babble home
rabble.ca - news for the rest of us
today's active topics


Post New Topic  Post A Reply
FAQ | Forum Home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» babble   » rabble content   » babble book lounge   » Cookery/foodie books - rabble recs

Email this thread to someone!    
Author Topic: Cookery/foodie books - rabble recs
lagatta
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2534

posted 08 December 2005 03:47 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm not remotely interested in science fiction but that thread gave me a good foodie thread idea!
From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
obscurantist
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 8238

posted 08 December 2005 04:00 PM      Profile for obscurantist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well, for a while I've been thinking about an idea from Timothy Taylor's book Stanley Park. The book is about a chef who starts his own restaurant in Vancouver, teetering on the edge of a financial meltdown as he tries to stick to his particular philosophy about cooking.

Taylor suggests that there are two schools of thought in the restaurant industry, which he calls the Bloods and the Crips (after the L.A. street gangs of the same names). The Bloods are all about authentic regional cuisine, with traditional ingredients and hearty portions. The Crips, by contrast, are postmodern -- fusion cuisine, food as art, like those elegant little skyscrapers containing a tiny amount of food surrounded by carefully positioned garnishes of something-or-another.

Taylor makes no secret of his preferences for the "Bloods" style of cooking. But I was wondering, did he make this idea up? Taylor isn't a chef himself, and did a lot of research for the book, but I haven't come across these terms applied to cooking anywhere else.

It's an okay novel -- the story felt a bit forced to me, and could have worked just as well without as much melodrama and so many subplots -- but it was the behind-the-scenes view of the restaurant industry that kept me reading.

[ 08 December 2005: Message edited by: obscurantist ]


From: an unweeded garden | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Mr. Magoo
guilty-pleasure
Babbler # 3469

posted 08 December 2005 04:01 PM      Profile for Mr. Magoo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
This book, Chinese Cooking, by Ken Hom, is the Xmas gift that got me cooking Asian. It's my go-to book. It's influenced me more, and taught me more, than any other cookbook I own.

Another favourite: Introduction to Indian Cooking, by Madhur Jaffrey. Mine's the paperback, but last time I was in Indigo, I saw an updated version with (gasp!) pictures.


From: ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø, | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
sarabble
recent-rabble-rouser
Babbler # 10937

posted 08 December 2005 04:19 PM      Profile for sarabble     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Simply Thai Cooking by Wandee Young and Byron Ayanoglu is my favourite sidekick in the kitchen. The recipes are easy, quick, healthy, and really tasty if you like Thai flavours. Yummm!
From: The Capital | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged
Nikita
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 9050

posted 08 December 2005 04:29 PM      Profile for Nikita     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
My personal favourite cookbook is the one me and my mum made when I was little. We wrote out recipes onto cards and made a pink felt cover and bound it all together with pipecleaners and decorated with the perfunctory glitter and bows. I still have it. Unfortunately it's not slated for mass production just yet.

I don't use cookbooks very much, instead I like getting recipes from foodnetwork.com mostly because I watch the shows and then get the recipes.


From: Regina | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
rinne
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 9117

posted 08 December 2005 05:20 PM      Profile for rinne     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Joy of Cooking, purchased at seventeen and read cover to cover, is very special to me. It gave me the information and confidence to try, what was for me, new recipes such as Sauerbrauten and Baba Cakes. I rarely use it anymore except as a reference and when I do use it for baking I always cut the sugar by at least a quarter.

"Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone" by Deborah Madison is one of my favourites and I would agree with Mr. Magoo that for Indian cooking Madhur Jaffrey is great.

[ 08 December 2005: Message edited by: a citizen of winnipeg ]


From: prairies | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged
kuri
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4202

posted 08 December 2005 05:44 PM      Profile for kuri   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Nikita:
My personal favourite cookbook is the one me and my mum made when I was little.

I have a very similar thing. I still make a lot of the recipes. Some, however, though delicious, seem slated for a different time. Whenever I go to a new city, I takes me forever to find a butcher who give me beef short ribs.

quote:
Originally posted by a citizen of winnipeg:
The Joy of Cooking, purchased at seventeen and read cover to cover, is very special to me.

I'm seconding this one as well. I learned to bake bread with this book.

Finally, I was the recommend a book from my vegetarian years, the The Bean Bible: A Legumaniac's Guide to Lentils, Peas, and Every Edible Bean on the Planet! It goes over every type of bean, cooking times, anti-flatulence tips, and the recipes I've tried were quite delicious. I'd love to find something similar for rice. My mom has book like this for vegetables, You Are What You Eat. It lists every vegetable known to man, it's nutritional contents and a recipe featuring that vegetable. I don't remember who wrote, but I suspect that it's out of print as I was unable to find any google reference to it.

My parents have radically different cooking styles. My mom always followed recipes to the letter and worried a lot about timing everything to come ready at the same time. My dad, as long as he had onions and meat, could always make one of his never-the-same-twice versions of goulash using whatever happened to be in the house. Since I'm much more cut from my Dad's cloth in this regard, I tend to view cookbooks as little more than a rough guide and all my own recipe use "country measures"*.

*"Country Measures" refers to measures such as "a whole mess of ____" or "a tinsy bit of ___". I got that from an old episode of The Beverly Hillbillies.


From: an employer more progressive than rabble.ca | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
Mr. Magoo
guilty-pleasure
Babbler # 3469

posted 08 December 2005 06:13 PM      Profile for Mr. Magoo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
The Joy of Cooking, purchased at seventeen and read cover to cover, is very special to me.

It's also bloody hilarious, in a dry way.

My favourite quote, in the section on Gingerbread Houses: "No matter how peculiar the medium or incongruous the scale, the instinct to build persists".


From: ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø, | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 08 December 2005 07:17 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
A staple cookbook for me is the Fannie Farmer cookbook, which is similar in scope to the Joy of Cooking. (I don't have my Joy of Cooking anymore - it was a soft-cover and fell apart and I've lost pieces out of it, etc.)

My mother absolutely swears by Joy. It's her cooking bible. Fannie's done fine by me when I want to get basic (and sometimes not so basic) recipes for North American standards. It's not so great on food from other parts of the world, though.

I used to have a Persian cookbook, which I think I lent to my aunt at one point and she may still have it. I think I tried a couple of things in it, but I was either not following the recipes or the person who wrote the book didn't cook them the way I was used to having it, because it didn't work out the way I wanted it to.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Tehanu
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 9854

posted 09 December 2005 10:06 AM      Profile for Tehanu     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Moosewood. Great recipe books, yummy stuff, easy to prepare -- and good for browsing just to get an idea of something more interesting to do with chickpeas than schrockling them up for yet another batch of hummus!

Plus from what I know about it Moosewood restaurant/collective is a pretty neat organization.


From: Desperately trying to stop procrastinating | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 09 December 2005 10:20 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
'Nother vote for Madhur Jaffrey here, and for all the big ole standard teaching bibles - to the lists of those above I would add Craig Claiborne's New York Times collections, where I've always been able to find a version of anything new I encountered eating out.

I have a whole pile of recipes that I was tearing out of magazines (mainly Gourmet and Canadian Living) in my more enthusiastic nesting days. Every once in a while I get ambitious and put a few more of those into pockets in a photo binder, but I know that I'm never going to produce most of those elaborate things. The ones that are both favourites and practical I already use often enough - the others I save out of some weird pack-rat anxiety, I think.

The Silver Palate cookbooks (from the shop in NY City) are great as well. Wonderful gingerbread recipe in the first one, eg - but don't spoil it with that orange drizzle, or at least I don't. I'm told that the one I don't have has the world's greatest recipe for meatloaf.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
rinne
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 9117

posted 09 December 2005 10:47 AM      Profile for rinne     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"I'm seconding this one as well. I learned to bake bread with this book." Me too, kurichina.

While "The Art of Eating" by MFK Fisher includes recipes, it is more than a cookbook.

"For my own meals I like simplicity above all. I like newness in what I serve, perhaps because any interest I may thus stir in my own fellow-diners is indirect flattery of myself. I like leisure.

I like mutual ease. For this reason I prefer not to have among my guests two people or more, of any sex, who are in the first wild tremors of love. It is better to invite them after their new passion has settled, has solidified into a quieter reciprocity of emotions. (It is also a waste of good food, to serve it to new lovers.)"

[ 09 December 2005: Message edited by: a citizen of winnipeg ]


From: prairies | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3674

posted 09 December 2005 11:47 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
there can be only one choice.


From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
alisea
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4222

posted 09 December 2005 11:50 AM      Profile for alisea     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Jane Grigson: "Fruit", "Vegetables", and "Bread". Historical essays, commentaries, techniques, and recipes from around the world.
From: Halifax, Nova Scotia | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 09 December 2005 11:51 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Is he on TV in Britain, WW? Seems to me that I've watched a wok-cookery show when I've been there.

Delia isn't the sexiest cook, but I did learn how to cook an omelette by watching her. Do not fear the high heat: you must be fast! It works, though - if you've got the right pan.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Mr. Magoo
guilty-pleasure
Babbler # 3469

posted 09 December 2005 11:58 AM      Profile for Mr. Magoo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Martin Yan had a good cooking show on Food a few years back, called Martin Yan's Chinatown, IIRC. His usual stuff, corny as ever, but his corniness is so persistent that he's impossible not to like.

Plus, when he smashes garlic with his cleaver, that rocks.

I have one of his little paperback cookbooks, and besides the recipes, it's full of little cartoons that he drew. You can imagine.


From: ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø, | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 09 December 2005 12:00 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I think that maybe I learned from him how to core a pepper - also with the cleaver. It is a quite neat technique. And to my amazement, we owned a cleaver. That is the one thing I use it for.
From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 09 December 2005 12:02 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh, I forgot: I also use the cleaver on turnips.

Transport turnip and cleaver out to front walk, or any handy piece of cement. Place turnip on cement. Embed cleaver with some force in turnip (mind the toes, though). Then smash embedded turnip against cement until it splits.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3674

posted 09 December 2005 12:02 PM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
no, skdadl, stephen yan was the inimitable pun-ishing of "wok with yan." i watched the show on CBC while it rained non-stop in summer 1981 in a cottage on sandy lake, manitoba.
From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
rubberbandman
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 8314

posted 11 December 2005 06:05 AM      Profile for rubberbandman     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
why a food thread not in body and soul?
From: bellow sea level | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2534

posted 11 December 2005 01:54 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Because it is about cookery (and other foodie) BOOKS.
From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Reality. Bites.
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6718

posted 11 December 2005 02:10 PM      Profile for Reality. Bites.        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
No discussion of cook books is complete without a mention of Billi Gordon's "You've had worse things in your mouth."
From: Gone for good | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 11 December 2005 02:17 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Or Peg Bracken's "I Hate To Cook Book" (1960). Surely college students leaving home for the first time are still clinging to Bracken as their first lifesaver?
From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
shaolin
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4270

posted 11 December 2005 08:49 PM      Profile for shaolin     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I vote for How It all Vegan and The Garden of Vegan - tasty stuff and lots of attitude. Go Vegan.net

I also get a lot of recipes from Vegetarian Times. The search function lets you specify egg free, dairy free, vegan, etc. One of my favourite recipes, a lingine primavera with cashew sauce is from there - yum!

[ 11 December 2005: Message edited by: shaolin ]


From: Edinburgh | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged
rubberbandman
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 8314

posted 12 December 2005 03:43 AM      Profile for rubberbandman     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
so if cookbooks have to be discussed in the book section does that mean politics books can't be discussed in the politics section?
From: bellow sea level | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Ninja Dragon Slayer
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 11481

posted 31 December 2005 03:13 PM      Profile for Ninja Dragon Slayer        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
My all-time favorite cook book is "Eat right, Live Longer". That has the BEST recipes in it.

Great for those tending toward vegetarian, actually, vegan, beause most of the recipes are dairy-free.

They went to a lot of trouble to provide really great tasting food - so far nothing I've tried has tasted anything but great.


From: a place that's safer than Toronto | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
Amy
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2210

posted 31 December 2005 10:35 PM      Profile for Amy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
TheRebar cookbook has some super tasty things in it, and there are often alternatives listed at the bottom of the page, if you are missing or dont like a particular ingredient.

I am not overly fond of cookbooks though, since I tend to be the "country measure" type as well, and resist most recipes unless the thing I am attempting is especially difficult or new to me.

(Kurichina, I like that term a lot).


From: the whole town erupts and/ bursts into flame | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged

All times are Pacific Time  

Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic    Move Topic    Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
Hop To:

Contact Us | rabble.ca | Policy Statement

Copyright 2001-2008 rabble.ca