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Author Topic: Reviews?
audra trower williams
rabble-rouser
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posted 24 February 2005 11:03 AM      Profile for audra trower williams   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Have you read any? Do you want to post one of your own? Do it here.
From: And I'm a look you in the eye for every bar of the chorus | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Judes
publisher
Babbler # 21

posted 26 February 2005 04:17 PM      Profile for Judes   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
You can read the review in the Globe. Other than calling me an armchair feminist Ha it is excellentThere is nothing like those dames
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Tommy_Paine
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 214

posted 26 February 2005 07:53 PM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I picked up "Ten Thousand Roses" last night, and I'm about at the end of chapter 2. I find myself reading a bit, then thinking about it alot. Probably an indication of just how little I know about the history of the women's movement in Canada.
From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Sharon
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4090

posted 26 February 2005 08:06 PM      Profile for Sharon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Globe and Mail review is by Marian Botsford Fraser. Judy, to be fair, she didn't call you an "armchair feminist."

quote:
Rebick ends with a brief essay that is exhausted and a little sad in tone. It is over, this great wave of feminism. She takes a half-hearted stab at the smug critics who blame the decline of the movement on identity politics. She finds tremulous hope in the gentle image of the Indian writer Arundhati Roy, of a female world, in the future: "On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." But Rebick herself sounds resigned to sitting in a lawn chair on the sidelines.

Marian's only criticisms of the book come when she wants more: more detail, more history, more perspective and analysis. But when a reviewer only wants more, I think it's a pretty damn good review. On balance, I think Marian did a good job and I think she really liked the book. She also sounds very optimistic about the future of feminism.


From: Halifax, Nova Scotia | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 27 February 2005 12:10 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yes, the review is lively, and I think it conveys a sense of how lively the book is, how well the interviews work and what a broad range they cover.

Lawn chairs -- ha! Wait till us old grils join the Raging Grannies.

That comes in volume 2, yes, Judes?


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2534

posted 27 February 2005 06:18 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
With respect to the Globe review, I will point out that Simone de Beauvoir's Deuxième Sexe was written much earlier than the Feminine Mystique, and published in 1949.
From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Judes
publisher
Babbler # 21

posted 03 March 2005 12:15 PM      Profile for Judes   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Today's NOW has a review It's not over yet

She too assumes that I am saying that feminism is dead. What I am saying is that second wave feminism is dead. I do know about third wave feminism but I don't see it as a mass movement yet.


From: Toronto | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
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Babbler # 2534

posted 03 March 2005 12:26 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The World March of Women www.marchemondiale.org was still going strong in 2000 and has since given rise to the Women's Charter for Humanity. Of course the strength of the march itself this year - or rather, the many marches, remains to be seen. But it remains a development stemming from "second wave" feminism, no?
From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 214

posted 04 March 2005 10:25 AM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Okay, okay, I'm itching to put up my two cents worth on the book, but I really think I should read it all first. It's been a tough week for reading, I have only been able to grab a moment here and there, and I really hate reading like that.

A few things have struck me though, both positive and negative.

But what strikes me most is how brave a book it is.


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Judes
publisher
Babbler # 21

posted 06 March 2005 10:35 AM      Profile for Judes   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Here is a review by Lynn Crosbie in the Toronto Star Those were the days my friend

She doesn't like the book much and sees it as a lament for the good old days. I disagree of course but I would be interested in the reaction of babblers who have read the book or parts of it. There's my favourite pic of myself for those who can get the Star on paper


From: Toronto | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
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posted 06 March 2005 10:59 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Two days! Two days and I will have my copy. After reading this thread and those reviews, I'm dying to bury my nose in this book.
From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
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Babbler # 214

posted 06 March 2005 11:46 AM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I think the reviewer didn't read the subtitle. This is first and foremost a history book, a much needed history book. It's no more a lament for the good old days as any other history book is, unless you want it to be.

I'm not reading it in that light. I'm seeing it as a history, and also as a tutorial on activism and how to get things done.

I think if the author would have included her own voice more often in the book she would have been criticised for being an egomaniac, or of self agrandisement.

No pleasing some people, as a raggedy Rabbi once said. Which is why authors shouldn't read reviews and criticisms -- except, of course, any I might offer-- and just keep writting.

Damn the reviews, full speed ahead.

I haven't got far enough to say much about the other criticisms.


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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Babbler # 478

posted 06 March 2005 11:58 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I often think that Lynn Crosbie wants to have her cake and eat it too.

She is so desperate to prove herself edgy, as with those strange early references to "former Black Panthers" (they are a force on the current scene?) or anti-war/globalisation protestors who "take facefuls of Mace for the team."

Hey, Lynn! You didn't notice how and when rabble.ca got founded? The Quebec summit? Lotsa early babblers, including author of book you are reviewing, took a few lungfuls of tear gas for the team? And watch our Activism forum for the next anti-war march coming to a downtown near you.

And then Crosbie goes on to do the most conservative readings possible of the October Crisis and the Montreal Massacre.

Mebbe I'm too old, but I just can't take Crosbie seriously. She writes for herself about herself. I can think of a lot of older people who do that too, mind.

[ 06 March 2005: Message edited by: skdadl ]


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 214

posted 06 March 2005 12:23 PM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well, the reviewer's comments on the October Crisis weren't terribly well reasoned.

I was eleven at the time. I reasoned that if they sent my Dad off to fight a German regime that suspended civil liberties, then to do honour to his efforts and the sacrifices of others in the name of freedom, there was little choice but to stand (as much as an eleven year old could) against the Liberals instituting Martial Law over a police matter.

I know there's other views on this. I just don't have enough of the Goose Stepper in me to see them, I guess.


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
janew
webmistress
Babbler # 199

posted 06 March 2005 01:09 PM      Profile for janew     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Here's the favourite photo Judes is talking about. Not a great scan, but you get the picture.

That's certainly a good-sized spread in the Star.
(here's a photo

I'm looking forward to reading the book. I was surprised by the review because I think Judy 'gets' third-wavers better than the rest of us second-wavers do.


From: Toronto, Ontario | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2534

posted 06 March 2005 02:17 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Lynn Crosbie is a liar. Men were never denied access to the memorials to the young women massacred at Polytechnique - I was there at Université de Montréal. Nobody ever said they should be. As for the "young women", Crosbie is recounting the words of one young woman targeted by a berserk gunman, pleading for her life. (Moreover, engineering had never been at the forefront of student movements for social change). On the contrary, in the aftermath of the massacre, some of the Polytechnique students stepped aside from promising career paths to campaign for gun control and against violence to women.

She is silly too. Canadian - and Québec - feminism was in many ways far more penetrating than its US counterpart, as it was more connected with movements resisting capitalism to various degrees, whether the left movements many of us came from, the trade unions, the NDP and left social and nationalist movements in Québec etc. Its greater class-consciousness has also made it more durable than its US counterpart.

Her comments about the War Measures Act are utterly heinous. The FLQ kidnappings and assassination could have been - and were - handled by normal police work. The government took advantage of the violence of a small, marginal and most incompetent group to target its perceived enemies.


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Bacchus
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4722

posted 06 March 2005 07:09 PM      Profile for Bacchus     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
What a minute. I have constantly read that there were )and are) many a memorial for the victims in which men were expressly told not to be there (especially the candlight walk here in toronto which happens every year). Could she be referencing that? Its certainly a toronto-centric thing since I dont know about montreal memorials but it certainly was a fact here which doesnt make her a liar.
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lagatta
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2534

posted 06 March 2005 07:24 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Naturally, being not only from Montréal but a student at U de M at the time of the massacre - I was writing an exam in a nearby building, just the opposite side of the main one - I was thinking of memorials in Montréal. I really don't know much about memorials in the RoC aka "English Canada" or in any other countries.

Radical feminism was at a low ebb then - so, alas, was socialist feminism - so I doubt there were any memorials in Montréal that were women only.

If she is referring to the reaction in Montréal among Polytechnique students and others, and then to possible memorials elsewhere in the world, then her article is even more garbled than I thought.

I attended a memorial the day after - we walked up the side of the mountain, in the cold - and nobody would have said anything about it being women only, students only or engineers only. Everyone was welcome, as we shivered there trying to keep our candles alight.


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Bacchus
rabble-rouser
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posted 07 March 2005 01:44 AM      Profile for Bacchus     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The candlelight walk here near U of T is still for women only, as is the Take back the night marches the swelled in attendance after the massacre
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meades
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Babbler # 625

posted 07 March 2005 01:59 AM      Profile for meades     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Take Back the Night is quite a bit different. How can men take back the night? They kind of already have it. Demanding participation is just even more hogging of public space.
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skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 07 March 2005 08:09 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It is quite wrong to say, of the Take Back the Night marches, that men are told "not to be there." If men wish to come out in support, that is entirely welcome, but as meades has said, it is important for men to recognize what "in support" means -- it doesn't mean joining the march or expecting their usual high public profile. The point is for women to reclaim some public space and freedom. Why is it so hard to grasp that?
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Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 07 March 2005 08:14 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Exactly. And many feminists have invited men to meet them AFTER the march - in fact, I think I've heard of guys organizing refreshments and such afterwards (gee, what a switch, huh?). Heaven forbid women should take centre stage in a - get this - FEMINIST MARCH. To take back the night!

Besides, I have a feeling, from the various protest marches I've seen in Toronto, that if men were to join the march, it would probably be joined by a bunch of people with other issues. I can see it now, the Free Palestine guys that come to every protest no matter what the protest is supposed to be about, marching in Take Back The Night with their Palestinian flag.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Bacchus
rabble-rouser
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posted 07 March 2005 10:20 AM      Profile for Bacchus     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
*smiles* Please dont understand, Im not arguing FOR the participation. In fact, knowing my preference, I would be the one cooking and preparing refreshments for afterwards. As long as they praised my food of course

I was just pointing out that call the lady a liar is not correct as there were a fair number of events that were specifically not for men at the time


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swallow
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Babbler # 2659

posted 07 March 2005 01:35 PM      Profile for swallow     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
And, to be fair, quite a few (including at UofT) at which men were welcomed.
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Coyote
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posted 07 March 2005 01:37 PM      Profile for Coyote   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I can see it now, the Free Palestine guys that come to every protest no matter what the protest is supposed to be about, marching in Take Back The Night with their Palestinian flag.
Or the "legalize it!" guys. They are ubiquitous.

From: O’ for a good life, we just might have to weaken. | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged
Mr. Magoo
guilty-pleasure
Babbler # 3469

posted 07 March 2005 01:42 PM      Profile for Mr. Magoo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Now, now. What kind of solidarity is that? If you won't show solidarity with everyone, from the Anti-occupation guys to the Legalize it stoners to the Disabled and Two-Spirited Dyslexic Garment Workers of Chiapas, who will??
From: ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø, | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
Coyote
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posted 07 March 2005 04:25 PM      Profile for Coyote   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Definitely not you, Magoo. Definitely not you.
From: O’ for a good life, we just might have to weaken. | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 08 March 2005 07:41 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Rim shot, Coyote.
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Tommy_Paine
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 214

posted 08 March 2005 10:14 PM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Okay, so here goes.


I said earlier that this was a brave book. Coming from a trade union back ground, specifically the CAW, and posessing a profound ignorance on the history of the women's movement in Canada, I was impressed by what I would consider so much "dirty laundry" being aired out.

But that is the main theme I see running through this book. About how major rifts, major differences in backgrounds can be over come in an organization, or umbrella organizations.

There's a lesson in here for organizations that put such a high price on "solidarity" that it squelches honest debate and honest diversity of opinion.

Did I mention I have a CAW background?

I have a few criticisms. One is a matter of style preference. I'd rather if the quotes at the top of each chapter were in bold, and the background supplied by the author done in italics. Don't ask me why. I just thought it would look better that way.

I was dissapointed with the chapter "Solidarity and Sisterhood". I think it lacked stories from women involved in manufacturing unions. As a CAW member, I think it would have been both interesting and instructive to hear about the difficulties our sister's had in the union finding a voice, and dealing with the male establishement.

Judy Darcy was the only one to mention the Fleck Strike. It would have been interesting to hear how this strike may or may not have influenced then UAW Canada's attitude towards women members.

I know it influenced me.

There is some coverage of manufacturing unions, with Debbie Field's recounting of getting into Stelco in "Closing the Wage Gap." I could have enjoyed more stories like that.

I thought the chapter "Not a Love Story" could have been longer, I got the sense that it was a hurried chapter.

Of course, I have quibbles about philosophy, but I'm not going to take that apart, that's a different thread. Except--and I just spent a few moments looking for the record and I can't find it-- about getting more women-- 50%, if memory serves, into the Senate. I know politics is about pragmatism. But there's enough of the idealogue left in me to kinda go absolutely batshit that anyone would want to take part in something we should be abolishing by any means necessary. I'm not interested in adjusting an anachronistic, anti-democratic wannabe aristocratic body, because no good can come of it.

I do seem to be a cult of one on the subject of that particular boil on the bottom of the body politic. Private bugaboo, I guess.

That's about it for the negative stuff.

As I said before, I was impressed by the willingness of the author to talk about the diversity within the women's movement. I was astounded to hear the difficulties that lesbian women, women of colour and aboriginal women hadwithin the women's movement. And, again, I tthink it is the defining strength of the women's movement that they were able to find ways to deal with diversity, to become inclusive, and to turn what could be a weakness into a driving force for progress.

The record of accomplishments speaks for itself.

I don't like long posts, but I can't conclude without talking about what really struck me most, what I'm going to take away.

For that I have to turn to Gail Stacey-Moore in "Indian Rights for Indian Women":

"Even people who I thought were advanced in their thinking said hurtful things. All of this doesn't mean you can't work together and treat each other with respect."

Of all the women in this book, I thought her the wisest, and most courageous.

Similarly, Akua Benjamin in "It's Not Just About Identity":

"Let me give you and example of mixed black and white group and you have personal experience with an issue. But instead of dealing with how that issue has effected you internally, you spew it out into the room and start taking it out on a white ally. And the ally becomes almost the perpetrator of your experience."

Benjamin identifies perhaps the major pitfalls of building alliances, a barrier of communication and a major source of allienation amoungst various groups, not just in the women's movement, but on the left in general. You can substitute anything you like for "black" and "white" in that statement, and probably find you've been on the recieving, and attacking end of that situtation.

Just two very wise women I'll remember from this book.

[ 08 March 2005: Message edited by: Tommy_Paine ]


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
malcontent
Babbler # 621

posted 09 March 2005 02:12 AM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Judes:
Here is a review by Lynn Crosbie in the Toronto Star Those were the days my friend

She doesn't like the book much and sees it as a lament for the good old days. I disagree of course but I would be interested in the reaction of babblers who have read the book or parts of it. There's my favourite pic of myself for those who can get the Star on paper


Lynn Crosbie's review, like her bratty Globe column, really pissed me off. She's so invested in being "edgy". Perhaps if she'd concentrated less on finding those clever turns of phrases, and more on the book, she might have had something interesting and relevant to say about it. My impression was that she'd read a few pages at the beginning and a few at the end, and a few in the middle. Why? Because she says:


quote:
The problem with the inclusion of these voices is that they are not integrated but merely patched in, which hinders the narrative, diminishing the authority of Rebick's voice and presence.

I mean, HUH? It's an oral history. What does Crosbie think an oral history should look like? This isn't an author-written narrative. There are introductions to each chapter, and the chapters consist of interviews. Christ! It's like the Peter Mansbridge interview with Margaret Thatcher when her memoirs came out -- Thatcher nailed him on air by starting an answer, "Well, as you would know if you had read the book, Peter..."

Also, why is it that so many self-described "third wavers", particularly intellectuals and writers, are so defensive about the idea that there isn't really a movement now? I mean, IS there a movement? And if so, what is it? And what makes it a movement, as opposed to an intellectual or academic orientation, an attitude or an ethic? First and second wave feminism ORGANIZED to achieve political goals. Is this happening in any real way among self-described "third wavers"? When I read Crosbie's defensive lashing, methinks she doth protest too much. In any case, the book is an oral history, and it stops SHORT of what would be the "third wave" anyhow.


From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Judes
publisher
Babbler # 21

posted 09 March 2005 09:56 PM      Profile for Judes   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Here is a letter in response to the Crosbie review by another third waver, our own Lisa Rundle, a former editor of rabble. Response to Crosbie
From: Toronto | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
fern hill
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posted 20 March 2005 01:36 PM      Profile for fern hill        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I got to Chapter 3, wasn't finding it very interesting or well-written and started to skip. Then I put it down. I doubt I'll pick it up again. My two cents. . .
From: away | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
kingblake
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posted 20 March 2005 02:06 PM      Profile for kingblake     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Ouch. I found the book fantastic, well put together, and illuminating. Lots of conflict, lots of dirty laundry, some sob stories, much disheartening, but honest.
From: In Regina, the land of Exotica | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
baba yaga
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posted 20 March 2005 06:56 PM      Profile for baba yaga     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Judy is on Richler Ink tonight at 6 PM (repeats at 1 am) on the Canadian Learning Television channel (cable), on a show called "Women Writing Dangerously":

quote:
RICHLER INK - Womyn Writing Dangerously
Episode 17/Womyn Writing Dangerously
Authors Tamara Faith Berger (The Way of the Whore), Susan Swan (What Casanova Told Me), Judy Rebick (Ten Thousand Roses, The Making of a Feminist Revolution) and NOW Magazine's Susan G. Cole talk about what it means to push social, sexual and political boundaries with their writing. Velma Demerson's "Incorrigible" is her story of being incarcerated sixty years ago for living with her Chinese-Canadian fiancé.

From: urban forests | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged
steffie
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posted 20 March 2005 10:37 PM      Profile for steffie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
So far, I find the "in our own words" format far superior to other histories, which go on like, "... and then this happened (to these people), and then this happened (to those people)..." and such. The voices in Roses transport me back through time and facilitate my understanding about what it was like to be a woman "back then." This is quite helpful to one such as I, who has grown up surrounded by the rights and freedoms and opportunities that those (these) women fought so hard for. They took risks, big risks. I dare say I don't think I possess such courage.
From: What are the roots that clutch, what branches grow / Out of this stony rubbish? | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
Judes
publisher
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posted 24 March 2005 03:24 PM      Profile for Judes   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I know it's a bit late but for Southern Ontario babblers or those who like to click on cbc.ca, I'll be the house guest on the Here and Now show from 4pm to 6 pm on CBC Radio One. I'll also be on Fresh Air tomorrow at 8:35 am for early risers.
From: Toronto | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
N.Beltov
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posted 24 March 2005 03:41 PM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Any oral his/herstory is good in my books. While I haven't finished the whole book yet, I am struck by the analytic quality of many of the contributors. It reads like an activist's his/herstory which is great for learning lessons from the past. A resource.

Question: What about a hard copy of the interviews? Any chance they can be kept in a Provincial Archives for permanent safe-keeping?


From: Vancouver Island | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
John_D
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posted 24 March 2005 07:40 PM      Profile for John_D     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I heard a small portion of Here and Now on my drive home, and I haven't noticed anyone else mentioning it yet. I caught a few minutes on either side of the news at five - didn't hear that much about the book, but I did catch a favourable reference to our very own moderator. Does any of the show get rebroadcast later in the day? (I know some of the Current and Sounds Like Canada gets replayed at night, but I'm not sure about the local content.)
From: Workin' 9 to 2 in the 902. | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
N.Beltov
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posted 31 March 2005 08:24 AM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
There was a review in Uptown of April 24 here in Winnipeg. Dunno if there is a link but it was positive, if brief.

Uptown magazine

[ 31 March 2005: Message edited by: N.Beltov ]


From: Vancouver Island | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
Ginger
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posted 31 March 2005 12:59 PM      Profile for Ginger   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I thought you may like to know that my daughter is currently working on a gr 7 project in history, she has spent some time thinking about what she will create. It must be hand made : )
Other students have made items such as a quilt with squares showing Canadian history events, a book made out of homemade paper. 10,000 roses has sparked some covnersation between my daughter and I - thank you. She has now decided to create a journal, but in the words of a woman who was born 1918, and track her struggles, her feminist fights too!, and create a life history combined with words and sketches.
Due to Cool Women BTW - great site for teaching tools - you should have a contest for female students to write the stories you request currently, inspiring so many good thougths and ideas - creating a book for them, and creating pride inside.
We found info that spans from 0000 to almost current outlining the firts for women, achievements etc... With this info and the discussion being had due to Judy and the rest of you, she will write a life of a woman in Canada. Neat huh? I wonder what other gals in her grade across Ontario are doing?

From: London Ontario | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged
April
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posted 04 April 2005 08:13 PM      Profile for April     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I just got it in the mail today! It looks great, and I'll add more soon after I have had time to read and reflect on the work. A glowing article appeared about it in today's Gazette by feminist writer Sue Montgomery, who had nothing but praise for Judy's efforts.
From: Montreal | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged

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