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Author Topic: Who da man?
Babbling_Jenn
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 10944

posted 01 December 2005 12:53 PM      Profile for Babbling_Jenn     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The position of black Canadians, and black male Canadians is such a complex, but important issue that I'm glad to see this book in the review section this week.

Most striking in the review was this line:

quote:
Does Canada's reluctance to fully engage with its black culture point toward a national soul not as unblemished and free of racism as we're often led to believe, not as innocent as a bouncing basketball or a javelin's clean arc?—

It gave me pause.

It is true that black culture in Canada is almost seen as "un-Canadian" though white people are the first to point to the black community when the need to prove multiculturalism is present.

It is almost as though Canadian does not encapsulate the black community. Should it?

I'm not sure.


From: Rural Ontario | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged
tallyho
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 10917

posted 01 December 2005 02:18 PM      Profile for tallyho        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
What's a white person? a Swede or an Afghani? What's a black person? A 6th generation Canadians in Preston, Nova Scotian or a Somali just off the plane in Calgary or a Haitian in Montreal? All have very different social,and religious backgrounds and live in very different communities.

It's hard to 'generalize about generalizations'. I've only been to one Black African country, Nigeria, and only to 10% of that country. I saw more diversity among the 'Blacks' in that 10% than between any groups in all of Canada.

In the USA the 'Black male' is a critical mass of 15 million individuals who came from slave roots, etc. It usually doesn't mean the other million or so American black males of more recent origins. A 'black male' in the USA is like saying 'French' in Canada...we know it usually means Quebecois, etc. and not the fellow just in from Brussels.


From: The NDP sells out Alberta workers | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged
Makwa
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 10724

posted 01 December 2005 02:33 PM      Profile for Makwa   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by tallyho:
What's a black person? A 6th generation Canadians in Preston, Nova Scotian or a Somali just off the plane in Calgary or a Haitian in Montreal?
Yes. Mostly it's about those who define themselves as Black. All people of African descent that I have ever known or read have identified themselves as black as a socially constructed awareness of their position in a global white supremacist history. Of course Black people are quite aware of cultural and historical differences among groups and nation states. This is not what 'white' and 'black' is about. To try to make this claim is to sidestep the issues whereby peoples lives and roles are conditioned within a context of white supremacist culture.
quote:
In the USA the 'Black male' is a critical mass of 15 million individuals who came from slave roots, etc. It usually doesn't mean the other million or so American black males of more recent origins. A 'black male' in the USA is like saying 'French' in Canada...we know it usually means Quebecois, etc. and not the fellow just in from Brussels.

Nonsense. Black people anywhere in the globe whether from Africa, the West Indies, Canada or England or France are perfectly able to identify as 'black' in the context of international white cultural domination and historical imperialism.

From: Here at the glass - all the usual problems, the habitual farce | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged
Rundler
editor
Babbler # 2699

posted 01 December 2005 03:10 PM      Profile for Rundler     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I wanted to raise another issue about sport. Has anyone seen Roller Ball? The Norman Jewison movie from the 70s? Here's a synopsis:

In the year 2018, violence and crime have been totally eliminated from society and given outlet in the brutal blood sport of rollerball, a high-velocity blend of football, hockey, and motor-cross racing sponsored by the multinational corporations that now control the world following the collapse of traditional politics. James Caan plays Jonathan E., the reigning superstar of rollerball, whose corporate controllers fear that Jonathan's popularity has endowed him with too much power. They begin to pressure him according to their own ruthless set of rules, but Jonathan has rules of his own--the rules of a man determined to retain his soul in a world gone mad. Rollerball creates a believable society that's been rendered passive and compliant by the homogenization of corporate dictatorships, where the control and flow of information is the only currency of any importance. It's a world in which natural human aggressions have been sublimated and vented through the religious fervor toward rollerball and its players.

It doesn't deal with race and ethnicity in relation to all this, but this review made me think about how big-money sport functions in our culture.


From: the murky world of books books books | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged
Rundler
editor
Babbler # 2699

posted 01 December 2005 03:10 PM      Profile for Rundler     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh, by the way, the review we're talking about can be found here: www.rabble.ca/reviews
From: the murky world of books books books | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged
Makwa
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 10724

posted 01 December 2005 03:26 PM      Profile for Makwa   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Rundler:
I wanted to raise another issue about sport. Has anyone seen Roller Ball? The Norman Jewison movie from the 70s? Here's a synopsis:...It doesn't deal with race and ethnicity in relation to all this, but this review made me think about how big-money sport functions in our culture.
Ooooh, I loved that movie. Massive pipe organs thundering Bach's Toccata and Fugue in D minor. Shivers.

From: Here at the glass - all the usual problems, the habitual farce | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged
Rundler
editor
Babbler # 2699

posted 01 December 2005 03:28 PM      Profile for Rundler     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm so glad I'm not the only one.
From: the murky world of books books books | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged

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