Anyone into it? I'm not overly, but since I've got nothing better tonight I might watch.
From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
1234567
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posted 24 February 2008 02:40 PM      Profile for 1234567     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm watching the red carpet to see George Clooney and Viggo Morten...(you know who I mean)
From: speak up, even if your voice shakes | Registered: Aug 2007  |  IP: Logged
Ken Burch
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posted 24 February 2008 04:15 PM      Profile for Ken Burch     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
You mean Aragorn The Perpetually Stubbled, right?

[ 24 February 2008: Message edited by: Ken Burch ]


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1234567
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posted 24 February 2008 05:26 PM      Profile for 1234567     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh yes!
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Stephen Gordon
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posted 24 February 2008 05:31 PM      Profile for Stephen Gordon        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Probably as good a time as any to link to this...
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Mercy
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posted 24 February 2008 08:00 PM      Profile for Mercy     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I wanted Juno to win.

But it didn't except Diablo Cody who was very cool.

I think the writer's strike made the whole thing much better.

ie. shorter.


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Boom Boom
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posted 24 February 2008 08:14 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Someone gave a passionate speech against Guantanamo, rendition, and the need to bring America back from darkness to light. Also, I think near the beginning of the evening someone said something about the need to bring the Democrats back. I was hoping to see Michael Moore on stage again, but no, although "Sicko" was one of the nominees.
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jrose
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posted 25 February 2008 05:37 AM      Profile for jrose     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I’m a religious Oscar watcher. I think it almost borders on an obsession. And I’m usually one of the few who watch it from the red carpet, right to the bitter (or bittersweet) end. And I’m usually one of the few who aren’t bored for a second of it (even the historic montages!) I think the highlight for me was the folks from Once winning for best song. It's a great film and it's even more of a success story when you hear that it was filmed over three weeks for $100,000. Not bad for the age of blockbusters.
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oldgoat
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posted 25 February 2008 05:44 AM      Profile for oldgoat     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Bourne movie got it for editing, which will probably piss people off as editing was not really one of the film's strengths.
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Boom Boom
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posted 25 February 2008 06:17 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Heather Hiscox and Jelena Adzic on Newsworld this morning called theis year's Oscars 'the year of the foreigners' although Canada was shut out.

And, someone said during that same clip that, wrt Oscar fashion, Nicole Kidman wore enough bling (1002 carats) to make up for the lack of it elsewhere.


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oldgoat
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posted 25 February 2008 06:18 AM      Profile for oldgoat     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I think they've stopped seeing us as foreigners.
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Boom Boom
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posted 25 February 2008 06:20 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yeah, thanks to NAFTA and deep integration. WRT the US, I always want to be a foreigner.
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1234567
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posted 25 February 2008 08:19 AM      Profile for 1234567     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I liked that 98 year old guy who did set design. He was on the ball. Cripes, imagine what he's seen in the business after being in it for 70 years.
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Michelle
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posted 25 February 2008 08:20 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I ended up watching a Law and Order marathon instead.
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CMOT Dibbler
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posted 25 February 2008 08:27 AM      Profile for CMOT Dibbler     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
That's just great, anincredibly bloody action movie wins out over two movies which humanize mental illness and teen pregnancy.

The Academy wouldn't know quality if it bit them in their
collective ass!


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martin dufresne
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posted 25 February 2008 08:37 AM      Profile for martin dufresne   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Quality has nothing to do with it, my dear... I see the U.S. and most of the anglo-saxon word as heading toward total war in a mounting wave of cynicism and violence as power as identity. The culture has to feed this hubris - How else could our countries kill for oil without guilt? A good recent Quebec film lampoons this artistic cesspool with it very title: "Continental - Un film sans fusils" (a film without guns).
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Michelle
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posted 25 February 2008 08:39 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hmm. I really loved No Country For Old Men and was glad to see it got best picture, but I can see why people would feel that a couple of other choices would have been better politically.

However...it's not like No Country was just some shoot-em-up gorefest. It made a statement too, about the futility of drug wars. And there is something to be said for the incredible cinematography - I mean, if you saw it in the theatre, you felt like you were THERE in those desert scenes. It was incredible.


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martin dufresne
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posted 25 February 2008 09:21 AM      Profile for martin dufresne   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Futile but exciting - don't underestimate the thrill factor. As for the film's morality, it seems to me that violence and morality have always gone together like horse and carriage in the dominant U.S. culture.
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1234567
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posted 25 February 2008 11:08 AM      Profile for 1234567     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
(start rant)
I go to the movies to escape and be entertained so my reasons for liking a movie are completely different than most people here. I don't expect to learn anything, or take on a new cause. I WANT TO ESCAPE just for maybe two hours. That, to me, is what Hollywood and the movies are all about. Quite frankly I get sick to death of Michael Moore etc....and all their do-gooder stuff and people who get up on the podium and make some political statement etc. SHUT UP, I want to be entertained,. Try living my life for a while, I don't need no reminding about how it is....I WANT TO ESCAPE reality.

(end of rant)


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Michelle
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posted 25 February 2008 11:10 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Heh. I'm right there with you, 1234567.

(Although I guess it's luck on my part that Law and Order and No Country are pretty far gone from anything I've experienced in my life, so it's escapist to me!)


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CMOT Dibbler
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posted 25 February 2008 11:16 AM      Profile for CMOT Dibbler     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by martin dufresne:
Futile but exciting - don't underestimate the thrill factor. As for the film's morality, it seems to me that violence and morality have always gone together like horse and carriage in the dominant U.S. culture.

To a certain extent that happens here too. Regardless of how much we mock the USians, we do share many cultural traits in common.


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martin dufresne
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posted 25 February 2008 11:41 AM      Profile for martin dufresne   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I have nothing against escapism - but couldn't the don't-give me grief argument be extended to TV, books, newspapers...?
The original issue was how come a hyper-violent film gets chosen, validated, acclaimed over humanist films. Can it be coincidence that this happens in an imperialist country that is literally destroying the world?
I am not speaking for women, but, as a man, I am concerned that what most men "read" are crime novels - with violence against women very much featured as centrepiece - and pornography. Could it be that they are escaping too, but to a world that influences yours?

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Coyote
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posted 25 February 2008 11:49 AM      Profile for Coyote   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I think you've really missed the point of No Country, Martin and CMOT. I would argue that it is an intensely humanist film, in fact a critical film. The semiotic underpinnings of the film are directly connected to the violence of USian politics: the power struggles, the decisions made in far-away offices which mean life or death for innocent victims, the absolute lack of remorse (even self-justification; the main "villain" makes two people choose their fate, in effect) from those who perpetuate violence, the difficulty of those who try simply to live decent lives in the face of all-consuming anger and rage.

I do not think that it is an accident that this movie is set in 1980, in rural America. This is the start of the Reagan revolution and the incredible sentimentality that continues to gloss over the very real violence in USian culture.

It is a critical movie. A thoughtful movie. In my view, a deeply humanist movie, with a lot to say. I'm glad it won.


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Catchfire
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posted 25 February 2008 11:52 AM      Profile for Catchfire   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
What's a "humanist" film? Wuthering Heights?

No Country for Old Men was the best movie I've seen in years. Not only was it cinematically smart (as only the Cohen brothers could be--mired in the heritage of film noir and Westerns) and, as Michelle points out, visually gorgeous, it was the best adaptation of a novel I've ever seen, loyal to every fatalistic and minimalist impulse of the original text.

No, it's not just a dick flick. More than anything, it's about failure. The failure of nostalgia and conservatism to save us. The realization that not only have we let society out of our hands, but whatever we were holding out for, whatever image of America we now realize is slipping away, was only an illusion to begin with. The West is based on a ghost--not on honesty (like Llewelyn's wife), or good ol' boys (like Tommy Lee Jones)--but on a ghost. And that ghost is nothing but blood, murder and violence.

And now, we, the old men of America, of the West in general, are starting to figure that out. But not only is it not our country any more, it never was.

ETA: cross-posted with Coyote, whom I clearly agree with.

[ 25 February 2008: Message edited by: Catchfire ]


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Michelle
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posted 25 February 2008 11:52 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Just to challenge you a bit on this, martin...most women I know love crime dramas and crime novels. Which is probably why there's such a surge of female writers of pulp fiction crime novels.

So I'm not so sure that it's necessarily a gender thing when it comes to violence in film or books. Porn is probably different, I'm sure probably more men consume porn than women, but perhaps because it's more socially acceptable for them to do so and because most of it is made for them as the audience (although lots of women enjoy mainstream porn too).


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CMOT Dibbler
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posted 25 February 2008 12:07 PM      Profile for CMOT Dibbler     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I haven't seen No Country for Old Men.

I just thought that Juno was a good movie and it should have won more awards. Diablo Cody got an Oscar for best screenplay though, which she deserved.


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martin dufresne
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posted 25 February 2008 12:08 PM      Profile for martin dufresne   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yes, I agree that many women love crime novels - and I'd really like to see some research on if and how they relate to them differently than do men, whom they identify with, etc.
But does this mean that the pattern isn't gendered? Aren't both women and men brought to buy into the Western gender system where violence or at least "power over" are paramount? Indeed, it seems to me that gender is play-acted to the hilt in almost all crime & porn scenes; and when genders are reversed - with a strong female power figure or a male victimized by a woman, for example - that reversal is central to the narrative, not a coincidence.

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Catchfire
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posted 25 February 2008 01:44 PM      Profile for Catchfire   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
All texts are gendered. The best hardboiled novels reaffirm masculine fantasies (homophobia, misogyny, eroticizing the feminine) while simultaneously calling the boundaries that shore up these identities into question. Since the Cohen brothers are massive Dashiell Hammett fans (Blood Simple takes its title from Hammett's Red Harvest (1929)) they are well aware of this fact. Is masculinity such an oasis for Tommy Lee to take comfort in?
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martin dufresne
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posted 25 February 2008 01:58 PM      Profile for martin dufresne   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oases are for wusses - he wouldn't want one. My concern is the moral solipsist stance that viewers see reiterated in Tommy Lee and similar heroes or antiheroes, their perfectly-honed pain making their supernatural stature even more seductive.
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Boom Boom
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posted 25 February 2008 02:32 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by 1234567:
(start rant)
I go to the movies to escape and be entertained so my reasons for liking a movie are completely different than most people here.

To each their own. I love the Michael Moore docs, and I've seen the Al Gore flick many times, never get tired of it. On the other hand, any film showing Mel Gibson makes me wanna puke.


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Coyote
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posted 25 February 2008 02:35 PM      Profile for Coyote   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by martin dufresne:
Oases are for wusses - he wouldn't want one. My concern is the moral solipsist stance that viewers see reiterated in Tommy Lee and similar heroes or antiheroes, their perfectly-honed pain making their supernatural stature even more seductive.
Have you seen the movie? This is a complete misreading of his character, how he is portrayed, and what happens to him. It attempts, anyways (art is art, and tastes vary) to subvert those tropes.

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1234567
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posted 25 February 2008 02:39 PM      Profile for 1234567     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
On the other hand, any film showing Mel Gibson makes me wanna puke.


"sigh" I know. I once had a thing for Mel and then he disappointed me. "sigh"


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Coyote
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posted 25 February 2008 02:40 PM      Profile for Coyote   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I like a mix. I'm going to watch There Will be Blood this week. That'll be No Country, Fight Club, and TWBB in the space of a week. Next film I rent: Spice Girls.


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Boom Boom
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posted 25 February 2008 05:00 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Coyote:
Next film I rent: Spice Girls.

Good heavens! Why would you do such a thing?


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laine lowe
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posted 25 February 2008 05:31 PM      Profile for laine lowe     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I thought There Will Be Blood was a brilliant film, a tour de force as they like to say. I watched No Country for Old Men on the same day and it paled in comparison.

Both had similar landscapes but the cinematography of There Will Be Blood was absolutely breath taking as was the set and sound design. Every conceivable detail to convey time and place was captured in the art direction and I fully understood why the cinematographer felt that his award was shared with the art director. As for sound, the first 20 minutes of the film had no dialogue and was an impressive soundscape of mood inducing music and detailed foley. It was truly brilliant.

I can understand that the film wasn't everybody's cup of tea since it was more character driven than plot. Still, Daniel Day Lewis was riveting. I think the film is like other great character studies that are gorgeously shot: Remains of the Day starring Anthony Hopkins and directed by James Ivory; Days of Heaven starring Sam Shepherd and directed by Terrence Malick; and of course Citizen Kane.

I highly recommend it (as if you didn't already guess). And seriously, what's not to love of the fact that Paul Thomas Anderson adapted a novel by Upton Sinclair:

quote:
September 20, 1878 – November 25, 1968), was a prolific American author who wrote over 90 books in many genres and was widely considered to be one of the best investigators, advocating socialist views. He achieved considerable popularity in the first half of the 20th century. He gained particular fame for his 1906 novel The Jungle, which dealt with conditions in the U.S. meat packing industry and caused a public uproar that partly contributed to the passage of the Pure Food and Drug Act and the Meat Inspection Act in 1906...

Wiki entry for Upton Sinclair


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Coyote
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posted 25 February 2008 05:45 PM      Profile for Coyote   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Boom Boom:

Good heavens! Why would you do such a thing?


To jump away from the bleak.

No, not Spice Girls of course. But something dumb and fun. Where things blow up, maybe.


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Michelle
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posted 26 February 2008 02:04 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
How the Oscars impeded organ transplants

quote:
As a fleet of jets carrying Hollywood North types flocked to Los Angeles for the Academy Awards, a true race-against-time thriller was unfolding off-screen.

The sudden death of a man in rural British Columbia last Thursday gave the B.C. Transplant Society mere hours to harvest the donor's healthy organs and get them to operating rooms in Vancouver.

So, just as it had done 23 times last year alone, B.C. Transplant went down its list of 11 jets-for-hire companies across the country and in the United States to charter a $15,000 flight to shuttle its organ-recovery surgeons to the remote locale and back.

Only this time, it wasn't going to be so simple.

“As a result of the Oscars going on in California, all of the corporate jets had been spoken for,” said Bill Barrable, executive director of B.C. Transplant. “We were in a situation where we could not secure a jet in the tight time frame that we needed to.”

Mr. Barrable said organs must be transplanted within four to six hours of being harvested, which also must be done relatively quickly for the organ to be functional in its new body.

Seven organs – and lives – were on the line.



From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
jrose
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posted 26 February 2008 06:35 AM      Profile for jrose     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oscars ratings sink to all-time low: figures
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