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Author Topic: What are you reading continued
clersal
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Babbler # 370

posted 12 September 2006 01:38 PM      Profile for clersal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I'm on a Minette Walters spree. At the moment it is Acid Row.
From: Canton Marchand, Québec | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Erstwhile
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Babbler # 4845

posted 12 September 2006 08:00 PM      Profile for Erstwhile     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Currently, the third book in George R.R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire series. Or more accurately re-reading it; I read it when it first came out a few years ago, and then got the fourth book for my birthday this year...except ol' George doesn't believe in "what has gone before" prologues and therefore I'm reading the series again to refresh my memory.

Of course the fifth book probably won't be out for a couple of years so I may just end up re-reading the bloody things in 2008.


From: Deepest Darkest Saskabush | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged
mayakovsky
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Babbler # 5171

posted 12 September 2006 10:44 PM      Profile for mayakovsky     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
'Brandenburg' by Henry Porter, a spy novel set around the time of the fall of the Berlin Wall. This is the third Porter novel I have read. Some people are calling him the new Le Carre. Speaking of which Le Carre has a novel due out this month!
From: New Bedford | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
eau
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Babbler # 10058

posted 12 September 2006 11:01 PM      Profile for eau        Edit/Delete Post
Thanks for the heads up on the new LeCarre. I have read them all. When he wrote "Our Game" about the tribal areas of Russia , it was amazingly insightful about the culture and customs especially considering recent events. But thats the beauty of LeCarre.

I did catch The Constant Gardener as a movie on TV last week. I loved the book and the movie was suprisingly good.


From: BC | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
rob.leblanc
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Babbler # 2475

posted 14 September 2006 06:18 AM      Profile for rob.leblanc     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Memoirs of a Geisha at the moment. Before that it was A Scanner Darkly by Phillip K. Dick, but none of them can beat Jonothan Strange & Mr. Norrel by Susanna Clarke.
From: Where am I? Where are YOU? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
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posted 17 September 2006 06:59 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I've mostly been reading magazines lately. I have two subscriptions and one I get from the newsstand, and they seem to take up most of my reading time. That, and occasionally vegan cookbooks when I want to try something new.
From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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Babbler # 560

posted 17 September 2006 07:00 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
P.S. If you don't mind, clersal, I think I'm going to move this to the babble book lounge forum, since it's about what people are reading rather than about what they're writing.
From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
jas
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posted 17 September 2006 01:53 PM      Profile for jas     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post

[ 18 September 2006: Message edited by: jas ]


From: the world we want | Registered: Jun 2005  |  IP: Logged
jas
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posted 17 September 2006 01:56 PM      Profile for jas     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
P.S. Michelle: just wondering why the Book Lounge comes under Rabble Content, since most of the books here have nothing to do with rabble content.
From: the world we want | Registered: Jun 2005  |  IP: Logged
Lard Tunderin' Jeezus
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posted 17 September 2006 06:33 PM      Profile for Lard Tunderin' Jeezus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I've just gotten into "A Brief History of the Birth of the Nazis", by Nigel Jones. I've read enough to understand how the Nazis came to power, but thought this might help explain how they actually came to be such people. Jones traces the Nazis to their roots in the Kaiser's Freikorps, and explains their evermore violent opposition to the nearly successful communist and socialist revolutionaries that grew more and more powerful in the post-WW1 republic.

I'm just a few chapters in, but so far it's fascinating reading.

[ 17 September 2006: Message edited by: Lard Tunderin' Jeezus ]


From: ... | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
morningstar
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posted 17 September 2006 07:50 PM      Profile for morningstar     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
has anyone read 'cosmos and the psyche' by richard tarnas? it was published in feb by viking but copies are difficult to find.
From: stratford, on | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged
kman242
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posted 18 September 2006 05:27 PM      Profile for kman242     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I have just finished reading Don't Believe It! How Lies Become News by Alexandra Kitty. It teaches one how to deconstruct a news story, shows how hoaxes, rumours, mistakes and propaganda could spread through reporter's or editor's laziness, lack of ethics or their personal agendas and biases. Consumer complacency is also blasted. I will never look at a news article or report the same way again. This is the kind of media literacy that kids need to be taught in schools in North America.
From: Alberta | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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Babbler # 560

posted 18 September 2006 07:09 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by jas:
P.S. Michelle: just wondering why the Book Lounge comes under Rabble Content, since most of the books here have nothing to do with rabble content.

Because rabble actually has a book lounge! With book reviews and everything! I've even written a couple of them! It's actually a lot more prominent on the front page now than it used to be, which is good, because there's a lot of really good, original rabble content in that section, and I'm glad it's got its own front page section instead of being hidden in back pages of babble.

However, I think Lisa (our book reviews editor, otherwise known as "Rundler" on babble) won't mind at all if we have book talks on books other than the ones featured in the book reviews section.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Catchfire
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posted 18 September 2006 07:44 PM      Profile for Catchfire   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I just went on a graphic novel kick, and here are some that blew my mind:

Paul Auster's City of Glass, one of my all-time favourite "normal" novels (and a classic detective story to boot) adapted by Paul Karasick and David Mazzucchelli (who did some art for Frank Miller's Batman years)

Louis Riel by Chester Brown. What a great way to learn about (kind of) Canadian History and a great figure. Not to mention how Sir John A. screwed the métis out of everything they had.

Persepolis, by Marjane Satrapi. An amazing and compelling look at the recent cultural history of Iran, Persepolis 2 is just as great.


From: On the heather | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged
Cameron W
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posted 19 September 2006 09:57 PM      Profile for Cameron W   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Adbusters Magazine and The Long Emergency by James Howard Kunstler.

Adbusters magazine is always excellent, and the Long Emergency so far has been a great book.

[ 20 September 2006: Message edited by: Cameron W ]


From: Left Coast | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged
Paul Gross
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posted 19 September 2006 10:32 PM      Profile for Paul Gross   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
James Howard Kunstler will be speaking in Ottawa on Friday.

Imagining a City Without Oil:
Friday, September 22nd, 7:00 pm
Adult High School, 300 Rochester

A talk by James Howard Kunstler, author of the Long Emergency and The Geography of Nowhere,

This event is co-sponsored with Councillor Clive Doucet and others. Cost. $10.00

Info: http://www.imagineottawa.ca


From: central Centretown in central Canada | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
mayakovsky
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posted 22 September 2006 04:35 PM      Profile for mayakovsky     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
eau, You're right about Le Carre, there is often great political criticism in the 'spy' genre. Its not all Clancy blow 'em up! Have you read Le Carre's non-fiction piece critiquing UK involvement in Iraq?


For those looking for some topical poetry: There is a new poetry anthology on 9/11 put out by nthposition.com poetry editor, Todd Swift. Link below. People might remember nthposition and Todd Swift from the collection '100 Poets Against the War'. There is a babbler in both collections.

http://nthposition.com/babylonburning911.php


From: New Bedford | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
Rundler
editor
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posted 25 September 2006 08:02 AM      Profile for Rundler     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Hey! Just responding to Michelle's post -- absolutely! I'm so excited that this forum is sometimes about reviews we've done, sometimes just about what people are reading like this one, sometimes about exciting book world scandals and such.

Just a reminder that if there are books you'd like to see reviewed, you can send suggestions to me at lisa@rabble.ca. We have pretty limited space but it's always excellent to know what might tickle your fancy.

Just about graphic novels (or fat comics), people might want to check out these two rabble reviews, both really helpful on the genre:

Six fat comics http://rabble.ca/reviews/review.shtml?x=50361

Show and tell http://rabble.ca/reviews/review.shtml?x=42183


From: the murky world of books books books | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged
Fidel
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Babbler # 5594

posted 25 September 2006 10:39 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
"The Singularity is Near: When Humans Transcend Biology", Ray Kurzweil

The future has not been written. There is no fate but what we make for ourselves. I wish I could believe that. -- John Connor, a character from the sci-fi movie, "T3"


From: Viva La Revolución | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
CharlotteAshley
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posted 27 September 2006 08:16 AM      Profile for CharlotteAshley   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I have been reading the "new" Gibbs translation of War and Peace over the last month or so. I know the last hundred years has been packed with people who've been thrusting this book in everyone else's face, but I'd like to be the latest: Read this book! It's so really rare to find a book that is so absolutely satisfactory on every level.

(Alright: Tolstoy has his moments of long-windedness about the nature of history or the spiritual condition of man, but that's very little to tolerate in exchange for everything else.)

I don't even know what to read next. It seems like anything fictional would just feel shallow and pale in comparison. I am considering Dumas' Voyage en Russie as a sort of W&P hangover cure, followed maybe by something non-fictional (Jared Diamond's Collapse has been taking up too much shelf space) so that I won't be tempted to make comparisons.

Charlotte


From: Toronto | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
Catchfire
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posted 27 September 2006 10:09 AM      Profile for Catchfire   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
The Greatest War & Peace hangover cure is The Master & Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov. Satan comes to Moscow and starts a magic show. It's hilarious, touching, tragic and magnificent. Read this book!
From: On the heather | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged
Lawrence Day
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posted 27 September 2006 08:42 PM      Profile for Lawrence Day     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I'm working through Fletcher Prouty's "The Secret Team" which was surpressed when it came out but is now available free on the net at:
http://www.bilderberg.org/cia.htm#ST
Col. Prouty is the Mr. X in Oliver Stone's JFK movie.

From: Toronto | Registered: Jun 2006  |  IP: Logged
jeff house
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Babbler # 518

posted 29 September 2006 09:42 AM      Profile for jeff house     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Charlotte mentions uncertainty over what to read after War and Peace.

After I read it, I read Resurrection, which I really liked.

Ten years later, I enjoyed Anna Karenina.

Take yer pick, they're both good.


From: toronto | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
sigridmac
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posted 29 September 2006 05:17 PM      Profile for sigridmac   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I'm reading my fourth book by Lisa Carey. This one is called Every Visible Thing. She writes wonderful, character driven stories and seems to be preoccupied with death, craziness and the afterlife. This one is about a family whose 15-year-old son gets up in the middle of the night and disappears, never to be seen again. The main story is about how the other siblings cope with this constantly "invisible" presence, trauma and loss. It's really good.

Sigrid


From: Ottawa | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged
Bobolink
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posted 30 September 2006 08:55 PM      Profile for Bobolink   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
Rereading The Day the Universe Changed by James Burke. Written as a companion to the BBC television series, it explores how our perception of relaity changes as knowledge changes. Although it was written in 1985, it is still relevent.

[ 30 September 2006: Message edited by: Bobolink ]


From: Stirling, ON | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
CharlotteAshley
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posted 07 October 2006 09:12 AM      Profile for CharlotteAshley   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I just finished reading _Farewell, My Lovely_ by Raymond Chandler - I picked it up on a whim, because it was small, simple and wouldn't be comparable to _War and Peace_ (see: above).

I have very little to say about the book itself. I don't see any real value in it except as a cultural artefact, a snapshot of what might have appealed to people seventy years ago. The "political incorrectness" by today's standards was absolutely jarring (offhand remarks about how "killing a nigger is just a misdemeanor", or the "Indian" character who speaks in stilted pseudo-english "Me Big Red. You come car now, huh.") But it did set me to thinking about another book-related incident a few years ago.

A gave my mother a copy of David Suzuki's _Good News For A Change_ years ago, and was saddened to find over the months that the book just sat on the shelf and my mother never really read it. When I asked her why, she told me that she didn't really see the point. her generation, she said, had fought all these battles already, and lost. They tried to exact cultural, social and environmental change and in the end - well, look where we are? It was all for nothing!

But reading Chandler, I see that she's absolutely wrong. Whatever fights still need to be fought now, the world is NOT, thank goodness, what it was 70 years ago. And it was my mother's generation that made the difference. Chandler wrote his racial stereotypes without a hint of cheek or self awareness. It wasn't something to think about, then. All I can say about this book is - I'm glad I wasn't then. I'm glad I am *now*.

Charlotte


From: Toronto | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
Catchfire
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posted 07 October 2006 10:52 AM      Profile for Catchfire   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Oh, youv'e picked the wrong author to attack here, Charlotte. No flame against Chandler will be allowed to stand.

Chandler's novels are definitely not mere escapist fiction. He is a master craftsman when it comes to prose. He's tight, musical and unapologetic. Youre wrong when you say he "wrote his racial stereotypes without a hint of cheek or self awareness." He knew exactly what he was doing, and probably was more aware than his more famous modernist contemporaries like F. Scott Fitzgerald.

His writing his urban, working class, ironic and deeply cynical about a changing modern landscape. He's one of the first to see America as an undeniably urban geography, and he's already articulating the alienation that accompanies urban sprawl, the social anxieties that touch women in public, and the cultural dperavities that result from homophobia and racism. You always make mistakes when you judge an author's morals by his work, and while difficult, it's important to understand that Raymond Chandler and Phillip Marlowe are not the same person.

I will defend Raymond Chandler to the death, even though, as the dick Marlowe would say, "It's not a game for Knights."


From: On the heather | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged
CharlotteAshley
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posted 07 October 2006 12:22 PM      Profile for CharlotteAshley   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Catchfire:
Oh, youv'e picked the wrong author to attack here, Charlotte. No flame against Chandler will be allowed to stand.

His writing his urban, working class, ironic and deeply cynical about a changing modern landscape. He's one of the first to see America as an undeniably urban geography, and he's already articulating the alienation that accompanies urban sprawl, the social anxieties that touch women in public, and the cultural dperavities that result from homophobia and racism. You always make mistakes when you judge an author's morals by his work, and while difficult, it's important to understand that Raymond Chandler and Phillip Marlowe are not the same person.


Of course... I didn't mean to post a critique of the Chandler or even of the book - I simply wondered at how far our cultural values have come since this book was published. Whether Chandler shared the opinions of his characters, or whether he was simply painting a portrait of a place and time, the society he describes (even aside from the stylized "noir") bears no resemblance to the one I know.

Even the most hard-boiled character in a story taking place in the 21st century won't run into pseudo-legal murders and earthy-smelling Indians being used as spiritual mediums. Or even black-only clubs or women who won't be convicted on account of their looks. Different world, we got here. Thank goodness.

Charlotte


From: Toronto | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
S.Inwald
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posted 23 February 2007 12:32 PM      Profile for S.Inwald     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I just read Chandler's Long Goodbye again, one of my all-time favorites. Still haven't seen the movie.

Right now I'm reading Secrets of the SuperOptimist by W.R. Morton and Nathaniel Whitten. It falls somewhere in the Venn Diagram of Dave Eggers, Nietsche, Steven Covey and Stephen Colbert. It's structured as a series of "secret" ways to reframe your thinking and turn any negative into a positive. It's hilarious, but each of the "secrets" also ends up having an underlying truth to it.

The book is part parody of self-help books, and part fully-fleshed-out philosophy combining existentialism, objectivism, Tony Robbins-ism, and.. clearly I don't know philosophy. I do know that I found it really funny and thought-provoking.

It's a quick read. I don't know if I've described it well but I recommend it highly.


From: Toronto | Registered: Feb 2007  |  IP: Logged
Polly Brandybuck
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posted 23 February 2007 09:10 PM      Profile for Polly Brandybuck     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I am reading my Grandmas journal/diary, what an amazing woman. Grandma died fourteen years ago, but apparently no one had the heart to go through all her things till now, and when they found the journal they thought I might like it. Wow...now I know where the female side of my family gets their strength from.

Grandma was "aristocracy" in Austria, emigrated to Canada with the man she loved that her family couldn't stand, had ten children (the ones who lived), raised them all in a three bedroom house on a stationmasters income---I swear, I will never again complain about the shitty water pressure here.

I am just blown away.


From: To Infinity...and beyond! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
mayakovsky
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posted 23 February 2007 10:48 PM      Profile for mayakovsky     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I am reading Sherry Simon's 'Translating Montreal'. I am on the section where she talks about one of my favourite poets AM Klein. Though this is an academic text I understand it has been selling quite well on the island of More-real.
From: New Bedford | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
Bobolink
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posted 24 February 2007 08:31 AM      Profile for Bobolink   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
I have just finished Leonardo's Mountain of Clams and the Diet of Worms by Stephen Jay Gould which is a collection of essays from Natural History magazine. Wonderful essays on life and evolution.
From: Stirling, ON | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
oreobw
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Babbler # 13754

posted 24 February 2007 09:24 AM      Profile for oreobw     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I like historical stuff and just finished a book called "Cresent and Cross - The Battle of Lepanto 1571" by H Bicheno. It covers the events and social conditions leading up to the actual battle.

The conflicts and extreme intolerance in Europe, driven by religion, are a key part of the setting.

Deciding I didn't know much about the 1500s in Europe, I followed this book by "Spanish Rome 1500-1700". It covers the relationship between what was probably the high point of the Spanish empire and it's relationship to the Papal State.

A comment on Christian fundies, the present day guys are really nice compared to the guys in the 1500s.


From: Toronto | Registered: Jan 2007  |  IP: Logged
JayPotts
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posted 14 March 2007 06:03 PM      Profile for JayPotts   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Currently I am reading Viktor E. Frankl's Man's Search For Meaning. It's a very eye opening book and the so many quotes from this book that are relevant to everyday life.....bottom line I like the book. READ IT people.
From: Toronto | Registered: Feb 2007  |  IP: Logged
bohajal
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posted 16 March 2007 03:36 AM      Profile for bohajal   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
I am reading "A History of God", by Karen Armstrong. About how the three monotheistic religions altered the conception of God and how they refashioned "The one God" to suit the social and political needs of their followers.

I am only a few pages into the 460 pages book.


From: planet earth, I believe | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
N.Beltov
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posted 16 March 2007 03:50 AM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I'm reading A History of Capitalism: a longer view, by Ellen M. Wood. This is a longer (Verso) version of her book published by Monthly Review Press. Wood is a former editor of Monthly Review (preceding John Bellamy Foster), a Canadian, and an interesting writer. She wrote a fine book about social class which is also on my reading list.
From: Vancouver Island | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
Lumpyprole
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posted 16 March 2007 08:08 AM      Profile for Lumpyprole     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
First Post - I am in!

I am reading The Metaphysical Club by Louis Menand (2001).
For modern history buffs, it is pretty gripping stuff. It explains the enormous contributions made to the American psyche by four key American thinkers: Oliver Wendell Holmes, William James, Charles Sanders Pierce (all part of a short-lived Cambridge MA - based informal discussion group for uber eggheads)and John Dewey. The threads that wove them together - the civil war, reactions to and interpretations of Darwinism, race, labour the rights of women for example, are made fresh and relevant by the writer.

[ 16 March 2007: Message edited by: Lumpyprole ]


From: Toronto | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged
N.Beltov
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posted 16 March 2007 10:37 AM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Lumpyprole: First Post - I am in!

Ha ha. Another victim. You'll live to regret it. However, before we give you the keys to the virtual bar ... a skill-testing question:

What young Russian formalist wrote Art as Device in 1917? Was it...

(a) Eugene Zamyatin;
(b) Ivan Bunin;
(c) Georgi Plekhanov, or
(d) Anna Akmatova ?

The correct answer is (e) Viktor Shklovsky. ahahahaha! Seriously, welcome lumpy.


From: Vancouver Island | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
Lumpyprole
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posted 16 March 2007 11:22 AM      Profile for Lumpyprole     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Wow N.Beltov, thanks for the intense hazing.
I almost answered, without reading carefully, that the answer was Pyotr Pavlenko. His short story “Arm as Device”, written about his co-scenarist Sergei Eisenstein’s infamous arm-wrestling contest with an old and ailing Prince Kropotkin.

You will recall, I’m sure, that the original insult that precipitated the “Rostov Rassle” was about whether Eisenstein was hairier than Kropotkin was bald. Or perhaps not, I wasn't there.

[ 16 March 2007: Message edited by: Lumpyprole ]


From: Toronto | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged
SavageInTheCity
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posted 16 March 2007 06:24 PM      Profile for SavageInTheCity     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
David Baldacci - The Winner - A great read
I just finished Night Fall by Nelson Demille - an interesting book, with a lot of twists.

From: INAC's Showcase | Registered: Jan 2006  |  IP: Logged
kingblake
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posted 16 March 2007 11:23 PM      Profile for kingblake     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
My dad's been trying to convince me to read Thomas Pynchon's Gravity's Rainbow for years,
so I finally picked it up a couple of weeks ago. What a fucked up book. After some chapters, I come close to putting it down for good. After others, I'm convinced it's the greatest novel of the 20th century.

I read that the Pulitzer Prize committee was split down the middle about it, half voting
to award it the prize, the other half steadfastedly refusing on the grounds that it was un-readable. So no Pulitzer was awarded that year.

I also just finished reading Blindness and Seeing, both by Jose Saramago. Unforgettable,
I can't recommend either enough.


From: In Regina, the land of Exotica | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
N.Beltov
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posted 16 March 2007 11:34 PM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
kingblake: I also just finished reading Blindness and Seeing, both by Jose Saramago. Unforgettable,
I can't recommend either enough.

Saramago's Balthasar and Bluminda is a great read as well. It's a love story set against the backdrop of the Inquisition and a (fictional) pre-Montgolfier brothers balloon adventure. Balthasar and Bluminda find some interesting uses for a balloon.


From: Vancouver Island | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
mayakovsky
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posted 17 March 2007 05:00 PM      Profile for mayakovsky     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I have just finished 'Lost or Found' by Fimo Mitchell and I am reading 'The Rent Collector' by B. Glen Rotchin. Two powerful first novels by Montrealers. Mitchell's book is about growing up black in Montreal and Rotchin's is about the Jewish community. I will not attempt a synopsis because I don't believe I can convey the importance of these books in a few words. To paraphrase Michael Turner, often the best and most challenging literature comes out of the small presses.
From: New Bedford | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
Farmpunk
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posted 18 March 2007 05:05 AM      Profile for Farmpunk     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I just finished Charles Bukowski's "Women". I've read all his novels. "Post Office" is my favourite. Definitely not for everyone.

But right now I'm into Brad Smith's "Big Man Coming Down The Road." I'm torn on Smith's writing. He has this label of "country noir", and he writes about rural southern Ontario. Still, his books have a genre feel.

I'm going to check out those two books, Mayakovsky. You ever read Danny Laferriere? Haitian Montrealer.

I like small press fiction. It's the difference between Micheal Turner and Russell Smith.


From: SW Ontario | Registered: Jul 2006  |  IP: Logged
jrose
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posted 18 March 2007 01:19 PM      Profile for jrose     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I've just cracked Sidney Poitier's autobiography- and no, not because it's Oprah's pick of the month! Being a massive Katharine Hepburn fan, I fell in love with Sidney Poitier in Guess Who's Coming to Dinner as a child. And I must admit, instead of reading trashy celebrity magazines or reading the latest Shopoholic my guiltiest pleasure is old Hollywood autobiographies and biographies.
From: Ottawa | Registered: Oct 2006  |  IP: Logged
unionist
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posted 18 March 2007 01:39 PM      Profile for unionist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I'm about half done a novel called number9dream, by David Mitchell, a brilliant (IMO) young British writer. I've also read Cloud Atlas and ghostwritten by the same author. Try Cloud Atlas - you've never read anything quite like it - guaranteed.

[ 18 March 2007: Message edited by: unionist ]


From: Vote QS! | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
Phrillie
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posted 25 March 2007 01:43 PM      Profile for Phrillie        Edit/Delete Post
Franzen's "The Corrections." The wittiest novel that I've read in a few years. It's about a family so dysfunctional that it makes ours look almost normal. Franzen writes pieces for the New Yorker and I've always admired him but this is his first novel (that I've read, anyway). Highly recommended.

In other news, I'd recommend a PASS on Messaud's "The Emperor's Children." I think she must have got distracted because some of her story lines wander off and never really come back.

Just my opinion.


From: Salt Spring Island, BC | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged
mayakovsky
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posted 28 March 2007 09:30 PM      Profile for mayakovsky     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I have just read Nick Cohen's 'Whats Left?' A most important book for anyone who is of the 'democratic' left.
From: New Bedford | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
Papal Bull
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posted 29 March 2007 05:38 PM      Profile for Papal Bull   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Would you consider the Nick Cohen book particularly well written? I went into a bookstore and was giving it a look over and wasn't too interested.

I just dove into (and read in the course of a few days) Thomas Homer-Dixon's "The Upside of Down". Absolutely frightening read, despite being fiercly optimistic. It almost reminded me of some of Nietzsche's ideas being forced into reality. Creepy.

As for "The Master and Margarita" it is one of my favourite books. Clearly anyone who thinks otherwise is second-grade fish. On the point of Russian literature (is Bulgakov Russian or Soviet? It is hard to say with him) I picked up an interesting tome called "The Women's Decameron" which chronicles the life of women during the dying days of the Soviet regime in Leningrad. It is emigre literature, but it has been thoroughly enjoyable. For those interested it is by Julia Voznesenskaya, although I think that it is out of print.


From: Vatican's best darned ranch | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
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posted 31 March 2007 04:08 PM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Just finished "The God Delusion" by Richard Dawkins. It interupted my slow re-re- reading of Carl Sagan's "Demon Haunted World" which I have since loaned out to someone.

Currently, I am reading David Suzuki's updated version of "Naked Ape to Superspecies" ( ahem-- a signed copy, no less) and enjoying it.

And during this I also read volume one a very entertaining graphic novel called "Ranma 1/2" by Rumiko Takahashi.


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Papal Bull
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posted 01 April 2007 09:23 AM      Profile for Papal Bull   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Tommy_Paine:
And during this I also read volume one a very entertaining graphic novel called "Ranma 1/2" by Rumiko Takahashi.

Oh, Ranma1/2. That is a pretty entertaining manga. Actually, on the manga front I just re-read "Akira" over the past few months. It is one of those absolutely epic reads that most people should attempt in their lives.

I also received the graphic novel/comic book/whatever else you can call them "The Plot" by Will Eisner from a friend on my birthday and read that. I think I've gone through it a dozen times. Amazing. I'm trying to read all of Eisner's sequential stuff before branching out into his writings.


From: Vatican's best darned ranch | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
mayakovsky
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posted 01 April 2007 02:14 PM      Profile for mayakovsky     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Papal Bull, I found it quite well written. It put many things that I had been thinking into perspective. He takes on some leftist icons like Chomsky and Galloway. Some critics have accussed him of being obsessed with Galloway. And many of his critics are vociferous.One aspect of the criticism I find interesting (because it strikes home) is that he gets accussed of having jumped to the right because he critiques aspects of the left that bother him.
From: New Bedford | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
obscurantist
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posted 01 April 2007 03:03 PM      Profile for obscurantist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Well, it depends what aspects of the left bother him, no? Or whether he plays up minor aspects or plays down significant ones?

There seems to be a trend, partly but perhaps not entirely prompted by 9/11 and the Iraq war, of people who think they've discovered an amazing revelation that other people on the "left" have yet to discover, or can't accept the reality of.

That revelation, discussed on Babble at length with regard to Christopher Hitchens and Michael Ignatieff among others, is that the Islamofascists really want to destroy all that people on the left hold dear, and that we should unite behind George W. Bush and company to crush them. Heck, while we're at it, how can we really say the Iraq war was a bad thing? Who knows how it'll play out in the long term? And besides, in the short term it got rid of an evil dictator.

Tony Blair is perhaps the highest-profile proponent of this view. Another Canadian proponent is BC author Terry Glavin, who is sporadically intelligent when writing about more local topics like First Nations land struggles, but insufferably disingenuous when you get him talking about anything international in scope. I have trouble thinking of any Americans who fit the bill, but then the "left" in the U.S. has until recently been rather docile as it is.

Ignatieff, Hitchens, Glavin, and Blair share a sort of condescending smugness, alternating with a somewhat paranoid defensiveness, that comes with their belief that they have to deliver this news over and over again to their benighted brethen, but that of course entrenched and powerful forces will try to attack them in an effort to cover up their own hypocrisy.

(Then there's also the further subset of folks who will attack any criticism of Israel's policies as "anti-Semitic." However, so many pixels have been spilled here on that topic that I'll just mention it in passing.)

Cohen's book is getting glowing reviews from the likes of Hitchens and Glavin (who's written several gleeful posts on his blog about the strong negative response to the book -- how that response reveals the intellectual and moral bankruptcy of so many leftists, yadda yadda ya).

There's a couple of decent critiques of Cohen's book here and here.

(Edited to add: There was also a bit of discussion about Cohen's book here.)

[ 01 April 2007: Message edited by: obscurantist ]


From: an unweeded garden | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
mayakovsky
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posted 01 April 2007 03:38 PM      Profile for mayakovsky     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I don't believe I have posted about this and I have lost the link. But its a book of poetry from Guantanamo inmates that is slated for release in August, the details are below.


'Inside the wire'
The pressures of confinement in Guantánamo Bay have led many in the
controversial detention camp to turn to poetry. But, as Richard Lea
learns, the American authorities are very reluctant to let the world see them
Monday February 26 2007
The Guardian


Poetry's capacity to rattle governments is not, it appears, confined to
totalitarian regimes. A collection of poems by detainees at the US
military base in Guantánamo Bay is to be published later this year, but
only in the face of strong opposition by suspicious American censors.

Twenty-one poems written "inside the wire" in Arabic, Pashto and
English have been gathered together despite formidable obstacles by Marc
Falkoff, a law professor at Northern Illinois University who represents 17
of the detainees at the camp. The collection, entitled Poems from
Guantánamo: The Detainees Speak, will be published in August by the
University of Iowa Press with an afterword written by Ariel Dorfman


From: New Bedford | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
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posted 07 April 2007 04:52 AM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I have interupted my reading of "Naked Ape to Superspecies" to lose myself in a work of fiction called "Wolf of the Plains" by Conn Iggulden.

It's been a while since I have read some entertaining fiction. If one likes good story telling and historical fiction, this is a good book for you.

It's about the life and times of Temijun, aka Gengis Khan, of no fixed address.


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Farmpunk
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posted 07 April 2007 06:57 AM      Profile for Farmpunk     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Just finished Root Bound by Grant Buday. Fiction, about an older man growing and dealing pot in BC. Decent read.

I also just blasted through Conan The Valorous, which I picked up from the discard pile at a library. Surprisingly, a fun read.

I'll be adding the Gengis book to my list, T-P. I'm a sucker for well written historical fiction. I seem to be alone in loving Collen McCullogh's Roman series. The First Man In Rome and The Grass Crown are incredible books.

[ 07 April 2007: Message edited by: Farmpunk ]


From: SW Ontario | Registered: Jul 2006  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
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posted 07 April 2007 07:04 AM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I quite enjoyed those books also. In fact, the HBO "Rome" series, while very good, regretfully chose not to start with Gaius Marius and Cornelius Sulla. I think the generation before Julius Ceasar had more drama.

You should try some of Bernard Cornwell's books if you like historical fiction and just plain good old fashioned story telling. It isn't literature, but it's a lot of fun.


And of course, there's always Macdonald Fraser's "Flashman" series.

Ripping yarns.


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Farmpunk
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posted 07 April 2007 07:13 AM      Profile for Farmpunk     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I think McCullogh states at one point that she enjoyed writing The First Man In Rome and The Grass Crown more than the Ceasar centric books because she had more leeway to form the characters of the time, especially Sulla and Marius. The time of Ceaser is more documented so she was less able to play with the story.

I've honestly not met anyone who's read those books, T-P. And I can't seem to get any of my reading friends to read them. They're a little intimidating.


From: SW Ontario | Registered: Jul 2006  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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posted 08 April 2007 07:57 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Today I'll be reading a ton of course material for my two courses so I can do two essays in the next two days!
From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
mary123
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posted 08 April 2007 10:29 PM      Profile for mary123     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
This week I'm off to purchase Chris Hedges "American Fascists: The Christian Right and the War on America."

I heard him on the radio and am eager to read his latest release.


From: ~~Canada - still God's greatest creation on the face of the earth~~ | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
Papal Bull
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posted 09 April 2007 11:25 AM      Profile for Papal Bull   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
since I'm a loser I found all three books in the Mars trilogoy in a library discard pile. I've read through Red Mars in about a week. It is pretty okay, not the best written...but fun.
From: Vatican's best darned ranch | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Farmpunk
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posted 12 April 2007 08:36 AM      Profile for Farmpunk     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
"The Unsettling Of America", Wendell Berry.

A bit heavy for my tastes, but highly recommended for those who don't think that agriculture and rural life is important, or has resonance for our modern urban world.


From: SW Ontario | Registered: Jul 2006  |  IP: Logged
Papal Bull
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posted 13 April 2007 01:32 PM      Profile for Papal Bull   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I was perusing around the UoT bookstore because it is a sale. I found a really cool bok called "The Women's Liberation Movement in Russia from 1860-1930". I also went to the Toronto Women's Bookstore with a friend (she had never been) and found Medieval Women: A Social History of Women in England 450-1500 by Henrietta Leyser, which looks interesting.
From: Vatican's best darned ranch | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
obscurantist
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posted 23 April 2007 11:11 PM      Profile for obscurantist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Halfway through Michael Connelly's The Lincoln Lawyer, a mystery / thriller written from the perspective of a not particularly scrupulous but not entirely unprincipled L.A. criminal defence attorney. Maybe a bit like recasting Philip Marlowe as a lawyer in the present day.

The novel slows down to go off on tangents as the narrator rambles on about his various clients, the workings of the misnamed justice system, and other things peripheral to the central plot, but the tangents don't seem too out of place.

Now I'm curious to read one of Connelly's books from his series about police detective Hieronymous (Harry) Bosch.


From: an unweeded garden | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
M.Gregus
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posted 24 April 2007 03:00 PM      Profile for M.Gregus     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I've just picked up Timothy Taylor's Stanley Park and look forward to the well-publicized food descriptions, courtesy of "Canada Reads."
From: capital region | Registered: Oct 2006  |  IP: Logged
jrose
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posted 25 April 2007 08:21 AM      Profile for jrose     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I'm just getting into chapter two of A Complicated Kindness by Miriam Toews.
From: Ottawa | Registered: Oct 2006  |  IP: Logged
Farmpunk
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posted 25 April 2007 08:45 AM      Profile for Farmpunk     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Just finished a Tommy-Paine recommendation: Wolf Of The Plains. A good, fast, fun read.

I'll be curious to hear what you think of Stanley Park, M Gregus. I think I'll get my library to order me in a copy of this year's Canada Reads winner, Lulabies For Little Criminals. Stanley Park sounded good, too.


From: SW Ontario | Registered: Jul 2006  |  IP: Logged
M.Gregus
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posted 25 April 2007 05:59 PM      Profile for M.Gregus     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Farmpunk:
I'll be curious to hear what you think of Stanley Park, M Gregus. I think I'll get my library to order me in a copy of this year's Canada Reads winner, Lulabies For Little Criminals. Stanley Park sounded good, too.

It came down to a choice between the same titles for me. I ordered both from the library and as luck would have it, Stanley Park came first. Well, that, and a much longer waiting list for Lullabies For Little Criminals. Will report back on Stanley Park.


From: capital region | Registered: Oct 2006  |  IP: Logged
Life, the universe, everything
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posted 25 April 2007 06:23 PM      Profile for Life, the universe, everything     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I'm reading both Pandemonium by Andrew Nikiforuk and The End of Food by Thomas F. Pawlick.

When one depresses me I turn to the other until it depresses me. Strangely I haven't been very hungry lately!


From: a little to the left - a bit more-there perfect | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged
Farmpunk
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posted 26 April 2007 02:35 AM      Profile for Farmpunk     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Read 'Pastured Poultry Profits', Joel Salatin, and you'll likely feel better. The key to good ag writing is simplicity of message: farmers can grow good food, people need and want good food. Anything that gets in the way is a fuckup.

I'll look into those books, Life.


From: SW Ontario | Registered: Jul 2006  |  IP: Logged
Geneva
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posted 26 April 2007 05:33 AM      Profile for Geneva     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Belle du Seigneur, by Albert Cohen:
http://tinyurl.com/3b5yox

reading it in French, but narrative remarkably similar in English, I am assured

From Publishers Weekly
A vast, astonishing satire of modern life, Cohen's continuously digressive comic novel, set in Geneva in the 1930s, skewers, above all else, the emptiness of middle-class existence, its worship of power and money. Its antihero is Solal, Under-Secretary of the League of Nations, who risks his reputation over an obsessive love affair with the rebellious, bored wife of a pompous League official. Like Cohen himself, Solal is a Mediterranean Jew, an outsider. He mocks his own deep religious faith and expresses skepticism about the League's idealistic internationalism?which he nevertheless makes his personal mission. Tracing Solal's path, Cohen swings from slang to grandiloquence and pure stream-of-consciousness, mixing low farce, high comedy, rapturous erotica and acid satire on the rise of fascism. His gleefully observed gallery of fools exposes a catalogue of human failings?pretense, envy, snobbery, machismo, conformity?all typified by the man Solal cuckolds, Adrien Deume, a hypocritical, bigoted bureaucrat whose narrow-mindedness contrasts with the League's grand ambitions.

[ 26 April 2007: Message edited by: Geneva ]


From: um, well | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Sven
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posted 26 April 2007 05:44 AM      Profile for Sven     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
"god is not Great", by Christopher Hitchens. It is a wonderful examination of the destructive role religion plays in our world.
From: Eleutherophobics of the World...Unite!!!!! | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
unionist
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posted 26 April 2007 05:52 AM      Profile for unionist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Sven:
"god is not Great", by Christopher Hitchens. It is a wonderful examination of the destructive role religion plays in our world.

I'm not sure how the words "wonderful" and "Christopher Hitchens" can fit in the same paragraph (whoops, there, I've done it too!). But maybe if he is not actually saying a single word about politics, you might be right. I'll try not to condemn his book sight unseen! That would be an "ad authorem" argument.


From: Vote QS! | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
Geneva
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posted 26 April 2007 07:03 AM      Profile for Geneva     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I dunno how you are reading Hitchens; here is the note in Amazon:
Availability: Not yet published: you may still order this title. We will dispatch it to you when we receive it from the publisher.

ooops, sorry, that is amazon.co.uk;
book is fully available May 1st on stores in USA

[ 26 April 2007: Message edited by: Geneva ]


From: um, well | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Sven
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posted 26 April 2007 07:04 AM      Profile for Sven     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by unionist:

I'm not sure how the words "wonderful" and "Christopher Hitchens" can fit in the same paragraph (whoops, there, I've done it too!). But maybe if he is not actually saying a single word about politics, you might be right. I'll try not to condemn his book sight unseen! That would be an "ad authorem" argument.


Yeah, I know a lot of progressives are unhappy with Hitchens’ stance on the “war on terror” but he remains a very provocative and shrewd observer on a wide range of other issues.


From: Eleutherophobics of the World...Unite!!!!! | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Sven
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posted 26 April 2007 07:07 AM      Profile for Sven     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Geneva:
I dunno how you are reading Hitchens; here is the note in Amazon:
Availability: Not yet published: you may still order this title. We will dispatch it to you when we receive it from the publisher.

I preordered the book on January 22 through Amazon (the expected shipping date at that time was early June), but I just received my copy last weekend (along with "End of Faith" by Sam Harris).

ETA: I can take photos of it to prove it!!

[ 26 April 2007: Message edited by: Sven ]


From: Eleutherophobics of the World...Unite!!!!! | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Farmpunk
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posted 26 April 2007 08:30 AM      Profile for Farmpunk     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I liked 'Missionary Position'.
From: SW Ontario | Registered: Jul 2006  |  IP: Logged
bigcitygal
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posted 26 April 2007 09:23 AM      Profile for bigcitygal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I prefer "Women on Top".
From: It's difficult to work in a group when you're omnipotent - Q | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
M.Gregus
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posted 26 April 2007 10:55 AM      Profile for M.Gregus     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by bigcitygal:
I prefer "Women on Top".


From: capital region | Registered: Oct 2006  |  IP: Logged
Farmpunk
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posted 27 April 2007 06:53 AM      Profile for Farmpunk     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Who doesn't? Likely not Hitchens, or Ma Theresa.
From: SW Ontario | Registered: Jul 2006  |  IP: Logged
remind
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posted 27 April 2007 08:03 AM      Profile for remind     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by mary123:
This week I'm off to purchase Chris Hedges "American Fascists: The Christian Right and the War on America."

I heard him on the radio and am eager to read his latest release.


Was just going through the thread to see if anyone else had yet picked up this book. I am midway through it, though have had it for 2 weeks. And not because it is a poor read--it isn't--it should be a must read, but because it illuminates, all too clearly, the truths of UR Fascism rising in our society.

So, when reading, I end up, going off on a mental tangent, ferreting out all the examples that indicate this drift towards fascist ideology in Canada. It is amazing, how some seem to be so unconcerned about it. Or at least they are not realizing what they are buying into. Then I end up formulating verbal actions of what to say/do when people, and there are more everyday, exhibit the first blush of fascism. By the time I get back to the book, it is time to put it down and work/sleep.

However, for me, even when the book is put down, it is hard to keeps one's mind from thinking about what he says and the implications. And at first I thought, "we have time to stop the nonsense growing in Canada."

Then was watching The Daily Show last evening and watched Jon's segment on Regent University and how 150 graduates work in the Bush administration. And my mind went to Harper's stacking the judicial committees with the Evangelical crowd, that Hedges reveals so much about, and I have to change my thoughts to; "we MIGHT have time to change this in Canada."


From: "watching the tide roll away" | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
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posted 27 April 2007 01:42 PM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I've been tempted to purchase the Hitchen's biography of Thomas Jefferson, but I was kinda holding out for an author on the subject who is more academic and less controversial.

Am I wrong in that? Am I selling Hitchen's research abilities short?


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
clandestiny
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posted 28 April 2007 06:04 PM      Profile for clandestiny     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Hitchens seems to be dishonest, re the Iraq war. I can't imagine he (and martin amis too) really believe the 'threat assessment' promoted by foxnews etc, when the west's military budget dwarfs even China's. What's wrong with simply tightening up international law? Btw, i recall reading that hitchens and amis, when kids, got to visit Robert Graves in Ibiza(?)...and here these little bastards are singing bush the neocon's praises! What a fricking waste, eh?
here's a Graves poem (from memory)...
-----
The Miller's Man
The imperturbable miller's man
whose help the boy implored, drowning,
drifting slowly past the mill,
was a stout swimmer,
yet would not come between
the River god,
and his assured victim...

Soon, he, too, swimming in the sun,
is caught with cramp,
And as the boy's ghost
jeers from the reeds and rushes;
he drowns valiantly in silence,
this being no one's business
but his own...

Let us not reckon the miller's man
with Judas or with Jesus,
but with the cattle,
who endure all weathers,
or with the millwheel,
foolishly creaking,
incurious of the grains in the bin...


From: the canada's | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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posted 05 May 2007 03:35 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Just got finished re-reading some books from Madeleine L'Engle's "Wrinkle" series: A Wrinkle in Time, A Wind in the Door, Many Waters, A Swiftly Tilting Planet, and An Acceptable time.

I've always loved these books. L'Engle's books are somewhat religious, but she's something of an apostate, too, at least from a fundamentalist outlook. She very much mixes the scientific with the mystic and it's very interesting.

P.S. This is hilarious! Those of us who are parents know about the ton of children's books out there about mom and dad bringing home a new baby and the older sibling coping. Well, this book is about a DOG coping with a new baby in the house, written from the dog's perspective! Hee hee!

[ 05 May 2007: Message edited by: Michelle ]


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Croghan27
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posted 05 May 2007 04:23 AM      Profile for Croghan27     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Does this count?

I tried to print off an article from the Canadian Defense & Foreign Affairs Institute and ended up with 18 page of rather small print.

There are many commentators that I do not agree with, some I do, and some that seem to me to introduce new ideas using verifiable sources and good judgements.

The Brian Flemming in the link above has a particularly good concept. He questions the 'Metrics of victory in Afghanisan'. All in all, if we win, lose of get rained out how will we know.

There is also a good article on the Artic. If we build new ice breakers, who is to get them - the navy or the Coast Guard. It has been better than half a century since the navy had ice breaking capability, but they seem to be the instrument to assert our authority in the north. The author points out that we are in a worse condition than Russia, as global warming will be delayed for georgraphic reasons in our section above the Arctic Circle.

This is byRob Huebert The Battle for the Control of Canadian Arctic Waters: Icebreakers or Patrol Vessels?

[ 05 May 2007: Message edited by: Croghan27 ]


From: Ottawa | Registered: Jun 2006  |  IP: Logged
Farmpunk
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posted 05 May 2007 08:52 AM      Profile for Farmpunk     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
A friend lent me Cormac McCarthy's "The Road". Not sure I'm going to be able to finish it. Anyone out there read this book?
From: SW Ontario | Registered: Jul 2006  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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posted 13 May 2007 08:06 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I am reading a book that I bought about five years ago and never got around to reading. It's because it was one of a bunch of books I picked up at a charity used book sale, and most of them have sat on my shelf, waiting for me to get around to reading them. Mostly the books were Canadiana that I figured I'd never find so cheap again.

Anyhow, this book is called, "They Shouldn't Make You Promise That," by Lois Simmie. It's a fantastic book so far - I'm almost half-way through it. It's really funny, but also rage-inducing. A housewife's reaction to her life which is a mix of boredom and resentment because her husband is a total chauvanist ass. I'm going between being filled with rage and laughing my ass off at the hilarious, snarky way the main character is describing her life and her interchanges with her husband and kids.

Here's the blurb on the back cover:

quote:
"What more do you want?"

As far as Eleanor's mother was concerned, Eleanor should ahve been content with what she had - a handsome, hardworking husband, three fine children, a lovely home.

As far as Eleanor's husband was concerned, what she needed was a psychiatrist.

As far as Eleanor's psychiatrist was concerned, she had to put romance back into her marriage.

But as far as Eleanor was concerned, there had to be more, and taking a lover was just the first step.


I'm looking forward to getting to the "taking a lover" part! I'm so pissed off at her husband right now!


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 13 May 2007 10:28 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I'm reading a thick bio of Leonard Cohen published in 1993. Can't remember the title, and the book is upstairs.
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Flash Walken
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posted 13 May 2007 11:04 AM      Profile for Flash Walken     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Currently reading 'Durruti in the Spanish Revolution' and 'Horizontalism: Voices of Popular Power in Argentina'.

[ 13 May 2007: Message edited by: Flash Walken ]


From: Vancouver | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
jrose
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posted 14 May 2007 06:37 AM      Profile for jrose     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I just finished up A Complicated Kindness by Miriam Toews, and now I’ve just opened Sidney Poitier’s “A Measure of a Man,” and NO, not because it was Oprah’s pick last month!
From: Ottawa | Registered: Oct 2006  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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Babbler # 560

posted 18 May 2007 02:34 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Okay, so that book I mentioned a few posts ago? I finished it the same day (it's a short book) and it was very good. An especially good read if you're a woman in the midst of separation or divorce issues. I should've read it years ago!
From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
JayPotts
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posted 03 June 2007 05:33 PM      Profile for JayPotts   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Right now I am reading 6 Rainer Drive by Debbie Macomber. It's from the Cedar Cove series I am a sucker drama/relationship fiction.
From: Toronto | Registered: Feb 2007  |  IP: Logged
zak4amnesty
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posted 04 June 2007 08:39 AM      Profile for zak4amnesty   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Read Ghost Plane.
Just do it.
At least leaf through it.
That will disturb you enough.

From: Chemical Valley | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged
Gir Draxon
leftist-rightie and rightist-leftie
Babbler # 3804

posted 05 June 2007 08:52 PM      Profile for Gir Draxon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Just started Autobiography of a Face by Lucy Grealy.
From: Arkham Asylum | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
zak4amnesty
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posted 06 June 2007 09:30 AM      Profile for zak4amnesty   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
The Noonday Demon

by Andrew Soloman

An Atlas of Depression.

Soloman has depression, and is not a DR. Very easy to read and understand. I have Bi-Polar, and it helps me to understand, and my mother, who has only recently accepted my disorder, is finally using this book to learn about the joy of all sorts of depression.


From: Chemical Valley | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged
Left Turn
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Babbler # 8662

posted 06 June 2007 12:53 PM      Profile for Left Turn     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
JPod by Douglas Coupland.

The book is about a group of computer programmers who work at a Burnaby based game design company, and have been assigned to a group of cublicles known as JPod, based on having last names that begin with the letter J. The main character is Ethan Jarlewski. The other members of JPod are Bree, Mark, John Doe, and Kaitlin. Ethan gets wrapped up in a whole bunch of craziness over the course of the novel. It's hillariously funny. The story is of the variety one might expect of programs on the Showcase network. That's all I'm going to say about it, least I give away too much for those who want to read it.

[ 06 June 2007: Message edited by: Left Turn ]


From: Burnaby, BC | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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Babbler # 560

posted 07 June 2007 02:51 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
babble. All my books are packed!
From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Gir Draxon
leftist-rightie and rightist-leftie
Babbler # 3804

posted 08 June 2007 12:54 AM      Profile for Gir Draxon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I'm also into Classical Rhetoric for the Modern Student right now.


(Yeah, my reading this summer is dictated by a syllabus)


From: Arkham Asylum | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Stargazer
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posted 08 June 2007 03:52 AM      Profile for Stargazer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Currently reading Daviud Sedaris' Hilarious Book Barrel Fever. He is funny and full of social satire (and sarcasm).

Also reading at the same time The Bush Agenda

Thanks Rundler for the graphic novel links above. They look amazing. I love graphic novels. I have the page bookmarked and will get a few of them next week. I've alreay re-read my Hate series three times.


From: Inside every cynical person, there is a disappointed idealist. | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
clersal
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Babbler # 370

posted 08 June 2007 09:11 AM      Profile for clersal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Just finished, 'The Devil's Feather' by Minette Walters.
Excellent. Very well written.

From: Canton Marchand, Québec | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Farmpunk
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 12955

posted 09 June 2007 02:10 AM      Profile for Farmpunk     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I've taken to reading babble suggested books.

I've read Iggulden's "Wolf of the Plains". Good, fun, fast, ending was little compressed but nothing poorly executed. I also read another T-Paine suggestion, "Flashman", and strangely enough, though written many years ago and about another time period, it's about Afganistan and is very relevant. Also very funny.

I'm just about done "Man Without A Country", Vonnegut. And I just finished Stephanie Domet's "Homing", which was a very good read, and one for the CanLit-indie press supporters out there.

Oh, and I just started "The Rent Collector", a mayakovsky suggestion.


From: SW Ontario | Registered: Jul 2006  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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Babbler # 560

posted 09 June 2007 04:03 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Oh, whoops. This is over a hundred posts. I'll post my comments in this new thread.

[ 09 June 2007: Message edited by: Michelle ]


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged

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