babble home
rabble.ca - news for the rest of us
today's active topics


  
FAQ | Forum Home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» babble   » archived babble   » USA   » Where's Louisiana?

Email this thread to someone!    
Author Topic: Where's Louisiana?
cco
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 8986

posted 02 May 2006 03:01 PM      Profile for cco     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
WASHINGTON - Despite the wall-to-wall coverage of the damage from Hurricane Katrina, nearly one-third of young Americans recently polled couldn't locate Louisiana on a map and nearly half were unable to identify Mississippi.
From: Montréal | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
slimpikins
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 9261

posted 02 May 2006 03:24 PM      Profile for slimpikins     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
This is surprising? Aren't these the same people who still think that Saddam Hussein was the mastermind of 9/11?
From: Alberta | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged
Fear-ah
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6476

posted 02 May 2006 03:42 PM      Profile for Fear-ah        Edit/Delete Post
One can probably do this same trick in any country including Canada...so what does it mean exactly?

I think we can agree that the public school system is a failure and I don't think it's a media responsibility to actually teach people geography--there might have been wall-to-wall coverage, but that doesn't mean people watched it.

But I sincerely doubt that few educated people logging into this forum could necessarily say with any assurance whether it's Colorado or Kansas that borders New Mexico?

I can't...I looked it up ;-)


From: Vancouver | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Sanityatlast
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 12414

posted 02 May 2006 03:58 PM      Profile for Sanityatlast        Edit/Delete Post
True: could most Canadians pick out some of the largest islands in the world: Baffin, Ellesmere, Axel Heidberg, Queen Elizabeth..Devon, etc. all in Canada and some as large as Louisiana? In fact, would they even know some of these were islands?

Prior to 1990 could you pick out Kuwait on a map? Bosnia? am I the only one admitting that I had never hears of Kosovo...Darfur...where exactly is Rwanda, Burundi?

Then again, many Canadians and Americans could 'google' a question and come up with an answer if it was relevent to a particulatr situation.


From: Alberta | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7791

posted 02 May 2006 04:10 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
A friend of mine subscribes to National Geographic, and I used to sub to Canadian Geographic, and both of these publications were generous in including maps with certain issues. My friend gave me his NG maps and atlases so I built up a collection and scanned them evry once in a while so as to be able to answer questions about locale. If my pending mortgage goes through, and there's anything left in my budget, I'll sub to one of the two. They're great magazines, and useful from the point of view of increasing one's knowledge of world geography.

ETA: I did college level courses in both geography and surveying, and considered adding both to my undergraduate program, which was already quite full (I majored in experimental psych and statistics).

[ 02 May 2006: Message edited by: Boom Boom ]


From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Lard Tunderin' Jeezus
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1275

posted 02 May 2006 04:17 PM      Profile for Lard Tunderin' Jeezus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
I think we can agree that the public school system is a failure
I think you've convinced me that your opinions are worthless. The only failure of the public school system I might agree on is....

From: ... | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
GT Snowracer
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 12474

posted 02 May 2006 04:19 PM      Profile for GT Snowracer        Edit/Delete Post
Its like the USA is going back to a that simpler time when all you cared about was local priorities in order.....

Town , County, State, then Country......

It has always been known that those 'Mericans don't know squat about other parts of the world so its of ZERO surprize that so many of them can't tell the difference between Louisiana from their own ass.

As long as their schools are pumping Neo-con faith based BS.... "they ain't gonna know shit"
GT


From: In the echo chamber | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged
Fear-ah
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6476

posted 02 May 2006 06:22 PM      Profile for Fear-ah        Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Lard Tunderin' Jeezus:
I think you've convinced me that your opinions are worthless. The only failure of the public school system I might agree on is....

well that was uncalled for...?

Do you often simply go into forums and attack people for no reason?


From: Vancouver | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
GT Snowracer
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 12474

posted 02 May 2006 06:35 PM      Profile for GT Snowracer        Edit/Delete Post
That was uncalled for.... Jeeez!
GT

From: In the echo chamber | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged
M. Spector
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 8273

posted 02 May 2006 07:36 PM      Profile for M. Spector   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
War is God's way of teaching Americans geography.

- Ambrose Bierce


From: One millihelen: The amount of beauty required to launch one ship. | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7791

posted 02 May 2006 08:39 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I recall public schools did a reasonably good job when I was there, and that was a long time ago. I remember getting good teaching in geography and history as well as all the other stuff, and I have no complaints about the way I was taught other than to say the public school system really did not know how to work with hearing disabled persons such as myself. My family had to hire an after-hours tutor to help me fill in the gaps between what the teachers said and what I heard. My inclination is that things have improved in the public school system for those with disabilities. I remember geography and history were my two favourite subjects for a while, before I gained a deep appreciation for English Lit and composition. Hmmmm... I think I'll start a 'disabilities' thread if we don't have one already.
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
obscurantist
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 8238

posted 02 May 2006 08:48 PM      Profile for obscurantist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Boom Boom:
I think I'll start a 'disabilities' thread if we don't have one already.
Blackadder started this thread a while back, originally on the topic of cerebral palsy, but he expanded it into a discussion of disabilities in general.

[Edit: Oops! I see you just started a new thread. Maybe a fresh start is better anyway, although feel free to include the link to the old thread if you think it'd be helpful.]

[ 02 May 2006: Message edited by: Yossarian ]


From: an unweeded garden | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7791

posted 02 May 2006 08:52 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Originally posted by Yossarian:
[Edit: Oops! I see you just started a new thread. Maybe a fresh start is better anyway, although feel free to include the link to the old thread if you think it'd be helpful.]

That's actually a very good idea - thanks!


From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7791

posted 02 May 2006 09:14 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Back to Geography for a sec - I haven't seen a copy of the National Geographic or Canadian Geographic in a while - are they still worthwhile publications? Anyone here sub to both?
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Sven
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 9972

posted 02 May 2006 09:26 PM      Profile for Sven     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by M. Spector:
War is God's way of teaching Americans geography.

- Ambrose Bierce


I always thought God sucked as a teacher.

IDIOT, n. A member of a large and powerful tribe whose influence in human affairs has always been dominant and controlling. The Idiot's activity is not confined to any special field of thought or action, but "pervades and regulates the whole." He has the last word in everything; his decision is unappealable. He sets the fashions and opinion of taste, dictates the limitations of speech and circumscribes conduct with a dead-line.

- Ambrose Bierce


From: Eleutherophobics of the World...Unite!!!!! | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Radical Progressive
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 12367

posted 02 May 2006 09:47 PM      Profile for Radical Progressive        Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Sven:
..IDIOT, n. ..He has the last word in everything; his decision is unappealable. He sets the fashions and opinion of taste, dictates the limitations of speech ..
..

Sounds pretty much like the babbler moderators...

(Sorry, couldn't resist, please, please don't ban me!)


From: Canada | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged
Lard Tunderin' Jeezus
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1275

posted 03 May 2006 01:24 AM      Profile for Lard Tunderin' Jeezus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Having read a half dozen of your posts, I hope they'll consider it.
From: ... | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Lard Tunderin' Jeezus
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1275

posted 03 May 2006 01:29 AM      Profile for Lard Tunderin' Jeezus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Fear-ah:

well that was uncalled for...?

Do you often simply go into forums and attack people for no reason?


No, I attack when confronted with grotesque and deliberate ignorance. The public school system is already under attack from the radical right, and stupid statements such as yours just encourage them to push privatization and voucher systems.

Really, WTF did you think the reaction would be to your snide disparagement of one of the foundations of social democracy?

[ 03 May 2006: Message edited by: Lard Tunderin' Jeezus ]


From: ... | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
GT Snowracer
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 12474

posted 03 May 2006 11:33 AM      Profile for GT Snowracer        Edit/Delete Post
Jeez..... Can you please tell me your perspective on the current education system in the US.... being a nearly 50 year old person living in toronto.

I did go to school in the states when my parents divorced, and since you haven't been to elementary school since the 60's ... I would hope that you could keep your half assed trolling to a minimum.

We get your angle... YOU HAVE NONE.... now find something to talk about that you actually have some knowledge of.

The radical Right has attacked public schools... and this is what we are talking about... the side effects.

Don't bother replying unless you actually have something based on reality to say regarding this subject.
GT


From: In the echo chamber | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged
Lard Tunderin' Jeezus
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1275

posted 03 May 2006 11:48 AM      Profile for Lard Tunderin' Jeezus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
~ yawn ~
From: ... | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
clersal
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 370

posted 03 May 2006 12:11 PM      Profile for clersal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Back to Geography for a sec - I haven't seen a copy of the National Geographic or Canadian Geographic in a while - are they still worthwhile publications? Anyone here sub to both?

I think that Canadian Geographic is much better than the National.

Photography is great but I am always left with the feeling of very superficial writing. something seems to be missing.
It is not a left wing magazine for sure.


From: Canton Marchand, Québec | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
GT Snowracer
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 12474

posted 03 May 2006 12:11 PM      Profile for GT Snowracer        Edit/Delete Post
Thats right... you have zero to say don't ya....troll
GT

From: In the echo chamber | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged
writer
editor emeritus
Babbler # 2513

posted 03 May 2006 12:14 PM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
GT, could you please stop calling other babblers trolls? If you've got a complaint, send it to the moderators:

michelle@rabble.ca
oldgoat@rabble.ca


From: tentative | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Stargazer
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6061

posted 03 May 2006 12:42 PM      Profile for Stargazer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Wow, another thread gone downhill.

BTW, I am all for the banning of our latest troll Radical Regressive. I think I'll start on that one right away.


From: Inside every cynical person, there is a disappointed idealist. | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
oldgoat
Moderator
Babbler # 1130

posted 03 May 2006 12:44 PM      Profile for oldgoat     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
LTJ, I'm not aware if there's some negative history between you and Fear-ah, so I don't quite get where that came from. I've seen you mix it up a bit with people before, but I've had a clearer understanding of why. This wouldn't have struck me as one of those threads that needs to turn into a dustup.

GT, some sports have some specific rules around dealing with the third man into a fight. You're getting a bit of a name for jumping into marginal situations and making them worse. Cut it out.

edited to add:

quote:
But I sincerely doubt that few educated people logging into this forum could necessarily say with any assurance whether it's Colorado or Kansas that borders New Mexico?


I knew that. I can also name all states that border Canada in order from west to east, but then I don't have much of a social life.

[ 03 May 2006: Message edited by: oldgoat ]


From: The 10th circle | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Radical Progressive
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 12367

posted 03 May 2006 12:48 PM      Profile for Radical Progressive        Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by GT Snowracer:
..that simpler time when all you cared about was local priorities in order.....
Town , County, State, then Country......
..
As long as their schools are pumping Neo-con faith based BS.... "they ain't gonna know shit"

If indeed they did study geography like in those good old simpler times, they might actually know some geography.

Instead, their shools, like ours, are pumping "liberal" BS, not neo-con BS, with the result that their students have some vague notions of Bush causing climate change and recycling saving the world, while rudimentary geographical facts (like the location of Loisiana, name of the the capitol of Wisconsin, highest mountain in Canada etc) are simply not tought.


From: Canada | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged
oldgoat
Moderator
Babbler # 1130

posted 03 May 2006 12:52 PM      Profile for oldgoat     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Uh, Stargazer, *wince* Like writer said, that's:

michelle@rabble.ca
oldgoat@rabble.ca

I like the order that always appears in.


From: The 10th circle | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
oldgoat
Moderator
Babbler # 1130

posted 03 May 2006 12:59 PM      Profile for oldgoat     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Well Radical Progressive, as a parent, school volunteer and once chair of the school community council, (also one who just pays attention) I have to say that's never appeared on my kids curriculum. What has changed since my day is a greater emphasis on analytical skills and the ability to research rather than simple rote memorization and regurgitation. I'm generally proud of our public school system here in Canada. I realise at the same time it's imperfect and will always remain a work in progress.

In my day, in those simpler times, I was taught that all my Protestant friends and neighbours were going to hell. The fact that they were right probably more than 50% of the time hardly justifies teaching that.


From: The 10th circle | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Fear-ah
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6476

posted 03 May 2006 01:42 PM      Profile for Fear-ah        Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by oldgoat:
LTJ, I'm not aware if there's some negative history between you and Fear-ah,


Why would a 'history' be relevent in a open and shut case of a rule violation in this particular thread. It was personal attack.

Now inspite of my call attention to it and then someone else to an obvious violation--you ignored it and then decided to make 'topical' comments to the thread.


quote:
GT, some sports have some specific rules around dealing with the third man into a fight.

Is there a 'negative history' between you and GT? All sports have referees as well? That's you...


quote:
[/QB]I knew that. I can also name all states that border Canada in order from west to east, but then I don't have much of a social life.
[/QB]

Well...that's super.
You are in the 2/3s that got it right as opposed to the elitist contention that a 1/3 of the public must be stupid.
My point was that I think that anyone could probably find themselves in the 'stupid' category if what your testing is some notion of gnosis and the average person without providing a valid reason as to 'why' it is deemed important to KNOW this type of thing.

GT makes a good point--it might be a 'lag' between old pedagogy of 'rote' learning from the old days where memorizing state capitals was deemed important by educators at the time and, well the priorities of globalism and marketing have moved people to consider other things to 'remember'.

Sanityatlast makes a good point that in this technological age, knowledge is contextual and expansive and if asked then it might be more important to measure where people go for the answers, like google.

These are all very good avenues to explore and sure we can discuss whether the public schools are adequate and whether mass education might be served by a different paradigm--but to engage in ad homs for NO reason and then 'post' what should have been the first reply to cover your ass with more ad homs and some vague reference to the picture's inside one's head that has the 'radical right' swooping down humanity is a little much...

And people here claim they do what they do because they are worried about what the 'newbies' might think...pleez


From: Vancouver | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
cco
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 8986

posted 03 May 2006 01:51 PM      Profile for cco     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Radical Progressive:

If indeed they did study geography like in those good old simpler times, they might actually know some geography.

Instead, their shools, like ours, are pumping "liberal" BS, not neo-con BS, with the result that their students have some vague notions of Bush causing climate change and recycling saving the world, while rudimentary geographical facts (like the location of Loisiana, name of the the capitol of Wisconsin, highest mountain in Canada etc) are simply not tought.


You know, I hate to interrupt a good public-school-bashing, but...

I went to public school in the States (born in Louisiana, but mostly went to school in Tennessee). Tennessee is, to put it mildly, not known for the high quality of its schools relative to the rest of the country, and the school I went to was in the inner city and had a 90% black and overwhelmingly poor student population. Nevertheless, I feel that I got a good education, and many people are surprised to hear that I was taught:

1) Geography, including having to name not only all 50 states but also their capitals, in addition to all 95 counties in Tennessee (!)

2) Evolution, with no disclaimers on the textbook or 'intelligent design' bullshit

3) Global warming, including several classroom talks given by local environmental activists

And so on and so forth. People who came out of my high school not knowing where Louisiana is (and I'm sure there were some of them) had only themselves to blame -- it was taught. I suspect it is taught elsewhere in the US, as well.


From: Montréal | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
Radical Progressive
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 12367

posted 03 May 2006 02:29 PM      Profile for Radical Progressive        Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by oldgoat:
Well Radical Progressive, as a parent, school volunteer and once chair of the school community council, (also one who just pays attention) I have to say that's never appeared on my kids curriculum. What has changed since my day is a greater emphasis on analytical skills and the ability to research rather than simple rote memorization and regurgitation. I'm generally proud of our public school system here in Canada. I realise at the same time it's imperfect and will always remain a work in progress.

In my day, in those simpler times, I was taught that all my Protestant friends and neighbours were going to hell. The fact that they were right probably more than 50% of the time hardly justifies teaching that.


Hmmm, during my parents' time in school, papists weren't that popular (i.e. where they grew up). But it wasn't actually taught in school. Was that really the case here?

Btw, hell doesn't exist, so I don't worry too much.

Certainly nothing wrong with analytical skills, it's just that occasionally we seem to forget that one also needs something analyze, i.e. the facts.

There are many good things to say about the Canadian (Ontarian) public school system, but, as you say, it's always a wip.
How about addressing these topics:
- The HS curricula is filled with to many vague and PC type formulations. Should become more concrete and to the point.
- The HS text books are way too thick and, hence, very often not used. Paper handouts are used instead. E.g. a grade 10 math book could (and shuld) be condensed into perhaps 150 pages, not more, with focus on the mathematics. Stick to the core and everybody will be happy.
- Most MS/HS subjects tend to become art projects. E.g. instead of learning Spanish or Science, the students have to make a "project" or a come up with a play. Stick to the core and everybody will be happy.
- World history is not mandatory (but should be).
- Calculus should be offered in grade 10 and be prerequisite to subsequent Science studies.
- Second languages (other than French) should be offered from in all HS grades (9-12). And at least three years of a HS second language should be mandatory for university entrance.
- One year of HS Philosophy (and history of Philosophy) should be mandatory for for university entrance.


From: Canada | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged
ceti
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7851

posted 03 May 2006 02:38 PM      Profile for ceti     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Ok, this is a totally sidetracked thread. Why are we talking about the education system in Ontario, when the topic is about geographic illiteracy in the US, which has enormous consequences? The same poll indicated 63% of American youth 18-24 years old, and 90% of the same could not find Iraq or Afghanistan on a map respectively.

This is not a failure of the school system, but a general societal problem. If after being at war for four years and being bombarded with news and information about the wars every night is not enough to make the shape outlines of countries familiar, then the country is in deeper trouble than I thought.


From: various musings before the revolution | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
Radical Progressive
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 12367

posted 03 May 2006 02:40 PM      Profile for Radical Progressive        Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by cco:
You know, I hate to interrupt a good public-school-bashing, but...

I went to public school in the States (born in Louisiana, but mostly went to school in Tennessee). Tennessee is, to put it mildly, not known for the high quality of its schools relative to the rest of the country, and the school I went to was in the inner city and had a 90% black and overwhelmingly poor student population. Nevertheless, I feel that I got a good education, and many people are surprised to hear that I was taught:

1) Geography, including having to name not only all 50 states but also their capitals, in addition to all 95 counties in Tennessee (!)

2) Evolution, with no disclaimers on the textbook or 'intelligent design' bullshit

3) Global warming, including several classroom talks given by local environmental activists

And so on and so forth. People who came out of my high school not knowing where Louisiana is (and I'm sure there were some of them) had only themselves to blame -- it was taught. I suspect it is taught elsewhere in the US, as well.


Thanks cco.

I must admit that my comment on not teaching basic geography facts was a bit hasty. My kids were also tought e.g. states and state capitols, in a US elementary school. However, my impression of the US public school system is that it starts out well, but then goes downhill after grade 5.
And in Canada, at least in MS/HS, my impression of the Geography curriculum is that it is quite void of basic information but filled with "interpretation & analysis of nothing".
But presumably it differs greatly from school to school, so I don't know if this is generally true.

Btw, I am not bashing public schools. They just could be so much better, for all students, at a an equal or even lower cost.


From: Canada | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged
Fear-ah
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6476

posted 03 May 2006 03:08 PM      Profile for Fear-ah        Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by ceti:
When the topic is about geographic illiteracy in the US, which has enormous consequences?

What are the enormous consequences? This is something you 'think', but why? One can assume that everyone in FEMA, NOLA, US Army Engineers, the ChimpHouse, know where LA is? They also know where Iraq is?

Do you not think that maybe this snide classist article is simply an attempt to make the public somehow 'co-conspirators' in a monumental and well-noted critical failure of elites to deal with a disaster like Hurricane Katrina?


quote:
The same poll indicated 63% of American youth 18-24 years old, and 90% of the same could not find Iraq or Afghanistan on a map respectively.

This is not a failure of the school system, but a general societal problem?


um...further my first point? Why are you indicting society for 'not remembering' something that ONLY the surveyors think is important, but clearly show that it's really only 18-24 year olds couldn't find it on a map?

Where precisely would an 18-24 year old likely to GET this information if not public school? They are not likely to draw enough 'knowledge and experience' yet to presuppose that 'other' resources like media have re-inforced this 'fact'.

I more or less said, largely because this bogus crap is a 'hot' topic on forums allover the Net, especially among rightwing sites, that the article has no merit by any standards. The reference points are not well defended. No attempt at a baseline measure in the research design. It is not really scientific as it merely apes methodologies gleaned from 'marketing focus groups' to make a reactionary point.

Now if people HERE are taking this 'propaganda' seriously then the pitfall is that it's the public school that is actually being indicted, not the media.

Why do I know this--well I read the article and found this:

    Planned is a five-year, multimedia campaign called My Wonderful World that will target children 8 to 17. The goal is to motivate parents and educators to expand geographic offerings in school, at home and in their communities.

Inference? The old school rightwing National Geographic thinks the schools are NOT doing a good enough job and they are willing to help out?

Why do they come to this conclusion? Money... National Geographic wants more of it's vast archives liscensed to schools; it wants royalities for it's materials.

How is NG going about doing this? Inventing a argument that there is a geography 'gap' according to ITS BS survey...

It's the article suggesting there must be failure in the public school system and this 'ad dressed up as news' for National Geographic is part of their marketing strategy.

jeez...

[ 03 May 2006: Message edited by: Fear-ah ]


From: Vancouver | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
ceti
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7851

posted 04 May 2006 12:08 PM      Profile for ceti     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
"Where precisely would an 18-24 year old likely to GET this information if not public school?"

What?? How much TV do kids watch, and how much news are they exposed to? How much to do they read?

This is not classist at all, but cuts across the entire society that has traditionally been self-absorbed and narcissistic to the point that the outside world doesn't matter. This is very well reflected in the popular culture.

Just because you have some weird complex about geography doesn't mean kids should not know more about the world. Geographic education is vital to this.

And the public is complicit, as much as they are indifferent or actively supportive of their own power elites. It is an easy thing to say to give the public a free pass on this, but they are not just completely passive receptacles of propaganda, but also active agents in its consumption.


From: various musings before the revolution | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
ceti
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7851

posted 04 May 2006 12:11 PM      Profile for ceti     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
And to add, its not at all a problem with public schools, but how much worth society puts on these subjects.

If students were taught from childhood to value education, as opposed to conspicuous consumption and vapid celebrity culture, then things would be a lot different. This isn't something the schools can fix.


From: various musings before the revolution | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged

All times are Pacific Time  

   Close Topic    Move Topic    Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
Hop To:

Contact Us | rabble.ca | Policy Statement

Copyright 2001-2008 rabble.ca