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Author Topic: Do people inspect your bookshelves when they visit?
Michelle
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posted 12 November 2007 03:40 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Do you inspect other people's bookshelves when you visit them?

I've never been very critical about people's bookshelves and what's on them. If people inspect mine, they'll find everything from philosophy texts and classics (most of which I haven't read in their entirety), to religious stuff from that stage of my life, to trash like V.C. Andrews from another stage of my life.

I refuse to hide any of my books away, even the trash. I don't care what people think of my shelves, and actually, I kind of like the idea of people possibly being scandalized by some of it.


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Stargazer
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posted 12 November 2007 05:23 AM      Profile for Stargazer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
All the time. I inspect people's bookshelves as well. You can tell a lot about someone by what they read, watch and listen to so I'm all about checking out the tunes and the movies too.

I would never date a man who doesn't read. And I find it odd when people say they don't like music.


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Michelle
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posted 12 November 2007 05:52 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Heh. I think you'll find more "Blue's Clues" and "Barney" than anything when it comes to my video collection. I almost never buy videos. I bought a bunch of crappy, campy $1 videocassettes from Sam's when they went under, but more for the kitsch than anything, and I haven't watched most of them yet (months later). Can't afford to buy movies.

As for music? I download pretty much all of it these days. So unless you get into my computer, you won't see my music collection.

My book shelves reflect a "younger me", not a current me. I don't buy many books these days - I take them out of the library. So most of the books I've read in the last five years or so are not on my bookshelves.


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Farmpunk
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posted 12 November 2007 06:34 AM      Profile for Farmpunk     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I inspect people's bookshelves, usually secretly. The quesiton then becomes whether or not to actually discuss what's on the shelves. Some people are really defensive about their reading tastes. Usually I just try and determine if the person has actually read the books they own.

People check out my book collection all the time. It's hard to miss at my place because there are booksheleves built into the walls of each room (excluding the bathroom), and are full.
My friends refer to my place as The Library.


Like Michelle, I've started using the library much more. The cost of books was a factor, plus I was running out of space. Mostly I buy Canadian small press fiction these days.


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Geneva
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posted 12 November 2007 06:38 AM      Profile for Geneva     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I wish people would look, actually, most do not really

with more living space, I have finally been able to pull everything - everything -- out of old boxes and display on tall book shelves:
everything from pre-Socratic summaries from undergrad classes, to tasters' illustrated guide to wines most recently

at least 50 percent politics and philosophy with gusts through English lit, French culture, history, religion, sports


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Michelle
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posted 12 November 2007 06:38 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I haven't read all my books. The complete works of Plato, which I had to buy in university? Ha! I don't frigging think so. And I admit it freely when people ask, with wonder, "Wow, have you read all these?" Um, no. No I have not.
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Geneva
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posted 12 November 2007 06:40 AM      Profile for Geneva     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
subject for another discussion: what percentage of the books displayed have you never (entirely) read?

A.: a lot more than I would want to admit!


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oldgoat
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posted 12 November 2007 06:44 AM      Profile for oldgoat     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I haven't even unpacked all my books from when I moved two years ago.

A lot of my books are reference, so I don't really read them all. I inherited a lot of books which are quite old, and are classics of sorts I guess. I do flip through those, like Sir Walter Scott's poetry, and that sort of thing. I have a set of encyclopedia from the late 1800's that I don't put to serious scholastic use of course, but it's fun to flip through.


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radiobirdman
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posted 12 November 2007 07:11 AM      Profile for radiobirdman     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It usually depends on whose home I'm in. If it's someone I'm interested in getting to know better, then a bookshelf makes for a great conversation starter. I frequently trade books back and forth between friends, so it's also a great way to find new reading material.
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N.Beltov
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posted 12 November 2007 07:17 AM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Following a home invasion, a police officer examined/glanced at my bookshelves during the course of an interview. He saw the spine of my copy of William Shirer's The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich and gave me a strange look. Shirer's book has a swastika on the spine.

I am now in the habit of turning some of my books around so that they cannot be identified without pulling them off the shelf.


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Rand McNally
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posted 12 November 2007 07:18 AM      Profile for Rand McNally     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Always, the bookshelf is one of the first things I look at. My wife has gotten mad at me because at parties when we are suppose to be still chatting up the host and the like, I am off scoping out the bookshelves. Not is only a good way to learn at the owners, I also find out if they have anything I want to borrow.

I will also admit that I assume other do the same, and therefore I have edited the content of my more visible bookshelves before people have come over. I try and tailor the contents for the people that are coming. I am always a bit surprised by the numbers of people that don't check out the bookshelves during their visit.


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farnival
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posted 12 November 2007 07:26 AM      Profile for farnival     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
i love checking out other people's bookshelves, and asking them about them. often when you do, the offer to borrow one is forthcoming, which i tend to decline as i'm pretty hard on books, carting them around with me whatever i'm doing, and would rather trash my own than someone else's.

my books are mostly on display, and my favorite part is after having a party ( a fairly regular occurance) seeing which ones have been pulled and are laying around the next day. i have a great deal of pirate, map, and sailing books and invariably they are the ones out. yar!

i had a great discussion years ago with the duct cleaning guy who came to the rental i was living at in winnipeg. he saw my bookshelf while waiting for his partner to set something up and had a fine discussion on the differences between Leary and Kesey and their respective approaches, and found out he was a caver. would have never happened without the bookshelf.


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Michelle
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posted 12 November 2007 07:29 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by N.Beltov:
I am now in the habit of turning some of my books around so that they cannot be identified without pulling them off the shelf.

There's only one book on my shelf that I'm tempted to do that with. A friend of mine gave it to me because she was packing away a ton of books and other stuff. I have no idea where she got it, but I was looking through her shelf, it caught my eye and I took it off her shelf and started to look at it and she told me to take it.

It's an autobiography of Xaviera Hollander, and it's called "The Happy Hooker"!


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N.Beltov
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posted 12 November 2007 07:38 AM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Books like that I keep, um, in the bedroom. I'm more likely to be reading them in that room anyway.
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Michelle
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posted 12 November 2007 07:55 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Heh. It's actually not just whacking material - it really is her autobiography although, of course, there are sex scenes in it, as you might imagine.

It certainly won't be winning any literary awards, though, that's for sure.


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N.Beltov
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posted 12 November 2007 08:03 AM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Whoops! I lied. My copies of Alberto Manguel's anthologies of erotic short fiction are on the shelf in the living room. As is Roger Angell's collection of love stories from the New Yorker. Now you've done it! I'll have to re-organize EVERYTHING!!
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RosaL
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posted 12 November 2007 08:06 AM      Profile for RosaL     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I think it's because I look at other people's bookshelves that I assume they are looking at mine! Books are very revealing, not just of who you are but, as someone pointed out, of your history.

At one time, I tried to maintain a kind of division: books that were more or less generally "acceptable" in the living room, political books along with books I read when I was younger in my bedroom and "office". The situation was further complicated by the fact that I also used to conceal some books from my political friends! I think it's obvious how ridiculous all this was.

Lately, this system has been breaking down - my political books have spilled over into the living room - and probably this reflects not only lack of space but an unwillingness to conceal parts of who I am.

ETA: Now I've revealed how utterly boring I am: I keep (books by)Lenin in my bedroom rather than erotic literature

[ 12 November 2007: Message edited by: RosaL ]


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N.Beltov
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posted 12 November 2007 08:19 AM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
You could create a section of "dangerous" books and include Lenin, Salman Rushdie, Charles Darwin and any erotica you have lying about. Now that would get the attention of your guests ... and they would be confused about your intentions and orientation. Heheh.
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RosaL
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posted 12 November 2007 08:28 AM      Profile for RosaL     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by N.Beltov:
You could create a section of "dangerous" books and include Lenin, Salman Rushdie, Charles Darwin and any erotica you have lying about. Now that would get the attention of your guests ... and they would be confused about your intentions and orientation. Heheh.

Excellent idea! I could put some theology in there, too. heh.


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N.Beltov
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posted 12 November 2007 08:35 AM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Here's a good article to leave lying on your coffee table for those annoying visitors who won't leave.
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Catchfire
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posted 12 November 2007 09:36 AM      Profile for Catchfire   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I definitely inspect people's bookshelves, if they sport them, but if they don't read I won't hold it against them. I used to harshly judge people who had, say, Matchbox 20 albums on their shelves (and I'd lie if I said that I didn't feel a candle of respect for such a person flicker and die with that revelation) but people can surprise you. In fact, just because someone has James Joyce on their shelves is no get out of jail free card.

As for my own shelves, I do confess a guilty, materialist pride in having them filled (why else are bookshelves customarily in the "public" living rooms as opposed to the private bedrooms, or even in broom closets--could you imagine?) But I'm more boastful of my graphic novels and hardboiled fiction collection than my theory or high literature books--either because they afford me street-level cred or because I actually enjoy them more.

But it's definitely a weird thing, bookshelves. I agree that they reveal a lot about someone, but I don't think one's cultural taste is the alpha and omega of character judgement. (As for the bedroom talk, I've tried reading passages of The Communist Manifesto and The German Ideology to my partner in the late evening, but it hasn't quite worked so far. Revolution ain't what it used to be, I guess.)


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Michelle
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posted 12 November 2007 09:49 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Catchfire, you might do better by donning a black turtleneck and reading some existentialist stuff to your sweetheart. Be sure to have just the right level of angst in your voice as you read. Drives 'em wild every time.
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M.Gregus
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posted 12 November 2007 10:28 AM      Profile for M.Gregus     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I had a roommate who tried to subvert perceptions of our bookshelves by stocking them with classic self-help literature along the lines of How to Win Friends and Influence People, The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, etc. I'm not sure how to judge the results because no one ever commented, probably because they were too polite.
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Sean in Ottawa
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posted 12 November 2007 11:18 AM      Profile for Sean in Ottawa     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I have my Library in the basement- since there is always mess there between the bottom of the stairs and the books-- you have to be trusted to ever see it-- but I will bring up books I think visitors might be interested in.
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Tommy_Paine
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posted 12 November 2007 11:58 AM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I always look at people's book shelves.

Most of the books Rebecca and I have don't fit on the shelves we have, so they are downstairs in safe storage for the time being.

I do have rules on what I display. I do not display books I have not read-- the exception being the odd book that I intend to read. I have one on the shelf at the moment.

I do not care that people will see my two thick books by de Sade, nor other libertine works, or a few works of erotica that I have among those Anais Nin, and those spankarific books by Anne Rice, and a collection of poetry by Catalus.

Of the three daughters from my first marriage, all officially claim this house as their residence. However, all but one actually resides here, and she has some concrete plans to move out in the new year. This will finally open up another room that we will convert into a study/ guest room-- or maybe just a study. Then we'll have room, I think, to unstore the other books.

I'm sure there are scores that Rebecca has that I have not yet seen, and I will be able to read them.


quote:
He saw the spine of my copy of William Shirer's The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich and gave me a strange look. Shirer's book has a swastika on the spine.

I have, somewhere kicking around, a fairly good biography of Adolf Hitler. These types of books are the only ones that give me a twinge of trepidation about displaying, but in the end, I would.

If I could find the damn thing.


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Stargazer
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posted 12 November 2007 01:12 PM      Profile for Stargazer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
hey good thread!

I never hide any of my books. I had such amazing books prior to my move back from Winnipeg (boxes upon boxes of collector books gone). Now I have three full book shelves and they contain everything from the erotic arts to The Vertical Mosaic. I also have graphic novels (autographed) and weird counter culture books like Crispin Glover's What It Is?


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farnival
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posted 12 November 2007 01:38 PM      Profile for farnival     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Stargazer:
hey good thread!

I never hide any of my books. I had such amazing books prior to my move back from Winnipeg (boxes upon boxes of collector books gone). Now I have three full book shelves and they contain everything from the erotic arts to The Vertical Mosaic. I also have graphic novels (autographed) and weird counter culture books like Crispin Glover's What It Is?


ahhhh, the same thing happened when i moved from winnipeg to toronto. if it didn't fit in my van it didn't come. the guideline i used for books and vinyl was: will i think its cool i kept this when i'm 80. it was harsh, and my friends were more than happy to help with the reduction.

one of the keepers, a first edition of Hunter S. Thompson's "Hell's Angels", hardcover with black fabric and a red and silver embossed cover and ragged edged pages. sweet.

stargazer, did you happen to see Crispin's weird multimedia show a ways back at the Pyramid? he read selections from his book for housewives from the 1800's he edited by blanking out words into a handbook on ratcatching. woo.

so, regarding hiding books, does anyone leave books out that may be controversial, to see if they are commented on? (sort of like the usurper previously mentioned, but more blatant)


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Michelle
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posted 12 November 2007 01:56 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I can't really leave out "controversial" ones for fear my son will see them and go home and tell his dad about them, and then I'll be accused of exposing him to inappropriate stuff.

So, The Hairy Pothead remains at work, where I read it on my breaks and where visitors to my office get a kick out of it. (I have it displayed on my bulletin board - no, no holes in it, Dana!) And I've hidden my Black Bastard comics, bought at Word on the Street from the most awesome book salesperson I've ever encountered. (He is the author and artist and really funny.)

Maybe someday when my kid is older, I'll feel free to leave them out.


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Stargazer
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posted 12 November 2007 02:51 PM      Profile for Stargazer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
stargazer, did you happen to see Crispin's weird multimedia show a ways back at the Pyramid? he read selections from his book for housewives from the 1800's he edited by blanking out words into a handbook on ratcatching. woo.

No but I wish I had. I saw him at the Festival of Fear in Toronto. He had his show at the Bloor Cinema ,which I missed (I am still kicking myself for that one). I did get the photograph with him as well as What It Is? autographed. He is a strange cat in real life.

Nice find on the Hell's Angels book. I read the soft cover.

I don't really have any books I am afraid people will see. I do have the Redneck Manifesto, but that is because I really like the counter culture books. I'm not too worried about that one because it was worth reading, even though I did not agree with his rant.

My books are pretty much a reflection of me, and I like that.


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arborman
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posted 13 November 2007 02:18 PM      Profile for arborman     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I make a point of scanning bookshelves when I visit people - usually to see if I can deduce anything about their interests.

And the typical collection of Arts undergrad type books tells me nothing (i.e. Plato). But a complete set of Philip K. Dick books would tell me we have something on common, for example. And a set of books about something quirky or unique would give me something to ask them about in conversation - i.e. a lot of books on lepidoptery or Scots tartans or Central European military history or Mayan architecture.

My partner despairs at my tendency to induct 1-2 books to the house every week, as our limited bookshelf space is already completely maxed out, with books triple stacks, piled on top, and stacked on various tables. Such is life with me.

On occasion I have felt very uncomfortable while visiting a house, and only later realized that I was uncomfortable with the place (and its occupants) because it held no books whatsoever.


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RosaL
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posted 13 November 2007 02:33 PM      Profile for RosaL     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I used to clean houses for rich people. It took me awhile before I realized they had no book-cases! Then I noticed how few books they had - maybe a "block-buster" or two and that would be it. They had a lot of money but were culturally poor. (I realize this isn't true of all rich people!)
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jrose
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posted 13 November 2007 02:39 PM      Profile for jrose     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I think bookshelves often represent who we are – and who we WANT to be. People who look at mine would think I was far better-read, with an interest in a far-wider range of genres, than I have actually gotten around to. Those books on my shelves that are collecting dust, that I have yet to get around to, are often ambitious purchases that I hope to one day find the time to read.

But overall, yes, I'm guilty of this snooping, and I think rightfully so! Just as I watch which section of a bookstore, movie store or music store my friends go to when we're shopping together. Half snobbery, half curiousity!


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Lard Tunderin' Jeezus
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posted 13 November 2007 03:00 PM      Profile for Lard Tunderin' Jeezus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I've read almost every book I've ever bought. Looking at my bookshelf, I count only 4 books out of a couple of hundred that I haven't read - and they were all gifts, that I keep telling myself I should read one day, to try to figure out why those people chose them for me.

Strange that someone who tells you they couldn't buy you a shirt because they don't know your tastes would think that they could buy you a book, isn't it?


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Boom Boom
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posted 13 November 2007 03:06 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I have about 250 books that I brought for two college diplomas and two university degrees that I used only once, maybe twice, and which I never read all the way through. I keep them on hand for occasional reference.
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Michelle
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posted 13 November 2007 03:06 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Stargazer:
I don't really have any books I am afraid people will see. I do have the Redneck Manifesto, but that is because I really like the counter culture books. I'm not too worried about that one because it was worth reading, even though I did not agree with his rant.

Oh yeah, that reminds me, I have one or two Ayn Rand books. I always leave them out on my bookshelf just to confuse people. And yes, I've read them!


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kropotkin1951
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posted 13 November 2007 03:23 PM      Profile for kropotkin1951   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Back when I was just starting in the workforce one of my "first trades" was blasting. I have always kept my CIL Blaster's Handbook in my left wing political ideology section.

When my spouse and I merged our lives and bookcases we discovered we had many books that we both owned. We also found that between us we had 7 or 8 Farley Mowat books but not a single double.

Our library has a lot of history, especially labour and working people's history.


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Jingles
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posted 13 November 2007 04:48 PM      Profile for Jingles     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I worked cleaning carpets one summer, and one thing the struck me, and depressed me, was how few people even had books.

There was the everpresent television, and the omnipresent Disney VHS collection, but not a book to be found anywhere.

I know, many people keep books in a study, den, or office. But in many, nay most(I'd say 19/20), of those homes, books did not exist.

I wanna get books just to freak people out when they see them on the shelf, like "Mein Kampf" next to the "Left Behind" series, next to "Dianetics".


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laine lowe
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posted 13 November 2007 10:53 PM      Profile for laine lowe     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I inherited my parent's books, lots of them were history and philosophy series that I actually used and occasionally use these days. I also just love books and can't let go of any that I enjoyed so I have tons of fiction (hard cover and paperback). Plus I find the books I have from university are handy reference books. In the end, my place is bursting with books. I used to keep the comic books, paperbacks and childhood books in my bedroom but since painting the place, they are all packed away in boxes.

Work related books reside in two small bookshelves in my office. All the aforementioned and many novels and other books of interest reside in the living room bookshelves (although not organized like they used to be). The living room books include tons of history, philosophy, psychology, economics, political science, sociology, arts, geography and hard cover literature. (I also have Shirer's "Rise and Fall" and Anais Nin's illustrated "Delta of Venus" on those public shelves and never thought twice of hiding either or anything else.)

The place is frankly a fire hazard to tell the truth.

As for other people's places, I always check out their bookshelves. But I always check out their art work and photo graphs too. I figure they're on display to be looked at.


From: north of 50 | Registered: Dec 2006  |  IP: Logged
KenS
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posted 24 December 2007 09:36 AM      Profile for KenS     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
While I am always interested in what's on people's bookshelves, I guess I think it might be seen as prying to inspect too closely with people I don't know well. [And people I do know- well, that's not as interesting.]

The nature of my work I'm in a lot of people's houses when they aren't there. THEN I inspect the bookshelves, and if I've never even seen them it means I get to construct outlines of who they are.

I should say that I'm not judgmental by nature, and I tend to take personal asseeemnets I make as tentative even when they are based on more evidence than the books on their shelves. But that doesn't change the attraction of speculative constructs.

I had never thought about it before, but if you could seperate which books I owned, you'd probably be puzzled if you knew me. And if you didn't know me, your speculative construct would be nothing like me.

[ 24 December 2007: Message edited by: KenS ]


From: Minasville, NS | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
clersal
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posted 24 December 2007 10:49 AM      Profile for clersal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yes I always check peoples bookcases. Curious to see if I can find new authors that interest me.
I don't mind at all if people look at my books either.

From: Canton Marchand, Québec | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
bliter
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posted 24 December 2007 11:51 AM      Profile for bliter   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Am an avid reader and also a book pack rat, with most of my books in boxes. One on the shelf is Mein Kampf - that I haven't read. Some would be shocked, but I picked it up at a book swap at, of all places, a Canadian Legion.

Whether a book shelf, or a book being read on the bus, I have gone into contortions to read a title.


From: delta | Registered: Sep 2007  |  IP: Logged
clersal
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posted 24 December 2007 12:41 PM      Profile for clersal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yes I am an avid reader as well. I have four book cases, one in my bedroom for escapism literature which is about all I read now. Another that has burd books, art and everything in that genre.

Another that is in the hallway with a french and english encyclopedias plus a mish mash of others.

Finally another in the living room with books on psychology, all the books by Tory Hayden plus others.

Then the bags and boxes although every summer I attempt to sell a bunch at a small store in the village. I think there are a bunch in the barn too. I even discourage myself at times.

You made my think of the boxes bliter.

Nowadays I use the library which has cut
down on the hoarding.


From: Canton Marchand, Québec | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
rural - Francesca
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posted 01 January 2008 04:50 PM      Profile for rural - Francesca   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I keep my locally published books and all my signed books on my one loan book shelf (this thread has got me looking around the house to build more shelving so more books are out).

I do have a signed copy of "Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince" which is most prized book, and it just sits there with the rest of them.


From: the backyard | Registered: Dec 2007  |  IP: Logged
jrose
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posted 01 January 2008 05:01 PM      Profile for jrose     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Nowadays I use the library which has cut
down on the hoarding.

Me too! I've just rediscovered the library for the first time since high school. I forgot how much I loved having that access, and it's saving me quite a bit of money and keeping my bookshelves clean[er]!


From: Ottawa | Registered: Oct 2006  |  IP: Logged
triciamarie
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posted 02 January 2008 02:31 AM      Profile for triciamarie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by jrose:
I think bookshelves often represent who we are – and who we WANT to be.

For sure -- same as grocery baskets! It's good to have some reach I think, as long as too much of it doesn't go mouldy in the drawer so to speak. I do tend to pick up the heavier stuff later and give it a go, especially since I have stopped using the library so much -- not so distracted by those tasty new releases all the time.

Of course lots of it doesn't stand up on assessment years later.

Mind you, I once moved about twelve times in five years so the collection is pretty pared down comparatively. My rule is to give away or donate anything that I have already read and won't probably re-read or consult much, and don't want to pass on to my kids.

I'm also into art and design so that's another thing I'm interested in at other people's places.


From: gwelf | Registered: Jul 2006  |  IP: Logged

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