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Author Topic: Great Canadian Poets?
Rue Kelly
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posted 31 October 2005 02:29 PM      Profile for Rue Kelly     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm new, but would like to hear who people think are great Canadian poets.

Are there any?


From: Vancouver Island | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged
obscurantist
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Babbler # 8238

posted 31 October 2005 02:46 PM      Profile for obscurantist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
My personal favourites: for adults, Tom Wayman, and for kids, Dennis Lee (Alligator Pie, etc.).

Do you have any favourite Canadian poets, Rue?


From: an unweeded garden | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Makwa
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 10724

posted 31 October 2005 02:57 PM      Profile for Makwa   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Rue Kelly:
great Canadian poets.
Peggy (Margaret) Atwood. Hate her so-called novels. Dionne Brand.

From: Here at the glass - all the usual problems, the habitual farce | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 31 October 2005 03:10 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
All those are good -- I have special affection for Tom Wayman too, obscurantist -- I think you reminded me of that recently.

There is a long list of wonderful mid-century poets, Earle Birney and Al Purdy and contemporaries, eg. I think that Phyllis Webb is still writing -- I have often enjoyed her journalism as much as her poems.

Our great wit so far, our Pope, perhaps, was F.R. Scott. He is wonderful to read: his poetry tickles the brain, and when it is angry, it is searingly intelligently angry.

I haven't read enough of Anne Carson, but the whole world now seems agreed that she is a Great Poet.

Gwendolyn McEwan was a singularity. George Bowering is still wonderful to read, and as a prose writer as well. Of the younger poets I've read, I especially like Erin Moure.

I'm not sure that searching for the greats is the best way to read poetry, though. I've always learned more by immersing in a generation, reading as much laterally as I could. Writers inform one another, I think.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
neoluddite
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 9130

posted 31 October 2005 03:21 PM      Profile for neoluddite     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Leonard Cohen, Irving Layton, and A.M. Klein are my favourites. Apparently, both Klein and Layton were active in the CCF-- something interesting I just learned recently.
From: halifax | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged
Sharon
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Babbler # 4090

posted 31 October 2005 03:22 PM      Profile for Sharon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Sue MacLeod is a wonderful poet. Please try to find her books -- you won't be disappointed.

And Alden Nowlan. He was one of the great poets (and also, a good friend of mine.)


From: Halifax, Nova Scotia | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 31 October 2005 03:43 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Alden Nowlan -- there's another poet I knew better through his essays. He was a wonderful writer and a wonderful man, Sharon -- I never met him, but I could just tell.
From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Adam T
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4631

posted 31 October 2005 06:05 PM      Profile for Adam T     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
No forum dominated by New Democrats should have a discussion of poetry without the name F.R Scott coming up.
From: Richmond B.C | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
Sharon
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Babbler # 4090

posted 31 October 2005 06:24 PM      Profile for Sharon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Our great wit so far, our Pope, perhaps, was F.R. Scott. He is wonderful to read: his poetry tickles the brain, and when it is angry, it is searingly intelligently angry.

I think you missed skdadl's post above, Adam T.


From: Halifax, Nova Scotia | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
Adam T
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4631

posted 31 October 2005 09:47 PM      Profile for Adam T     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
So I did
From: Richmond B.C | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
Rundler
editor
Babbler # 2699

posted 13 November 2005 05:07 PM      Profile for Rundler     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
A personal favourite of mine -- and I do mean personal -- is Rachel Zolf. Yes (full disclosure), she's my partner, but she's also an amazing Canadian poet. Her most recent book, Masque (mercury press), was nominated for the Trillium Book Award for poetry and... I could go on but that's probably a little irritating. But really, Masque is a fantastic book.
From: the murky world of books books books | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged
mayakovsky
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5171

posted 13 November 2005 06:55 PM      Profile for mayakovsky     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
For me there is Todd Swift, Maggie Helwig, Gary Geddes
From: New Bedford | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
Rundler
editor
Babbler # 2699

posted 14 November 2005 10:43 AM      Profile for Rundler     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Also, check out some of the interviewees on rabble radio: M. Nourbese Philip is a genius. Margaret Christakos is too.
From: the murky world of books books books | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged
sarabble
recent-rabble-rouser
Babbler # 10937

posted 14 November 2005 01:14 PM      Profile for sarabble     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I was at Ottawa's Collected Works bookstore just before Halloween and heard Richard Harrison and Oana Avasilichioaei read from their recently published poetry books. Harrison had a refreshing way of playing with words and Avasilichioaei really made this strange world of Romanian legend come alive in her work. I was very impressed with the strong imagery both used.

I was also impressed that neither literally 'read' their works to the audience at the bookstore; rather, they 'performed' their works. They had both memorized the selection of poems, and 'recited' (but with more oomph that a usual recitation) them for us. It was very engaging.

I wonder if this is a trend or movement in the poetry scene. Anyone here know about this?


From: The Capital | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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Babbler # 3807

posted 14 November 2005 08:01 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Al Purdy

"I was justly annoyed 10 years ago
in Vancouver: making beer in a crock
under the kitchen table when this
next-door youngster playing with my own
kid managed to sit down in it and
emerged with one end malted -
With excessive moderation I yodelled
at him
"Keep your ass out of my beer!"
and the little monster fled -
Whereupon my wife appeared from the bathroom
where she had been brooding for days
over the injustice of being a woman and
attacked me with a broom -
With commendable savoir faire I broke
the broom across my knee (it hurt too) and
then she grabbed the breadknife and made
for me with fairly obvious intentions -
I tore open my shirt and told her calmly
with bared breast and a minimum of boredom
"Go ahead! Strike! Go ahead!"
Icicles dropped from her fiery eyes as she
snarled
"I wouldn't want to go to jail
for killing a thing like you!"
I could see at once that she loved me
tho it was cleverly concealed -
For the next few weeks I had to distribute
the meals she prepared among neighbouring
dogs because of the rat poison and
addressed her as Missus Borgia -
That was a long time ago and while
at the time I deplored her lack of
self-control I find myself sentimental
about it now for it can never happen again -

Sept. 22, 1964: PS, I was wrong "

I'm biased, probably because I was once allowed to look through his archives while researching every edition of the above poem. It was like looking through someone's kitchen drawers.


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
pebbles
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6400

posted 14 November 2005 09:07 PM      Profile for pebbles     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
James McIntyre!

http://www.poemhunter.com/james-mcintyre/poet-6599/

http://www.swiftandbored.com/mcintyre/

Ode on the Mammoth Cheese

Weight over seven thousand pounds.

We have seen thee, queen of cheese,
Lying quietly at your ease,
Gently fanned by evening breeze,
Thy fair form no flies dare seize.
All gaily dressed soon you'll go
To the great Provincial show,
To be admired by many a beau
In the city of Toronto.
Cows numerous as a swarm of bees,
Or as the leaves upon the trees,
It did require to make thee please.
And stand unrivalled, queen of cheese.
May you not receive a scar as
We have heard that Mr. Harris
Intends to to send you off as far as
The great world's show at Paris.
Of the youth beware of these,
For some of them might rudely squeeze
And bite your cheek, then songs or glees
We could not sing, oh! queen of cheese.

We'rt thou suspended from balloon,
You'd cast a shade even at noon,
Folks would think it was the moon
About to fall and crush them soon.


From: Canada | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Hephaestion
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4795

posted 14 November 2005 09:22 PM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
goodness, that's a large URL, pebbles!
From: goodbye... :-( | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4790

posted 14 November 2005 09:51 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
TELLING THE DIFFERENCE: MICHAEL VS. A CROCODILE
by SARAH STEINBERG

This is a jackhammer with a fixed centre.

Fact: Crocodiles don't make omelets in my kitchen on football Sunday and flip back and forth between the game and me and the Discovery channel. They don't cook omelets in my kitchen and use up three of my eggs, leave dirty dishes in my sink, filled ashtrays and unwrapped zucchini which I told you would go bad if it wasn't wrapped up and

Think astronomy, think planets turning on their axis

Crocodiles don't flip back and forth between football Sunday and make-out Saturday and drunken Friday and flip back and forth between bringing me salad and berating me in the kitchen and making an omelet, such a dainty food thing, and asking me too many questions, berating me between flip back and forth between

This is a corkscrew ripping into the neck of the bottle,
Turning, spinning, swirling into the body of the wine.

running your hands up my legs my thighs my feet on your legs
flipping back and forth between massages and foul language
between me or the t.v. between the sheets between then and now
they don't fall in love and then out between now and then they
don't call at four in the morning and

A steering wheel, including the hands of the driver

ask if they can come over, then not and apologize later, then
do it again. They make no pretense about the cut of their teeth.
They don't cook their meat.

A fulcrum.
A pirouette.

Headlight mag


From: Out from under the bridge and out for a stroll | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged

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