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Author Topic: Schiavo family marks her anniversary death
Andy (Andrew)
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posted 01 April 2006 12:51 PM      Profile for Andy (Andrew)   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Both sides are getting in on this.

Her husband who allegedly wanted to let her rest in peace has written a tell-all book as well.


From: Alberta | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged
fern hill
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posted 01 April 2006 12:58 PM      Profile for fern hill        Edit/Delete Post
Aw, jeez, not this again. Hands up anyone who gives a flying fuck.
From: away | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 01 April 2006 01:09 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
But the foundation, which also will have a separate lobbying organization, will seek to have feeding tubes classified as ordinary care for hospital patients ...

While I empathize deeply with everyone who has ever found him/herself in this or a similar situation, I am compelled to say that that is an evil goal if it is conceived of as care that cannot be refused.

Some doctors already try introducing the procedure to families that way. I know. I've been there.

Other doctors know that there are new studies about demonstrating that feeding tubes have next to no role in extending life (although they are of course invaluable as short-term measures in other situations). And if you meet a good doctor, as I did, she will tell you that.

I didn't know that Michael Schiavo had written a book, but will look for references to it. Last summer Joan Didion wrote an interesting article in the New York Review of Books on this story that gave me pause. When I read it over carefully, I would say that she was not so much taking sides in the debate as challenging the (what should we call it? liberal?) consensus that there was no debate to be had. While I think that she was right in purely intellectual terms, I can also see that she was driven to the subject by her own family commitments at the time (her daughter, who died last August, was fighting for life at the time) - as, of course, was I.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Andy (Andrew)
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posted 01 April 2006 01:16 PM      Profile for Andy (Andrew)   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Yes, Skdadl he wrote a book as he felt he needed to explain the end of life decisions he made as well as to respond to criticism that he didn't allow her family to be at her bedside, excluded them from the funeral, and delayed by months informing them of the location of her remains.

Fern Hill the thread was clearly marked. You could just ignore the thread.


From: Alberta | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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Babbler # 478

posted 01 April 2006 01:25 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
For anyone who is interested, here is Didion's article from last June, "The Case of Theresa Schiavo," NYRB 52, no. 10 (9 June 2005).

In the 11 August issue (no. 13), Didion replied to two sets of doctors who had criticized her article. I must say, the more I read her over, the more she shakes up some of my own assumptions. (The exchange of letters is not, unfortunately, online.)


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
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posted 01 April 2006 01:50 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Just this morning, my mum reminded me of her living will (NO medical heroics etc). My mum is in reasonably good health, but she is 93 years old.

Teresa Schiavo was dead for all intents and purposes long before they pulled the plug and stopped feeding.

And fern has every right to comment on this. I too feel it is a macabre story dragged up by the pro-life contingent.


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Screaming Lord Byron
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posted 01 April 2006 02:00 PM      Profile for Screaming Lord Byron     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I was rather hoping we'd never hear Terri Schiavo's name again. I really, really wish people could let go of issues like this, particularly when they become history, as this has. All that they become afterwards is vicious wedge issues.

Besides, the link is to the Moonie Times. I wouldn't even trust the mailing address of that newspaper if I couldn't get it independently verified.


From: Calgary | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 01 April 2006 02:05 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Well, my link is certainly not to the Moonie Times; and furthermore, my experience with doctors who want to treat new procedures as just something more in their toolkits is not from the Moonie Times.

So maybe there are things people don't want to think about. What can I say? Have a nice trip?


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Wee Mousie
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posted 01 April 2006 02:56 PM      Profile for Wee Mousie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Screaming Lord Byron:
I was rather hoping we'd never hear Terri Schiavo's name again. . .

That should have been a reasonable expectation once the autopsy results were pubished last June.

quote:
No trauma before Schiavo collapse
Wednesday, 15 June, 2005
BBC News

An autopsy report on a brain-damaged woman at the centre of a long legal battle in the US has shown that she suffered no trauma before her collapse.

Terri Schiavo's parents had accused her husband of abusing her before the collapse in 1990, but Michael Schiavo denied the claim. . .

. . . The report also said her brain was only half its normal size at her death.

She was incapable of surviving without her feeding tube, Mr Throgmartin said, adding that she was blind and incapable of thinking, feeling or interacting with her environment.

"This damage was irreversible, and no amount of therapy or treatment would have regenerated the massive loss of neurons," he said. . .


Still, the fundies' consternation is understandable. The description of the condition of Schiavo's brain, at the time of her autopsy, is not too dissimilar to that of most fundies' mental equipment.

[ 01 April 2006: Message edited by: Wee Mousie ]


From: Mouse Hole | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged
Screaming Lord Byron
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posted 01 April 2006 03:15 PM      Profile for Screaming Lord Byron     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by skdadl:
Well, my link is certainly not to the Moonie Times; and furthermore, my experience with doctors who want to treat new procedures as just something more in their toolkits is not from the Moonie Times.

So maybe there are things people don't want to think about. What can I say? Have a nice trip?


Sorry, Skdadl - I was refering to Andy's link, not yours.


From: Calgary | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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Babbler # 478

posted 01 April 2006 03:24 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
'Sokay, SLB.

I don't mean to sound harsh; however, I think that some of the trust expressed here in things like living wills and no heroic measures is where the more dangerous naïveté lies, simply because end-of-life situations are seldom as clean-cut as a lot of people seem to wish they would be.

Sometimes they are, but mostly they are not, and the doctors keep throwing new curves at us. It would be better for people to be realistic and to learn as much as possible rather than just to go on hoping that the choices will be predictable and simple and clear, or even legal. We all need to be on our guard, and to learn as much as we can.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Pogo
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posted 01 April 2006 05:25 PM      Profile for Pogo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I agree with Skdadl. My father-in-law passed away last fall and it was not a simple thing. Sometimes we fought with doctors to provide more care, sometimes we prompted them to withdraw interventions. No one likes to talk about the dying process, but it is a complex discussion that needs to be sorted out.

In Fern Hill's defense, the Schiavo case is surrounded with such rhetoric that it obscures the issues.


From: Richmond BC | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged

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