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Author Topic: Price of books
1234567
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posted 26 January 2008 08:47 AM      Profile for 1234567     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I often get gift certificates for book stores and so this week I went to one particular book store and wanted to purchase Ken Follett's latest book and I found that the mark up from the US price is quite high and I do not understand why? Isn't our dollar quite strong? Some one enlighten me on this please.
From: speak up, even if your voice shakes | Registered: Aug 2007  |  IP: Logged
Sven
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posted 26 January 2008 09:09 AM      Profile for Sven     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by 1234567:
I often get gift certificates for book stores and so this week I went to one particular book store and wanted to purchase Ken Follett's latest book and I found that the mark up from the US price is quite high and I do not understand why? Isn't our dollar quite strong? Some one enlighten me on this please.

Well, given the relative values of the USD and the CAN$, you're getting screwed...or, if you're paying the fair rate, Americans are getting a windfall.

I hope the USD stays where it is and doesn't strengthen for a while. It makes our products cheaper to Canadians and everyone else in the world. So, keep buying our stuff!!! (which, apparently, Canadians are doing in droves)...


From: Eleutherophobics of the World...Unite!!!!! | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
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posted 26 January 2008 09:43 AM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I was going to buy the very same book, 1234567, but didn't because of the price differential. It was released when the dollar was actually worth MORE than the U.S. dollar.

Someone else, however, gave it to me as a Christmas gift. Which of course you'd know, if you hung upon my every word here, as any reasoned person of good taste does.

I wrote a review on it. I attempted to find reasons to not like it, you know. But all the same, I couldn't put the darn thing down.

Get it on sale, and enjoy.

Oh, as far as why it's more, it's because of wanton gougery. The only defense is not to buy it. Or, if you don't like the pricing policy at "Chapters", go to their nearest competitor, "Indigo books" and see what their policy is.

Competition is what keeps these things from happening, thank goodness we don't stand for monopolies that add no value, but just increase prices here in Canada.

[ 26 January 2008: Message edited by: Tommy_Paine ]


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Sven
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posted 26 January 2008 11:07 AM      Profile for Sven     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
If I were in Canada, I'd just buy it online at a place like www.abebooks.com (a marketplace of thousands of booksellers). It it's an American bookseller, buy it with a credit card and you'll pay in CAN$ with a small exchange rate fee. Of course, the cost differential needs to be high enough to pay for the shipping cost (most sellers there are shipping books for about $3.50). So, it depends on the book's cost.
From: Eleutherophobics of the World...Unite!!!!! | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
abnormal
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posted 26 January 2008 03:16 PM      Profile for abnormal   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I've been buying from Amazon for years. Even figuring in exchange, shipping, and so forth it has been a much better deal than any Canadian store/site. Orders of magnitude.

The only things I've bought from a "real bookstore" tend to be shlock fiction that I need for my next flight.


From: far, far away | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 26 January 2008 04:15 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I buy all my books and CDs from Amazon.ca, their prices are pretty good, plus they carry used items as well. I've never had a problem with Amazon.

ETA: A lot of folks are selling used CDs on Amazon as "collector's items" and these tend to be grossly overpriced. Before buying anything used on Amazon, check other sites first.

[ 26 January 2008: Message edited by: Boom Boom ]


From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
bigcitygal
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posted 26 January 2008 04:19 PM      Profile for bigcitygal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Tommy P: Or, if you don't like the pricing policy at "Chapters", go to their nearest competitor, "Indigo books" and see what their policy is.

Um, they are the same store.

And also to amazon.ca supporters abnormal and Boom Boom:

Please. If you can afford to pay a few dollars extra, support independent booksellers, bricks and mortar or online. Thank you.

Bragging about shopping on amazon is the equivalent of saying what a nice meal you had at McDonald's the other night.


From: It's difficult to work in a group when you're omnipotent - Q | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
Chipo
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posted 26 January 2008 04:29 PM      Profile for Chipo        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by bigcitygal:

Bragging about shopping on amazon is the equivalent of saying what a nice meal you had at McDonald's the other night.


that sounds classist. not everyone can afford to eat at the Keg.


From: University | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged
Stephen Gordon
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posted 26 January 2008 04:33 PM      Profile for Stephen Gordon        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Boom Boom's village has something fewer than 200 souls, and is located many hundreds of kilometers away from the nearest independent bookstore.
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bigcitygal
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posted 26 January 2008 04:45 PM      Profile for bigcitygal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I understand that not everyone lives near a city/town that has an independent bookstore in it, but many, like the one Sven linked to, have online mail services.

My comparison to McD's is the chain connection, not the cheapness connection. The Keg is also a chain and I try to support individually owned businesses when I can.

Sorry to sound all preachy, old time babblers know this is a pet issue of mine. I'll bow out of this thread at this point.


From: It's difficult to work in a group when you're omnipotent - Q | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
Fidel
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posted 26 January 2008 04:52 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Boom Boom:

ETA: A lot of folks are selling used CDs on Amazon as "collector's items" and these tend to be grossly overpriced. Before buying anything used on Amazon, check other sites first

I bought a book recently, "Gardens of Imagination", a retro game programming book from 1994 for 12 cents. In the title of the ad, it said "book and disk." The book came in excellent shape except for the disk which was missing from the back of the book. I can't really complain about the price, and the missing source code is printed there in the pages of the book.

What you can do, I've noticed, is try to confirm with the seller that a CD or disk, whatever, is included and will be shipped to you before you go through with the transaction. Some sellers declare in the ad that disks and CD's may or may not be included with used books. Amazon usually has a "New" and "Used" category, and you're more likely to receive the original CD with a newer book ie. out of print books still in the original shrink wrap. But good idea to compare the same book price on other sites, or even a local used book store.


From: Viva La Revolución | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 26 January 2008 07:58 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Stephen Gordon:
Boom Boom's village has something fewer than 200 souls, and is located many hundreds of kilometers away from the nearest independent bookstore.

Make that thousands of kilometers from the nearest independent bookstore and you'd be about right.


From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Sven
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posted 26 January 2008 10:02 PM      Profile for Sven     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Another suggestion: Buy USED books. It's way cheaper than buying a new book. I buy a lot of used hardcover books that are in beautiful shape and are cheaper than current paperbacks of the same book (I just bought a book--in near-new condition--today for $5 + $3.95 S/H and a new copy of that book in paperback is about $15). Again (and, believe me, I'm not getting a commission!!), I use abebooks.com (an association of about 13,000 independent booksellers from around the globe) to find most used books. I still like to browse used book stores but that's really hit-n-miss (you might happen across something that's interesting--and that's fun). But, if you're looking for a specific used book in a particular condition, online is the way to go.
From: Eleutherophobics of the World...Unite!!!!! | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
1234567
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posted 27 January 2008 09:44 PM      Profile for 1234567     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I wrote a review on it. I attempted to find reasons to not like it, you know. But all the same, I couldn't put the darn thing down.

Get it on sale, and enjoy.


I am just about done reading Pillars of the Earth for the second time. I read it when it first came out and I absolutely loved it. Good to hear that the second one is just as good. I see that it's also a very big book with lots of pages.....delicious!


From: speak up, even if your voice shakes | Registered: Aug 2007  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
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posted 28 January 2008 02:02 PM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by bigcitygal:

Um, they are the same store.

And also to amazon.ca supporters abnormal and Boom Boom:

Please. If you can afford to pay a few dollars extra, support independent booksellers, bricks and mortar or online. Thank you.

Bragging about shopping on amazon is the equivalent of saying what a nice meal you had at McDonald's the other night.


*snicker* I know. I was being sardonically sarcastic.

The problem with supporting independent book sellers is that they are getting hard to find, and they are sometimes even frozen out of the market by the Chapters/Indigo monopoly, on certain books.


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
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posted 28 January 2008 02:14 PM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by 1234567:

I am just about done reading Pillars of the Earth for the second time. I read it when it first came out and I absolutely loved it. Good to hear that the second one is just as good. I see that it's also a very big book with lots of pages.....delicious!


I'm not sure this one has quite the depth as the first, but then I knew little about the engineering or architecture of Cathedrals when I read "Pillars of the Earth" for the first time. (it does stand up to multiple readings, doesn't it?) Where as I go into the second book knowing more about the history and events covered. Maybe that's why it doesn't seem as substantive as "Pillars" to me. And "World Without End" seemed a bit more soap opera-ish to me.

But, I couldn't put it down-- and when it was done, I read the Pullman books in quick succession.

I did, however, start Cormack McCarthy's "The Road" aside for a while. I'm just not in the mood for something quite that dark. Which is very odd for me, I never actually shy away from books for that reason.

I'm still going to buy and re-read his "Blood Meridian" again. I know I missed a whole lot with my first quick read back in November, when I was in St. Louis. And that's one dark, savage book, seemingly written by and for the misanthropic.

[ 28 January 2008: Message edited by: Tommy_Paine ]


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Lard Tunderin' Jeezus
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posted 28 January 2008 02:16 PM      Profile for Lard Tunderin' Jeezus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Sven:
Another suggestion: Buy USED books. It's way cheaper than buying a new book.
And it guarantees that no writer in the world will ever make a living.

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mudman
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posted 28 January 2008 02:20 PM      Profile for mudman        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yes LTJ. Buying new books also ensures logging companies will not go broke too.
From: toronto | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
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posted 28 January 2008 02:30 PM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Actually, if it's a new release, you won't find that great a price break at used book stores. Good prices, sure, but not that great.

I buy new and used. I tend to buy new if it's something current, for just the reason you site, Lard. If I enjoy something, I want the artist to profit, whether it's books or music or movies.

However, the issue gets a little cloudy sometimes with music and movies, and being gouged by Chapters.

But my personal library's used books are usually out of print stuff, or rare hard cover versions of paper backs I bought and read before. (Anthony Burgess'"Kingdom of the Wicked" filling both catagories at once) And, I'm not sure Catalus, Julius Ceaser, de Sade, Voltaire, Cicero, or even Marcus Aurelius are in any position to claim royalties, or even complain at the moment.

-----

Oh. Just remembered something. The underlying issue on the pricing of books is fair exchange between the U.S. and Canadian dollars. While I haven't checked the business news today, I suspect the Looney is near par with the greenback.

The toll for the tunnel between Windsor and the Motor City Madhouse is a dollar more in Canadian funds.

[ 28 January 2008: Message edited by: Tommy_Paine ]


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Sven
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posted 28 January 2008 09:10 PM      Profile for Sven     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Tommy_Paine:
Actually, if it's a new release, you won't find that great a price break at used book stores. Good prices, sure, but not that great.

That's probably true. But, exercise a little "delayed gratification" and the price of a used copy (relative to a new copy) will drop significantly. If one simply must get a new release as soon as it's available...well, you'll have to pay the price.

ETA: For example, "Born Standing Up" was published in late November 2007. Cover price is $25. Amazon price is $15. You can get a good used copy for about $7.

[ 28 January 2008: Message edited by: Sven ]


From: Eleutherophobics of the World...Unite!!!!! | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
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posted 29 January 2008 02:00 AM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Unfortunately, I won't have much time for books, as I will be using right wing ideology to solve my toll issues by making my own tunnel under the Detroit river for the next couple of years.
From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Lard Tunderin' Jeezus
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posted 29 January 2008 06:03 AM      Profile for Lard Tunderin' Jeezus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by mudman:
Yes LTJ. Buying new books also ensures logging companies will not go broke too.
Somehow, I don't see literacy as a major environmental challenge. Perhaps its a weakness on my part.

From: ... | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Sven
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posted 29 January 2008 06:05 AM      Profile for Sven     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Lard Tunderin' Jeezus:
Somehow, I don't see literacy as a major environmental challenge. Perhaps its a weakness on my part.

So, as a general proposition, you must believe that libraries and used bookstores (at least in so far as they carry anything more than the works of dead writers) are a bad thing?


From: Eleutherophobics of the World...Unite!!!!! | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Lard Tunderin' Jeezus
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posted 29 January 2008 06:10 AM      Profile for Lard Tunderin' Jeezus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
You have nothing positive to contribute, Sven. You really should think about why you are here.
From: ... | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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posted 29 January 2008 06:50 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I've already said this in the other thread, but your personal attacks are out of line, LTJ. Sven has done nothing wrong in this thread. There is certainly no consensus on the left about whether buying things new or used is acceptable, and that includes books.
From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 29 January 2008 07:22 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I wonder, in a socialist economy, would authors be paid by the state, and then their books distributed free to libraries? I wonder how this would work, given that some authors command a premium for their output, while some might receive considerably less. As it is, it seems a tremendous waste to have in some cases hundreds of thousands of books unsold and remainered for a considerable discount.
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Sven
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posted 29 January 2008 09:32 AM      Profile for Sven     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Boom Boom:
I wonder, in a socialist economy, would authors be paid by the state, and then their books distributed free to libraries? I wonder how this would work, given that some authors command a premium for their output, while some might receive considerably less. As it is, it seems a tremendous waste to have in some cases hundreds of thousands of books unsold and remainered for a considerable discount.

I think that (authors paid by the state) would be true in a communist society but a socialist society, at least as I understand it, still has a significant free market component.

In any event, having the state decide who gets paid to be an author (and, hence, decide what gets written) is Orwellian.


From: Eleutherophobics of the World...Unite!!!!! | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
mudman
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posted 29 January 2008 10:18 AM      Profile for mudman        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Does anyone know if e-books have impacted paper books? Also do authors get paid the same for e-books?
From: toronto | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 29 January 2008 10:53 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Sven:
I think that (authors paid by the state) would be true in a communist society but a socialist society, at least as I understand it, still has a significant free market component.

That's actually what I thought, but I wasn't sure. That would still allow for tremendous waste of resources in unsold print materials. Perhaps all that unsold stuff is simply shredded and recycled.


From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Sven
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posted 29 January 2008 02:34 PM      Profile for Sven     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by mudman:
Does anyone know if e-books have impacted paper books? Also do authors get paid the same for e-books?

I would imagine so, particularly if the e-book is a Microsoft Reader-enabled (or similar) device (the publishers no doubt have contracts with Microsoft to address royalties and so forth).


From: Eleutherophobics of the World...Unite!!!!! | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Sean in Ottawa
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posted 30 January 2008 09:36 AM      Profile for Sean in Ottawa     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I used to publish books. The reason the US sourced bookos are cheaper is the same reason I had to shut down my company. Canada Post's insanity when it comes to shipping rates and the neglect of the Canadian government, the public or the press to give a damn.

We are the only country in the Western world without a book or printed paper category for shipping. (We are also the only post office to use deep discounts to volume shippers below cost offest by smaller volume shippers - a sort of made-in-Canada reverse-Robin Hood policy.)

Shipping to Canada from outside is still fairly cheap - so things coming straight from US moving at US postal rates. I stopped publishing when it became so much cheaper to ship a book to Hawai from Ottawa than Winnipeg from Ottawa (one of many examples).

Our booksellers are forced to buy their US published books from Canadian distributors which is not a bad policy in one respect but when Canada Post takes its 20 pounds of flesh, the book cost landed in the bookstore is hugely different.

If you want to be able to go to a Canadian bookstore and buy a book for the price an American goes into a store there for, then you need to press the Canadian government to demand that Canada Post give us a book rate equivalent to that in the US. If the private US post office can do it, the public Canadian one should be able to.

I went to a meeting with Canada Post officials at the defunct postal council back in 1999 and was told that according to canada Post "We don't care if we are shipping books or screw drivers" The US postal service does care and it costs a lot less to send a book there than it does a screwdriver.

There is your reason. Call your MP. I tried to get press on this story back in 1993 when our shipping rates went up over 1000% (no typo - this was the ending of the Canadian Book rate that was better than the current US one- so we went from way better than the US to way worse almost overnight) with less than 4 weeks notice but was told it was not an important story.

Essentially this put the entire Canadian book industry on welfare by taking the market away. Good for established publishers as it is almost impossible for new ones to enter the industry-- how do you survive the floor performance when you sell every book at a loss? You can only make money with grants or crap best-seller material that ships in such high volume that you can get a break on the shipping. Gives the government an opportunity to have some control over what sorts of things you publish (and you thought this was a free country???). You may have noticed after that that there are fewer non-fiction books being published- this is because the granting agencies want literature only -- not stuff that gives people pause for thought on social policy (that might be uncanadian).

Of course since the publishers make their money per book via grants- even if they do not sell, where does this leave authors who need to make their money on royalties based on how many sell? -- yep screwed. It is the Canadian way. As for national unity and the idea that we should read Canadian culture- yep screwed. But if you know the right people that helps in the granting process.

Our book policy in this country is sick bullshit.

Anyway, now you know why we pay more in a Canadian bookstore: it is so that the government of Canada can have more countrol over what kinds of books are published here and so that Canada Post can make a buck so that they can deeply discount the admail they deliver to the door.

Feel Better? Well after 7 years out of the business I am still pissed. (You got me started...)

[ 30 January 2008: Message edited by: Sean in Ottawa ]

[ 30 January 2008: Message edited by: Sean in Ottawa ]


From: Ottawa | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
Sven
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posted 30 January 2008 12:22 PM      Profile for Sven     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Sean in Ottawa:
If the private US post office can do it, the public Canadian one should be able to.

I went to a meeting with Canada Post officials at the defunct postal council back in 1999 and was told that according to canada Post "We don't care if we are shipping books or screw drivers" The US postal service does care and it costs a lot less to send a book there than it does a screwdriver.


That’s the beauty of competition. The US Postal Service once had a government monopoly on shipping. Service sucked and the “We don’t care” attitude prevailed because...well, shippers and consumers had no choice but to use them. So, it was the “USPS way or the highway”.

Now, the USPS is required to compete with other package companies and, by law, the USPS must cover its costs (no separate federal funding to support the operation of the USPS). So, in order to attract shippers and consumers (and, hence, to survive), the USPS must change to respond to the market needs (like offering Saturday services at Post Offices, having Saturday deliveries, extra hours at the holiday, and a long list of other things that the USPS is doing to make its services valuable and convenient to shippers and consumers).

The “media rate” service offered by the USPS is great. Very low rates. The shipping time is, as a consequence, slower. But, unless you need to have a book immediately, just wait an extra week or so and you save big. I use it all the time.

If you have a large government bureaucracy with no competitors, all you get is the “We don’t care” attitude...and you can’t do a gawd damned thing about it.


From: Eleutherophobics of the World...Unite!!!!! | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
mudman
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posted 30 January 2008 12:30 PM      Profile for mudman        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
RE: Canada Post. I never dealt with ruder, stupider, slower, "couldn't-care-less" people in my life, especially at the branch in 1st Canadian Place (Toronto). Boy would they shit their pants if they were privatized.
From: toronto | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged
RosaL
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posted 30 January 2008 12:35 PM      Profile for RosaL     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by mudman:
RE: Canada Post. I never dealt with ruder, stupider, slower, "couldn't-care-less" people in my life, especially at the branch in 1st Canadian Place (Toronto). Boy would they shit their pants if they were privatized.

Yeah, then you could pay them low wages and threaten them with job loss! No union, either!

[ 30 January 2008: Message edited by: RosaL ]


From: the underclass | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged
Sven
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posted 30 January 2008 01:29 PM      Profile for Sven     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by RosaL:
Yeah, then you could pay them low wages and threaten them with job loss! No union, either!

The USPS employees remain unionized. You can privatize an organization without getting rid of unions.


From: Eleutherophobics of the World...Unite!!!!! | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
RosaL
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posted 30 January 2008 01:34 PM      Profile for RosaL     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Sven:

The USPS employees remain unionized. You can privatize an organization without getting rid of unions.


Yes, I think I'd heard that somewhere. Public sector unions do tend to be powerful, though. (In any case, as I'm sure you're aware, I was being sarcastic.)

ETA: I have had some appalling experiences with UPS by the way.

[ 30 January 2008: Message edited by: RosaL ]


From: the underclass | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged
1234567
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posted 30 January 2008 01:41 PM      Profile for 1234567     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Thank you Sean in Ottawa for that interesting read. NO wonder postal workers go "postal", I would too if I worked for an organization that made dumbass decisions like Canada Post does.
From: speak up, even if your voice shakes | Registered: Aug 2007  |  IP: Logged
Sven
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posted 30 January 2008 02:11 PM      Profile for Sven     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by 1234567:
Thank you Sean in Ottawa for that interesting read. NO wonder postal workers go "postal", I would too if I worked for an organization that made dumbass decisions like Canada Post does.

Wait a sec...are you saying they "go postal" in Canada, too?? I thought that was strictly a US phenomenon.


From: Eleutherophobics of the World...Unite!!!!! | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
RosaL
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posted 30 January 2008 02:13 PM      Profile for RosaL     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Sven:

Wait a sec...are you saying they "go postal" in Canada, too?? I thought that was strictly a US phenomenon.


It is. But we're so colonized people lose sight of these things.


From: the underclass | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged
1234567
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posted 30 January 2008 02:38 PM      Profile for 1234567     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yes, let the colonizers be colonized!
From: speak up, even if your voice shakes | Registered: Aug 2007  |  IP: Logged
RosaL
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posted 30 January 2008 02:44 PM      Profile for RosaL     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by 1234567:
Yes, let the colonizers be colonized!

The colonizers in Canada always were colonized, first by Britain, and now by the U.S. I find myself unable to rejoice in it since it affects all of us who live here.


From: the underclass | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged
1234567
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posted 30 January 2008 02:45 PM      Profile for 1234567     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Aboriginals were affected by colonizers over 100 years ago. Now you know how we feel.
From: speak up, even if your voice shakes | Registered: Aug 2007  |  IP: Logged
RosaL
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posted 30 January 2008 02:47 PM      Profile for RosaL     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by 1234567:
Aboriginals were affected by colonizers over 100 years ago. Now you know how we feel.

This isn't my country in any real sense of the word. I just live here. (And I come from a colonized country.)

[ 30 January 2008: Message edited by: RosaL ]


From: the underclass | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged
1234567
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posted 30 January 2008 02:53 PM      Profile for 1234567     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well, not all of it is ours, meaning my people but we are trying to save land up here. But it's difficult. There is a law that says we can't stop prospector's so up here we have to really fight because they are going steamroll over some of the most beautiful land you have ever seen in your life. Anyway, I am drifting. Sorry.
From: speak up, even if your voice shakes | Registered: Aug 2007  |  IP: Logged
RosaL
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posted 30 January 2008 03:02 PM      Profile for RosaL     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by 1234567:
Well, not all of it is ours, meaning my people but we are trying to save land up here. But it's difficult. There is a law that says we can't stop prospector's so up here we have to really fight because they are going steamroll over some of the most beautiful land you have ever seen in your life. Anyway, I am drifting. Sorry.

To pursue the drift :-) that's happening here too. The oil companies want the oil that's in first nations land.


From: the underclass | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged
Sean in Ottawa
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posted 31 January 2008 05:52 AM      Profile for Sean in Ottawa     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
To continue the drift...
Time to make the territories provinces.

Provinces have local control over their own resources and quite a share (ask Alberta about that). The north because they are territories does not have that so theya re second class Canadians. Why should the South get to have their way with the resources fo the north?

At the very least the resources of Nunavut should be restricted to First Nations authorities.--


From: Ottawa | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
rural - Francesca
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posted 31 January 2008 05:55 AM      Profile for rural - Francesca   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
interstingt - can you start a whole new thread on that concept, I'm not well versed in the governing distinctions and would love to learn more
From: the backyard | Registered: Dec 2007  |  IP: Logged
1234567
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posted 31 January 2008 06:26 AM      Profile for 1234567     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
We are talking devolution up here in the territories but it is very expensive. There are only 40,000 people up here and it is a vast land. How are we to take care of it? We would shoulder the responsibility for alot. Personally I would like to see the Feds take a little less of the pie to allow us to build roads, housing, etc. Devolution is not the answer right now even though we are resource rich.

[ 31 January 2008: Message edited by: 1234567 ]


From: speak up, even if your voice shakes | Registered: Aug 2007  |  IP: Logged
Sean in Ottawa
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posted 31 January 2008 07:04 AM      Profile for Sean in Ottawa     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Why not devolve if this measn transfers and the use of resources for the region? Vast as the area is would there not be enough resources to cover the costs?
From: Ottawa | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
thothle.ca
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posted 31 January 2008 05:51 PM      Profile for thothle.ca        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Don't want to toot my own horn, but if you use a price comparison site like Thothle.ca US / Can price is no longer an issue.

[ 31 January 2008: Message edited by: thothle.ca ]


From: Ottawa | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged

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