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Author Topic: Kid lit for the politically sensitive – but not too sensitive
Rundler
editor
Babbler # 2699

posted 15 December 2005 10:35 AM      Profile for Rundler     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Babble's own Michelle, Nodcaster and reader of children's stories, recommends a few books that will delight young readers without rankling you http://www.rabble.ca/reviews

Add your favourites here too!

[ 15 December 2005: Message edited by: Rundler ]


From: the murky world of books books books | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged
LemonThriller
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Babbler # 11085

posted 15 December 2005 02:25 PM      Profile for LemonThriller     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Children's books seem to be getting better and better every year. I think I need to start re-living my youth (there's nothing wrong with reading children's books, is there?)

I remember the most progressive things I used to read as a kid were books from Astrid Lindren (A Swedish author most famous for her books on Pippi Longstocking.) My dad is Swedish, and being the most popular books in Sweden at the time, he would read them to me.

I remember once a friend of mine asking me if I had ever read a children's story with a female protagonist in the hero's role, and I found the question odd because Astrid's books primarily put girls as the lead heros. So I answered 'yes, of course!' I think progressive books for children has been a long time coming in North America.

A couple of years ago I remember a friend of mine had a book with all the traditional fairy tales, re-written to be politically correct. It was hilarious -- I forget the name of it though.


From: Halifax, N.S. | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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Babbler # 560

posted 15 December 2005 03:37 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hey LemonThriller - I think that was "Politically Correct Bedtime Stories" by James Finn Garner. I have both the first and second ones he put out. And yeah, I think they're really funny too.

I've been tempted to read one of them on Nodcast, but they're really for grown-ups, not kids. And besides, it's copyrighted material, so oh well.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Rundler
editor
Babbler # 2699

posted 19 December 2005 11:50 AM      Profile for Rundler     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Anyone have any great kids books to recommend?
From: the murky world of books books books | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged
Lard Tunderin' Jeezus
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Babbler # 1275

posted 19 December 2005 12:24 PM      Profile for Lard Tunderin' Jeezus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Rundler - How old and which gender?

Gender isn't necessarily a factor, but can be for the particularly girly or boyish.


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Rundler
editor
Babbler # 2699

posted 21 December 2005 02:47 PM      Profile for Rundler     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Good question. Well, I'd be interested in hearing any favourites for anyone. But to be totally selfish -- I'm looking for something good to give an 11-year-old boy who isn't particularly a reader. I'm trying to think of something that would be so enchanting for him that he'll want to read.
From: the murky world of books books books | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged
Diane Demorney
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Babbler # 6183

posted 21 December 2005 03:00 PM      Profile for Diane Demorney   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Quick! I need to find a book for a young teen girl (13) that is pro-feminist, pro-active kinda thing. For my niece. For Christmas. Yes, I've waited too late.
From: Calgary | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
andrean
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 361

posted 21 December 2005 03:12 PM      Profile for andrean     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I bought Deal With It: A Whole New Approach to Your Body, Brain and Life as a Gurl for my teenage stepsister some years ago. It's kind of "Our Bodies, Ourselves" Junior.
From: etobicoke-lakeshore | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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Babbler # 560

posted 21 December 2005 04:19 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Canadian Socialist:
Quick! I need to find a book for a young teen girl (13) that is pro-feminist, pro-active kinda thing. For my niece. For Christmas. Yes, I've waited too late.

The last book in my review (link at top of thread) would be perfect for her! "A Group of One" by Rachna Gilmore. I'd have loved it at that age. Heck, I loved it at 33.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Walker
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7819

posted 21 December 2005 05:53 PM      Profile for Walker     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Canadian Socialist:
Quick! I need to find a book for a young teen girl (13) that is pro-feminist, pro-active kinda thing. For my niece. For Christmas. Yes, I've waited too late.

I'm not sure if you'll be able to find it, but "Tomorrow when the war began' by John Marsden is a classic teen novel. It's the first in a 6 book series.
This quote from a teen on Amazon.com says it better than me:

Australian teenager Ellie and six of her friends return from a winter break camping trip to find their homes burned or deserted, their families imprisoned, and their country occupied by a foreign military force in league with a band of disaffected Australians. As their shock wears off, the seven decide they must stick together if they are to survive. After a life-threatening skirmish with the occupiers, the teens retreat to their isolated campsite in the bush country and make plans to fight a guerilla war against the invaders. Writing in a distinct voice and showing rare intelligence and sensitivity, Ellie recounts their courageous battles against the Goliath in control of their land. She also records her feelings and observations about the romantic partnerships that develop within her small circle of friends, and shows how they mature and blossom during this time of crisis. Though readers are left wondering whether these heroes and heroines will survive (one is severely wounded at the end of the novel), Ellie's uncommonly honest and clear narration makes this coming-of-age adventure a story they won't forget. Fast-paced and provocative, it's a natural for book talking.?Jack Forman, Mesa College Library, San Diego

Don't worry, it's not a pro-war novel, and it's not condescending to teens either. John Marsden has won many awards around the world for all his books, not just this, and the only reasons you may not have heard of him is either because he's Australian or he writes for young people.

BTW, I'm reading it right now, and it's fantastic (amd I'm a 41 year old male)!

Have a look at it here


From: Not Canada | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
brebis noire
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Babbler # 7136

posted 21 December 2005 06:30 PM      Profile for brebis noire     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Canadian Socialist:
Quick! I need to find a book for a young teen girl (13) that is pro-feminist, pro-active kinda thing. For my niece. For Christmas. Yes, I've waited too late.

You could try Parvana's Journey


From: Quebec | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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Babbler # 560

posted 21 December 2005 09:07 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hey, that would have been my son's name if he'd been a girl. Parvaneh. (Or Parvana. Same name, different transliterations.) It means "butterfly" in Persian.

[ 21 December 2005: Message edited by: Michelle ]


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Accidental Altruist
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Babbler # 11219

posted 21 December 2005 10:05 PM      Profile for Accidental Altruist   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I haven't read it yet but have heard "Persepolis : The Story of a Childhood" could fit the bill.

My 11 year old is quite interested in the "Dear Canada" historical novel series. I bought a copy of "Rebecca's World" for her last Christmas, had to order it from the UK... big hassle. I was all excited because the book was a fave of mine. It's a year on and I don't think she's even cracked the spine.

For younger folk I recommend "Cinder Edna". I bought 4 copies to give out as gifts.


From: i'm directly under the sun ... ... right .. . . . ... now! | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
Melsky
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Babbler # 4748

posted 21 December 2005 10:57 PM      Profile for Melsky   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm reading the Dear Canada series right now. I'm 36! I read one a night before bed. I'm originally from the US so it's a fun way to learn little bits of Canadian history that I haven't been exposed to yet. Whenever I check them out of the library I secretly hope the librarians think I am getting them for my kids.

They do make me glad of the fact that I came to Canada in a Subaru instead of a leaky ship full of rats and typhoid.


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dtowns
recent-rabble-rouser
Babbler # 11588

posted 05 January 2006 04:27 PM      Profile for dtowns     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Canadian Socialist:
Quick! I need to find a book for a young teen girl (13) that is pro-feminist, pro-active kinda thing. For my niece. For Christmas. Yes, I've waited too late.

I know its already too late, but FYI, Judy Blume's first children's novel entitled IGGIE'S HOUSE, is a perfect match for what you are looking for. It chronicles Izzie's (a young feminist-like character) first summer apart from her best friend (who moved away) in the 1950's. A black family moves into her friend's house, and the neighbourhood reacts with cruel intolerance. Izzie really likes this new family and tries to teach her neighbours the importance of equality.


From: St.Kitts | Registered: Jan 2006  |  IP: Logged

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