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Author Topic: Canadian media bias on Afghanistan
M. Spector
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posted 02 January 2007 10:40 PM      Profile for M. Spector   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
This article examines several recent instances of NATO forces killing Afghan civilians - all of which occurred well after the close of Operation Medusa - and the coverage which those events were given by our country's agenda-setting English newspapers: the Toronto Star and the Globe and Mail.

From: One millihelen: The amount of beauty required to launch one ship. | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
M. Spector
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posted 02 January 2007 11:04 PM      Profile for M. Spector   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Three Big Lies About Afghanistan:
quote:
The public is getting distorted news from Afghanistan because the North American media has substituted jingoism and flag-waving for reporting of hard news.

Afghanistan’s complexity and lethal tribal politics have been marketed to the public by government and media as a selfless crusade to defeat the `terrorist’ Taliban, implant democracy, and liberate Afghan women. Afghanistan is part of the `world-wide struggle against terrorism,’ we are told.

None of this is true.


Eric Margolis

From: One millihelen: The amount of beauty required to launch one ship. | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
M. Spector
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posted 02 January 2007 11:07 PM      Profile for M. Spector   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Canada in Afghanistan: Top Ten Under-reported Facts
quote:
FACT #1: Jean Chretien & Canadian Corporations Involved in Trans-Afghan Pipeline
FACT #2: Gordon O'Connor, Defence Minister, Is Former Military Lobbyist
FACT #3: Current Afghan Parliament Includes Warlords and Drug Lords
FACT #4: Afghan Warlords Considered Bigger Threat Than Taliban
FACT #5: Afghan Women Face Repression Despite Removal Of Taliban
FACT #6: Elected Afghan Woman Faces Death Threats For Speaking Out
FACT #7: Since the U.S.-led War, Afghanistan Is Increasingly Hooked on Heroin
FACT #8: U.S. And Coalition Forces Using Excessive Force & Arbitrary Detention
FACT #9: Canada Complicit In Violation of Human Rights For 'War On Terror'
FACT #10: U.S. Finds More Oil and Gas Reserves After 4-Year Search

From: One millihelen: The amount of beauty required to launch one ship. | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
M. Spector
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posted 02 January 2007 11:16 PM      Profile for M. Spector   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Peter Mansbridge boosts Canada in Afghanistan
October 5, 2006
by Derrick O'Keefe
quote:
Last year, in March 2005, before Maclean's had completely morphed into a glossy weekly version of the repugnant National Post, the CBC's Peter Mansbridge wrote an opinion piece in the magazine entitled, "Maybe Bush was right: Even U.S. critics agree that the Iraq invasion may have sparked democracy" (March 11, 2005).

The soothing authoritative voice of Canada's public broadcaster laid out an unlikely analogy, suggesting potential parallels between the impact of the 1989 fall of the Berlin Wall and the events initiated by recent U.S. policy in the Middle East and the 2003 launching of the war on Iraq. Citing Afghanistan, Iraq (then enjoying something like relative stability following January 2005 elections), a "hint" of democratic reform in Egypt and Saudi Arabia and "remarkable scenes" in Lebanon, Mansbridge clearly implied he thought Bush was on his way to making a decent omelet, and that the broken eggs (and lives) of the Iraq war just might have been worth it.


See also this thread: The CBC's creepy obsession with the military.

[ 05 January 2008: Message edited by: M. Spector ]


From: One millihelen: The amount of beauty required to launch one ship. | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
M. Spector
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posted 21 February 2007 09:22 AM      Profile for M. Spector   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Amnesty International and the BC Civil Liberties Association announced today that they are petitioning the Federal Court to stop the Canadian Forces from handing over detainees in Afghanistan to the Afghan authorities, "or any other state that is likely to torture them, including the United States."

The media reports on this, however, have failed to pick up on the reference to the US as a torture state. Either that, or it is a deliberate decision to de-emphasize it.

All the media reports on the web so far make it sound as if the sole concern is with Afghanistan's reputation for torturing detainees.

Globe and Mail

Vancouver Sun (Canadian Press)

CBC

CFRA


From: One millihelen: The amount of beauty required to launch one ship. | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
jeff house
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posted 21 February 2007 01:09 PM      Profile for jeff house     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
My client Chris Teske was in Afghanistan on two tours of duty, winning numerous honours before coming to Canada and seeking refugee status here.

He was himself ordered to beat hooded and bound prisoners with an ax handle to "soften them up" for interrogation.

He is speaking tonight at

Soldiers' Stories: Resisting War From Iraq To Afghanistan Panel discussion with U.S. war resisters Chris and Stephanie Teske, and journalist Trish Wood. 7 pm. Free. Eastminster United Church, 310 Danforth. te4peace@yahoo.ca.

[ 21 February 2007: Message edited by: jeff house ]


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Village Idiot
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posted 21 February 2007 02:43 PM      Profile for Village Idiot   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I wonder if this is some sort of backlash for Canada's decision to pull some embedded reporters out last April due to complaints from the US and Aussies?


http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200612/s1819811.htm


"Documents released today have confirmed a number of journalists embedded with Canadian troops in Afghanistan were removed on short notice after complaints from other nations including the United States and Australia.

According to the documents, several of Canada's allies had complained the country's policy on embedded journalists was too liberal.

A Canadian Defence Department source has confirmed Australia was one of the nations that did the most complaining.

The actual incident occurred in April, when four journalists were removed from their embedded positions after very short notice.

In at least one case, a helicopter was sent in during fighting to remove the reporter.

The Canadian Defence Department says the allies considered the country's policy overly-progressive and risky.

It also says placating allies will always triumph over the media embed program."


I didn't say it was a STRONG theory.


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siren
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posted 21 February 2007 03:22 PM      Profile for siren     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by M. Spector:
Three Big Lies About Afghanistan: Eric Margolis

That is an excellent summation of Taliban history. Not to detract from Margolis, but I wonder when he has recently returned to Afghanistan.


I wish I felt for one minute that Hillier knew even this much about Afghanistan. Or Harper for that matter.


From: Of course we could have world peace! But where would be the profit in that? | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
M. Spector
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posted 21 February 2007 03:23 PM      Profile for M. Spector   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
OK, I've read that article three times and I still have no idea why the Aussies objected to the Canadian journalists.

Nor do I understand who is supposedly doing the "lashing back" - the journalists?

[ 21 February 2007: Message edited by: M. Spector ]


From: One millihelen: The amount of beauty required to launch one ship. | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
remind
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posted 21 February 2007 03:25 PM      Profile for remind     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Haven't heard any of them report on this in any great depth:

Countering the Insurgency in Afghanistan: Losing Friends and Making Enemies

quote:
The International Community needs a reality check: we must fundamentally reassess
the status of international community counter-insurgency efforts in Afghanistan

The international community has failed to convince the local population that it is there to
help and has failed to increase support for the Afghan government.

This has reinforced a situation in which the local Afghan population sees itself as being
alone, faced on the one hand, by the international community and the government, and on the other hand by the Taliban and other insurgent groups.

The support that the international community enjoyed when it first arrived in the country
has disappeared and must be rebuilt in order to provide a positive environment for the
military to fight in and to build support for the Karzai Government in Southern Afghanistan.



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siren
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posted 21 February 2007 03:31 PM      Profile for siren     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
remind, I know you have a link for that story.
From: Of course we could have world peace! But where would be the profit in that? | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
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posted 21 February 2007 04:11 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'd like to know exactly at what point the "former" imperial powers of Europe became the "international community."
From: Out from under the bridge and out for a stroll | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Fidel
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posted 21 February 2007 04:45 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Eric Margolis said:

quote:
Taliban was a religious, anti-communist movement that drew its power from Afghanistan Pushtun( or Pathan) ethnic majority, the world largest tribal group(Kurds are the second largest).

Most of Taliban energies were spent battling the remaining Afghan communists, united with various Tajik groups under the banner of the Northern Alliance, whose leader, ad Shah Massoud, was a long-time Soviet KGB collaborator, its military chief, Gen. Fahim, the former director of the notorious Afghan secret police which executed and horribly tortured tens of thousands of victims.


Sure. And Margolis neglects to mention that Massoud, "the Lion of Panjir", is still considered a national hero in Afghanistan. In fact, the North Alliance (United Islamic Front for the Salvation of Afghanistan) with Massoud once enjoyed wide-spread support, from mujahideen leaders in Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, to support in Russia, Iran, India, and China. The CIA cut Massoud's funding in 1992 when Massoud declared war on the Taliban. The American ambassador once suggest that Massoud simply surrender to the Taliban.

And one other thing Margolis neglects to mention in his bitty, the Taliban were spawned by the CIA during "The Company's", Saudi, and British efforts toward Talibanization of Pakistan and Afghanistan in the 1980's and costing American taxpayers billions of dollars annually. CIA operation Cyclone was more expensive than funding of right-wing death squads in Latin America during the Reagan years.

ETA: Everyone knows Margolis is a rabid anti-communist. It's not difficult to understand that from reading his half-truth commentaries. He only half-heartedly praised Cuba recently in a story ripping down the Bushites. I suppose even conservatives need to appear unbiased every now and then.

[ 21 February 2007: Message edited by: Fidel ]


From: Viva La Revolución | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
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posted 21 February 2007 05:15 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I don't think Margolis is consumed with the need to establish that all things resolve to CIA plots in the same manner as you are, and is actually interested in other things, as well, and doesn't necessarily feel the need to litter his writing with facts that point in that direction, even though he is quite well aware of them.

He is a well studied student of the Afghan situation, and its history and there is no indication that he is an imbecile, either, so rather than wishing that everyone should present history in the fashion which is suitable to the political position you wish to promote, you might try and read him, and critique for what he has said, not for the things you wish he had said.


From: Out from under the bridge and out for a stroll | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Fidel
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posted 21 February 2007 05:19 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
okay, so I'm sworn to not reading either Margolis' or Cueball's half-baked commentary for anykind of understanding Afghanistan's tragic history of the latter half of last century to now. At least I'm honest and didn't leave any truths out.

quote:
Originally posted by Cueball:
I don't think Margolis is consumed with the need to establish that all things resolve to CIA plots in the same manner as you are

That's right, Margolis is only interested in smearing the name of a national hero of Afghanistan by linking him with some sort of spooky KGB plot.

[ 21 February 2007: Message edited by: Fidel ]


From: Viva La Revolución | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
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posted 21 February 2007 05:31 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It is impossible to write history and to not leave truths out. That is simply an effect of trying to be readable. As for Massoud being "lionized" in Afghanistan, in a general sense, this statement is clearly either insane or just ignorant, as there is no way that the leader of a minority faction in Northern Alliance could possibly be generally popular throughout Afghanistan, in particular as he was at war with the army of the Pashtu people, whom are the largest ethnicity in the country. At least Margolis is capable of distancing himself from wishful thinking, to the point where is capable of a relatively coherent presentation of the facts that he does reproduce in his analysis, even though he doesn't attempt to present every single relevant detail of the history of Afghanistan from the time of Alexander the Great to the present in every single piece he writes.
From: Out from under the bridge and out for a stroll | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Fidel
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posted 21 February 2007 05:34 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
And I knew you were full of it when you tried to tell me that the corrupt Shah of Iran had wonderful plans to build infrastructure in Afghanistan about a year or so before Iranians chased him out of that country to the U.S. and absconding with billions in oil revenues.
From: Viva La Revolución | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
Frustrated Mess
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posted 21 February 2007 05:37 PM      Profile for Frustrated Mess   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
And I knew you were full of it when you tried to tell me that the corrupt Shah of Iran had wonderful plans to build infrastructure in Afghanistan

What is difficult to accept about that? Both cold war powers coveted the strategic position of Afghanistan and it would only make sense to have the Iranians cultivate a relationship with the Afghanis on behalf of their US sponsor.

From: doom without the gloom | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
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posted 21 February 2007 05:46 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I never said any such thing. You spent quite a long time trying to assert that I said that through logic heavily dependent on the idea that I must be saying "a" if I refused to agree with you about "b." No matter! This is par for the course with you. As I remember it, all I said was that the fact that plans failed to materialize in the period of a year did not prove that there was no intention to actually create such infrastructure, especially as there was a pro-communist coupe in the intervening period, as I recall.

What I really wish is that you would stop obsessively using weak modifying adjectives, such "corrupt" as a means of asserting an a priori moral value complete with each statement, and thus front end loading your prose with valueless moralistic crap, -- it merely undermines whatever value there is in what you are saying.

Besides it make you sound like back issues of Pravda, circa 1982.

[ 21 February 2007: Message edited by: Cueball ]


From: Out from under the bridge and out for a stroll | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Fidel
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posted 21 February 2007 05:54 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Frustrated Mess:

What is difficult to accept about that? Both cold war powers coveted the strategic position of Afghanistan and it would only make sense to have the Iranians cultivate a relationship with the Afghanis on behalf of their US sponsor.

Well it's proof that the one cold war power was over-stepping its bounds in a quest for world domination. Can you imagine the shit-fan consequences if the Soviets had have been arming the Sandinistas, Salvadoran rebels, or socialists in Chile leading up to the CIA's coup d'etat against South America's first democratically-elected socialist government ?.

The point is the Shah was a corrupt tyrant and one of 36 or more brutal right-wing dictators supported by the USA in the last century.

Even better than Eric Margolis rabid anti-communist ravings on the matter, check out this Berkeley interview with someone who knows about the period of Talibanization of Pakistan under General Zia and his CIA-backed illegit militia government during the 1980's.

Berkeley Interview with Khaled Ahmed, a then Pakistani Press news editor


From: Viva La Revolución | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
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posted 21 February 2007 06:01 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
As if the fact that the Shah was "corrupt" proves that he had no intention of fulfilling his commitment in a general sense, since, as FM has adroitly pointed out, building "infrastructure" can often be a means of furthering corrupt aims -- another pertinent example of this being the Soviet road built to connect Uzbek SSR with Kabul, useful as a means of invasion, among other things.
From: Out from under the bridge and out for a stroll | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Frustrated Mess
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posted 21 February 2007 06:06 PM      Profile for Frustrated Mess   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Can you imagine the shit-fan consequences if the Soviets had have been arming the Sandinistas, Salvadoran rebels, or socialists in Chile leading up to the CIA's coup d'etat against South America's first democratically-elected socialist government ?.

As I recall, Cuban and Soviet influences were cited by US political and military ideologues in supporting the "shit-fan consequences" that befell the people of Latin America. In fact, wasn't there a thing called the Iran-Contra scandal?

From: doom without the gloom | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
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posted 21 February 2007 06:11 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It is hard to imagine Che Guevara's little stunt in Bolivia being characterized as anything short of interventionism, were the tables set the other way around.
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Fidel
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posted 21 February 2007 06:14 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Frustrated Mess:

As I recall, Cuban and Soviet influences were cited by US political and military ideologues in supporting the "shit-fan consequences" that befell the people of Latin America. In fact, wasn't there a thing called the Iran-Contra scandal?

Cuba was a separate and distinct target of U.S. imperialism. The revolution got rid of the U.S.-backed mafia regime, and the CIA and Cuban exiles have waged a propaganda and terrorist war against their "beloved" people and homeland ever since. The missiles were put in place because the Soviets were feeling a bit threatened with American missiles trained at Moscow from Turkey and several other strategic locations. Dr Strangelove and all that. The Cubans felt that the Yanqui imperialists would try to pull Bay of Pigs part deux.

The Shah was an asshole, and Iranians can thank the west for the Ayatollah. The Dulles brothers meddling in Iranian democracy in the 50's worked out well in repressing a nation's desire for social democracy. Social democracy is what every person around the world wants, not unrealistic consumer-driven capitalism with three cars and a mansion. Christ, there are tens of millions of Americans who can only dream of the American dream themselves.

[ 21 February 2007: Message edited by: Fidel ]


From: Viva La Revolución | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
Fidel
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posted 21 February 2007 06:31 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Cueball:
As if the fact that the Shah was "corrupt" proves that he had no intention of fulfilling his commitment in a general sense,

Sure, if you would be as naive to trust someone whose secret police beat and tortured thousands to death and absconded with billions of dollars in Iranian oil revenues after he'd gone too far in his own country. The Yanquis and Wall Street welcomed him and his billions, stolen from the Iranian people. I think his intentions and personal word were worthless.

quote:
another pertinent example of this being the Soviet road built to connect Uzbek SSR with Kabul, useful as a means of invasion, among other things.

One Afghani living in Canada returned to Kabul recently for the first time since fleeing in 1989. He said there more traffic lights during PDPA rule, and that Kabul is a shambles now. He didn't recognize it. And I don't imagine why that was so after CIA-backed thugs and warlords continued destroying the country after 1992.

The Russkies have finished a several thousand kilometre extension of the trans-Siberian railway to facilitate trade with the Koreas. North Korea's economy is booming. I think if Yanquis imperialists would get the hell out of Korea once and for all, the Korea's would unite, and the Asian tiger economies would really prosper. The Yanquis imperialists don't want that though and prefer to remain a destabilizing presence menacing the region.


From: Viva La Revolución | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
M. Spector
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posted 01 March 2007 08:50 PM      Profile for M. Spector   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
[C]an we really have a fair Afghanistan debate when so many of the sources we rely on for info are bankrolled by the Department of National Defence (DND)?

....a disproportionate number of those quoted by the media or penning op-eds on foreign affairs hail from the 14 defence, international studies and military history programs across the country receiving DND dole-outs.

Peter Langille, a University of Western Ontario professor specializing in conflict resolution, has a word for the scholarly recipients of such funds: "embedded." He's critical of the federal department's $2.5 million yearly Security and Defence Forum (SDF) program, which shells out for research.

"It has a near monopoly over discussion and programs not only of defence issues, but also IR [international relations studies] within Canadian academe," he says, referring to the prevalence of a paradigm inclined toward a long war policy and expansion of the military sector.
....

Things are certainly lusher at the SDF-supported Centre for Military and Strategic Studies at the University of Calgary, headed by the oft-quoted David Bercuson, who champions a stronger defence sector and a sustained war against the Taliban. The last 18 months, he admits, have been good ones for advocates of military preparedness. "I'd like to think that we have had some impact on government thinking, both the previous government's and the current one's," he says.

It's the same sense of satisfaction expressed by Queen's University's Doug Bland, chair of the DND-financed defence management studies program. He helped edit Canada Without Armed Forces?, which was instrumental in a $12.8 billion bump in military expenditures over the next five years in the 2005 federal budget.

Have proponents of a stronger military been able to set the tone?, I ask him. "Oh, absolutely," says Bland, "in fact, I just got off the phone for an hour with somebody from CanWest News. The media come to us almost all the time looking for background."


NOW magazine


From: One millihelen: The amount of beauty required to launch one ship. | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
M. Spector
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posted 14 March 2007 11:12 AM      Profile for M. Spector   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Canadian entertainers whoring for the war effort
quote:
There's a different kind of comedy special airing on CBC tonight.

Stand Up in Kandahar (CBC, 8 p.m.) was shot on location at Kandahar Air Field, home to 2,500 Canadian men and women serving in Canada's mission in Afghanistan. It's a kind of This Hour Has 22 Minutes on-the-road special, hosted by Shaun Majumder, and featuring Mark Critch and 22 Minutes writer Irwin Barker. Also along are veteran stand-up performers Tim Nutt and Erica Sigurdson....

Near the end, Majumder says to the troops, "We're going to take a very positive message back, for what you guys are doing for us here." The point is that the comedians bond with the troops, and by airing it, CBC asks us to bond with the comedians, the troops and the whole darn package. It's a fascinating phenomenon.



From: One millihelen: The amount of beauty required to launch one ship. | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Red T-shirt
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posted 14 March 2007 12:35 PM      Profile for Red T-shirt     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Re. Majumber's quote to Cdn. soldiers in Afghanistan about taking back a positive message "for what you guys are doing for us here". Does he mean supporting a very corrupt regime headed up by an American pupit and backed by his merry band of warlords and druglords or is he referring to killing innocent Afghans on a fairly regular basis?
Perhaps he was just referring to handing over all detainees to an Afghan governement that is widely condemned for using torture and having absolutely no oversight into what happens to those people once they are offloaded.

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contrarianna
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posted 15 March 2007 10:34 AM      Profile for contrarianna     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by M. Spector:
Canadian entertainers whoring for the war effort

OK, everybody channel Bob Hope in Vietnam--group hug--oooo is that a frag grenade or are you just happy to see me.

From: here to inanity | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 15 March 2007 11:20 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I was hoping to watch CBC's "Little Mosque..." last night, but it was bounced by "Stand Up in Afganistan", which was just boring. Finally switched to a movie after fifteen minutes.
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
M. Spector
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posted 15 March 2007 07:19 PM      Profile for M. Spector   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Um, it wasn't bounced. The season is over.
From: One millihelen: The amount of beauty required to launch one ship. | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
M. Spector
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posted 03 April 2007 08:51 AM      Profile for M. Spector   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by M. Spector:
Canadian entertainers whoring for the war effort
John Doyle's column today talks about how Canadian "satire" is too respectful of authority.

He refers to the Stand Up In Kandahar show that I was on about before:

quote:
Our troops are entitled to be entertained and entitled to our best wishes for their safety. But comedians who do the entertaining are entering into a pact with the current government and the military establishment. That allows little room for a truly authentic contrarian view on a great many issues.

From: One millihelen: The amount of beauty required to launch one ship. | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
unionist
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posted 03 April 2007 09:15 AM      Profile for unionist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by M. Spector:
John Doyle's column today talks about how Canadian "satire" is too respectful of authority.

His point seems obvious once you think about it, but he's right. Canadian satire (at least the TV variety) is pretty safe and tame.


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M. Spector
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posted 13 July 2008 08:01 PM      Profile for M. Spector   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Still selling the war to Canadians.

Sandie Rinaldo actually said this on CTV News tonight:

quote:
There are new signs the global war on terror is turning, and Canada's military mission is becoming ever more important. Violence is decreasing in Iraq and raging in Afghanistan.

Now there is word the Pentagon is considering a critical redeployment of US troops.

As CTV's Joy Malbon reports, for American and Canadian soldiers the move can't come soon enough.


Could it be any more blatant?

From: One millihelen: The amount of beauty required to launch one ship. | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
George Victor
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posted 14 July 2008 03:18 AM      Profile for George Victor        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Globe and Mail's Graeme Smith certainly isn't selling the war to Canadians.

In fact, if you are not reading him, you really don't know what is happening there because you don't have the Afghan take on it.

Today, reporting from Kandahar, "a roomful of Afghan businessmen laughed raucously when informed that the Canadian military believes the city has returned to normal.

"If things are okay here, why are the soldiers scared?" said Mohammed Naseem.

"People who can afford to leave have evacuated, Mr.Naseem said. He has relocated his family to Dubai, and he says he only feels free to speak critically about what's happening in Kandahar because they are safely out of the country.

"There is panic now in Kandahar. Everybody is wondering what will happen next."

[ 14 July 2008: Message edited by: George Victor ]


From: Cambridge, ON | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged
George Victor
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posted 17 July 2008 04:37 AM      Profile for George Victor        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Or perhaps the Globe is suspect, running those business pages and all?

But Graeme is as honest as, as ...Rory Stewart (The Places in Between). And yet, Rory was asked by Charles to tutor the princelings one summer wasn't he...


From: Cambridge, ON | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged
George Victor
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posted 25 July 2008 07:32 AM      Profile for George Victor        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Nada?
From: Cambridge, ON | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged
contrarianna
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posted 25 July 2008 12:09 PM      Profile for contrarianna     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Graeme Smith is a good reporter and has garnered deserved awards--while lending prestige to the Globe. But his reportage of the hurly burly of Afghanistan with its lowered expectations of Canada's "mission" there (lowered expectations the Harper government is now also strategically putting forward) takes a backseat to the meta-commentary in the Globe which has pushed for Canada's entry and continued presence there.
From: here to inanity | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged
jeff house
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posted 25 July 2008 01:45 PM      Profile for jeff house     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Meanwhile, even Zbigniew Brzezinski says Afghanistan is a quagmire:

quote:
"I think we're literally running the risk of unintentionally doing what the Russians did. And that, if it happens, would be a tragedy," Brzezinski told the Huffington Post on Friday. "When we first went into Afghanistan to overthrow the Taliban, we were actually welcomed by an overwhelming majority of Afghans. They did not see us as invaders, as they saw the Soviets."

However, Brzezinski noted that just as the Soviets were able to delude themselves that they had a loyal army of communist-sympathizers who would transform the country, the U.S.-led forces may now be making similar mistakes. He said that the conduct of military operations "with little regard for civilian casualties" may accelerate the negative trend in local public opinion regarding the West's role. "It's just beginning, but it's significant," Brzezinski said.


Surely our journalists will want to cover that.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/07/25/brzezinski-warns-against_n_114999.html


From: toronto | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Fidel
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posted 25 July 2008 03:54 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
War Profiteering from Vietnam to Iraq

VietNam was a huge success for upside-down socialists. It's not whether they win or lose but how many billions of dollars U.S. taxpayers can be soaked for. Social programs for everyone but the poor.

[ 25 July 2008: Message edited by: Fidel ]


From: Viva La Revolución | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
M. Spector
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posted 30 September 2008 09:56 PM      Profile for M. Spector   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Silence on Afghan media repression
quote:
It is instructive to look at our media's performance when favoured states like Karzai's Afghanistan commit injustices.

From: One millihelen: The amount of beauty required to launch one ship. | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Fidel
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posted 01 October 2008 06:48 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by M. Spector:
Silence on Afghan media repression

They've attained their ultimate levels of incompetence. They're much better at reporting election campaign dropouts and over-analyzing human interest stories American-style about the Conservative small business owner who almost sold a pack of gum last week than the coincidental stuff tied directly to the stoogeocracy in Ottawa. Dumbin' us down American style they is.


From: Viva La Revolución | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged

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