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Author Topic: Candy from strangers
Rundler
editor
Babbler # 2699

posted 10 November 2005 10:03 AM      Profile for Rundler     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
If the double threat of marketing and media are to blame for violent and consumerist messages being driven into our youngest generations, then does it follow that "m. & m." can be part of the solution? (Check out a new review at www.rabble.ca/reviews of a book that explores just that.)
From: the murky world of books books books | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 10 November 2005 11:46 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
This book looks interesting. I like the fact that he's not one of those types that appears to shift all the blame onto the marketers. It IS possible to make it so that your kids aren't exposed to as many advertisements - they don't HAVE to watch television. You don't HAVE to have cable.

You can also make it so that your kids are CRITICAL of advertisements, although that does require that you spend time with them when they watch television, even if you're not actually watching the show yourself. I've got myself a nice little six year-old budding sceptic on my hands because we deconstruct the commercials from the shows he watches. It's hilarious to hear his knee-jerk, "They're probably lying, right mom?" when some stupid toy commercial comes on that makes a toy look like it's more fun than it actually is, or, "That's full of sugar" when junk food comes on.

And when he starts with the, "Oh, I WANT THAT" (which he doesn't do quite as much anymore although, being a kid responding to slick marketing, of course he does it occasionally), and keeps on going on about it, I tell him that we can't buy everything he sees on television, and that if he keeps begging when he sees the commercials, that will be the end of television for the day. Works like a charm.

I would be interested to see what he says about economics and family life contributing to the phenomenon of letting the television and internet babysit the kids. I think he might be right; on the other hand, as a mother of a child who watches a fair bit of television, I think there are ways for parents to take some responsibility for teaching their kids to be critical thinkers about what they see on television, especially the ads.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 10 November 2005 11:50 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
(Although personally, I'd like to see rules here in Ontario like the ones they have in Quebec, where it's illegal to direct advertising towards children, if I remember correctly. The ads I've seen directed at children are so manipulative!)
From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Rundler
editor
Babbler # 2699

posted 10 November 2005 11:58 AM      Profile for Rundler     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Cigarette companies have based their business on marketing to kids.
From: the murky world of books books books | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged
brebis noire
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7136

posted 10 November 2005 12:03 PM      Profile for brebis noire     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I didn't know we had laws like that here - sometimes it's hard to tell if they're targeting kids or adults, such as with a certain chewy granola bar commercial I remember all too well. But any laws like that are easy to circumvent with cable and satellite.

My approach is to let them watch, watch with them, point things out and ask questions. My seven-year-old already knows how publicity lies, and he seems to use commercials more as a source of information, to find out 'what's out there' and decide if he really wants it or not.

I really do hate those toy commercials that make it seem like the whole shebang operates by itself, in a magical kind of world. Really, really hate those ones.


From: Quebec | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Mr. Magoo
guilty-pleasure
Babbler # 3469

posted 10 November 2005 12:15 PM      Profile for Mr. Magoo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I think there are ways for parents to take some responsibility for teaching their kids to be critical thinkers about what they see on television, especially the ads.

Seems more sensible than simply isolating them until they reach 18, then setting the world loose on them.

I do find it incredibly funny though that adults seem, for the most part, naturally skeptical when it comes to politicians, used-car salesmen, and people who buttonhole you on the sidewalk — nobody seems to need a special "media literacy" course to understand that each of these wants something from you, and is possibly prepared to try and convince you to give it — but when it's an ad on television it's somehow different.

How can anyone who's not a little child NOT understand the purpose of advertising?? Who could possibly believe that an ad is going to be altruistic, and take our interests to heart rather than their own? I've never understood anyone who sees advertisements as anything but the sales pitches that they are. Once you understand that an ad is a biased account of a product or service, designed to entice you to consider paying for that product or service, it's remarkably easy to ignore them.


From: ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø, | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
Rundler
editor
Babbler # 2699

posted 10 November 2005 01:05 PM      Profile for Rundler     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Does anyone think, as Stephen Dale suggests, that the widespread critique of media and marketing has been used as a smokescreen to allow family-supporting policies to die on the House floor? (Or never even make it that far?)
From: the murky world of books books books | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 10 November 2005 01:33 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Mr. Magoo:
How can anyone who's not a little child

That would appear to be the point. We're talking about advertising to children.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged

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