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Author Topic: Iraq after 2-22
writer
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posted 23 February 2006 01:27 PM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
President Jalal Talabani called an emergency summit of Iraq's political leaders to discuss the violence.

Sunni Arab politicians boycotted the meeting and pulled out of coalition talks in protest at reprisal attacks.

... In a rare public rebuke, the main Sunni religious authority - the Association of Muslim Scholars - accused Iraq's top Shia cleric, Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, of fomenting the violence.

Scores die amid Iraqi shrine fury



From: tentative | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
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posted 23 February 2006 01:29 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
The Balkanization of the Arab world.
From: Out from under the bridge and out for a stroll | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
writer
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posted 23 February 2006 03:33 PM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Iraq's burning season

Iraq's slow burn of the last six weeks has been occurring behind the backs of most of the western media. The bombing on 22 February of one of Shi'a Islam's holiest shrines, the al-Askari mosque (the "golden mosque") in Samarra, has reignited the world's attention. But how does this latest incident, and the retaliatory attacks it has provoked, fit into the unfolding story of Iraq's conflict and United States strategy for the country?



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Bobolink
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posted 24 February 2006 12:38 PM      Profile for Bobolink   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
Remember that Iraq is an artificial state, much like colonies in Africa, Iraq was cobbled together by the British from pieces of the ruined Ottoman Empire in order to give Prince Feisal of Mecca a kingdom.

Osama bin Ladin, a Wahabbi Muslim considers both Sunnis and Shiites to be apostate and under his theology may be killed at will. So bombing the shrine accomplished two purposes, it causes trouble for the Americans and reduces the numbers of Shiites and Sunnis in the world.

Who wins with the shrine bombing? bin Ladin.

[ 24 February 2006: Message edited by: Bobolink ]


From: Stirling, ON | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
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posted 24 February 2006 12:45 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Bobolink:

Osama bin Ladin, a Wahabbi Muslim considers both Sunnis and Shiites to be apostate and under his theology may be killed at will. So bombing the shrine accomplished two purposes, it causes trouble for the Americans and reduces the numbers of Shiites and Sunnis in the world.

References please.

My understaniding is as follows:

Whahabya is a rude descriptive term used to describe a specific school of Salafist thought, and that Whahabists normally describe themselves as Salafists. Salafism is the state religion of Saudi Arabia and is a brand of Sunni Islam.

In other words OBL can not possibly consider Sunni Muslims Apostate because he is a Sunni Muslim, and the tradition of thought (Whahabya) he comes from is embedded in that tradition.

I also have never read that OBL is recognized as an Imam with a mandate to make religous decrees or Fatwa.

[ 24 February 2006: Message edited by: Cueball ]


From: Out from under the bridge and out for a stroll | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
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posted 24 February 2006 12:51 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Salafi

quote:
A Salafi (Arabic سلفي referring to early Muslim), from the Arabic word Salaf سلف (literally meaning predecessors or early generations), is an adherent of a contemporary movement in Sunni Islam that is sometimes called Salafism or Wahhabism. Salafis themselves insist that their beliefs are simply pure Islam as practiced by the first three generations of Muslims and that they should not be regarded as a sect. Most do not like to be called Wahhabis, although this name was acceptable in the past.


[ 24 February 2006: Message edited by: Cueball ]


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skdadl
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posted 24 February 2006 12:52 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Osama?

It is pretty clear that Zarqawi's group, al-Qaeda in Iraq so-called, is al-Qaeda only for marketing and PR purposes mutually beneficial to Zarqawi and bin Laden. I haven't read anyone trustworthy who thinks bin Laden has any real involvement or influence in Iraq at all.

Where's Osama?


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
leftcoastguy
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posted 24 February 2006 12:55 PM      Profile for leftcoastguy     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Dead!
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Jingles
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posted 24 February 2006 12:57 PM      Profile for Jingles     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Bin Laden? Come on.

Who benefits? The architects of this war, who've been clear the the destruction of the Iraqi state was an objective. They don't want to Balkanize Iraq, they want to Jenin-ize Iraq.


From: At the Delta of the Alpha and the Omega | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
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posted 24 February 2006 01:00 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Where is Emmanuel Goldstein?

quote:
LRB | Vol. 28 No. 1 dated 5 January 2006 | Eliot Weinberger

I heard that most of the insurgent violence in Iraq was personally directed by a Jordanian, Abu Musab al-Zarqawi. I heard that rumours of his presence had led to the US bombings of Fallujah, Ramadi, Mosul, Samarra, and a village in Kurdistan, but each time he had narrowly escaped. I heard that he had been seen recently in Jordan, Syria, Iran and Pakistan. I heard that he was closely linked with Osama bin Laden, Saddam Hussein and the government of Syria. I heard that he was the bitter enemy of bin Laden, the secularist Saddam and the secularist Syrian government. I heard that he had died in Afghanistan. I heard that, after an injury in Afghanistan, his leg had been amputated in a hospital in Iraq, which was proof of Saddam’s connections to terrorism. I heard he was still walking on two legs. I heard he was one of the hooded men in a video showing the decapitation of a young American, Nick Berg, although the men never removed their hoods. I heard that he had died recently in Mosul when eight men blew themselves up rather than surrender to the US forces who had surrounded their house. I heard Sheikh Jawad al-Kalesi, an important Shia cleric in Baghdad, say that Zarqawi had been killed long ago, but the US was using him as a ‘ploy’. I heard the President compare him to Hitler, Stalin and Pol Pot. I heard that he had fewer than a hundred followers in Iraq.

I heard that there could be as many as a hundred groups responsible for the suicide bombings and I heard that many of them were connected to Ansar al-Islam, which had many more followers in Iraq than Zarqawi and had actual ties to Osama bin Laden before the war. Ansar al-Islam was almost never mentioned in administration speeches or in the press, since it is a Kurdish group, and all Kurds are presumed to be allies of the US.


Courtesy of Lance

[ 24 February 2006: Message edited by: Cueball ]


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skdadl
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posted 24 February 2006 01:01 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Read writer's second link. Great report.

People here really have been underestimating the insurgents. Interesting to learn as well of the strength of the Shia insurgency.

I don't think this is benefiting the Americans at all. The great question is how they hang on now, given the chaos they have created. I don't see how they can hang on; and yet I don't see how they can leave.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
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posted 24 February 2006 01:07 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Actually, if I were going to pin this on any indiginous group, I would pick the Kurdish Peshmegras or some faction thereof.

1) Motive: Sectarian violence aids their objective of extablishing and independent state -- Balkanization.

2) Opportunity: Incorporation into the main force of the Iraqi Army means that they would have opportunity.

Most violence will be between Sunni and shia Arabs, while the Kurds, safe in their northern autonmous zone can sit and wathc their enemies kill each other.

[ 24 February 2006: Message edited by: Cueball ]


From: Out from under the bridge and out for a stroll | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
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posted 24 February 2006 01:08 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Jingles:
Bin Laden? Come on.

Who benefits? The architects of this war, who've been clear the the destruction of the Iraqi state was an objective. They don't want to Balkanize Iraq, they want to Jenin-ize Iraq.


Both.


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Contrarian
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posted 25 February 2006 02:47 AM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
This article by Mark LevineL: he has argued in the past, I think, that the US benefitted from chaos in Iraq and perhaps deliberately caused it.
quote:
...Understanding this dynamic is vital to appreciating the rationales behind a set of US policies in Iraq that at almost every turn have seemed to be characterized by strategic shortsightedness and sometimes outright incompetence. Such criticisms make sense only if we assume that the US has actually sought to create a vibrant, democratic Iraq. If we assume that its true goals have been less philanthropic--for example, securing a long term if reduced military presence in the country and a strong degree of influence in the disposition of its oil resources--then the chaos, corruption, and violence that have plagued the country for the last three years make more sense.

As a senior intelligence aid to former Coalition Provisional Authority Administrator Paul Bremer explained to a colleague of mine when asked about why American forces failed to rebuild in years what it took Hussein to do in months after the first Gulf War, “There's an old Arab proverb: If you starve a dog he'll follow you anywhere.”

In other words, why bother fixing a country when your strategy is to break the will of its people so they accept a post-occupation system, tailored to American interests, that they would otherwise not tolerate?...



From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 25 February 2006 07:18 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I misread the thread title as Iraq's Catch-22.
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
brookmere
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posted 25 February 2006 12:37 PM      Profile for brookmere     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
In other words, why bother fixing a country when your strategy is to break the will of its people so they accept a post-occupation system, tailored to American interests, that they would otherwise not tolerate?...

Well Israel has been trying just that since 1967 and it hasn't worked too well, has it?

I mean, really. It's peace and prosperity that make people acquiesce to American interests. You know, like post-WW2 Germany and Japan.

Chaos just sows more hatred and gives more fuel to extremists, most particularly in the Middle East.


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Transplant
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posted 25 February 2006 12:54 PM      Profile for Transplant     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
William F. Buckley: It Didn’t Work

"I can tell you the main reason behind all our woes — it is America." The New York Times reporter is quoting the complaint of a clothing merchant in a Sunni stronghold in Iraq. "Everything that is going on between Sunni and Shiites, the troublemaker in the middle is America."

One can't doubt that the American objective in Iraq has failed. The same edition of the paper quotes a fellow of the American Enterprise Institute. Mr. Reuel Marc Gerecht backed the American intervention. He now speaks of the bombing of the especially sacred Shiite mosque in Samara and what that has precipitated in the way of revenge. He concludes that “The bombing has completely demolished” what was being attempted — to bring Sunnis into the defense and interior ministries.

Our mission has failed because Iraqi animosities have proved uncontainable by an invading army of 130,000 Americans. The great human reserves that call for civil life haven't proved strong enough. No doubt they are latently there, but they have not been able to contend against the ice men who move about in the shadows with bombs and grenades and pistols.

The Iraqis we hear about are first indignant, and then infuriated, that Americans aren't on the scene to protect them and to punish the aggressors. And so they join the clothing merchant who says that everything is the fault of the Americans. ...


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Transplant
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posted 25 February 2006 12:59 PM      Profile for Transplant     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Only on Fox: "All-Out Civil War in Iraq: Could It Be a Good Thing?"

Media Matters - Summary: Fox News featured two onscreen captions during a segment on escalating violence in Iraq that read: " 'Upside' To Civil War?" and "All-Out Civil War in Iraq: Could It Be a Good Thing?" ...

Includes video clips.


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Rob8305
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posted 25 February 2006 07:32 PM      Profile for Rob8305     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by leftcoastguy:
Dead!

You're joking right? LOL. His recent audiotapes clearly show he is still alive.


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Transplant
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posted 28 February 2006 11:13 AM      Profile for Transplant     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
One week in Iraq: 1,300 killed

Toll in Iraq's Deadly Surge: 1,300

Was Post - Grisly attacks and other sectarian violence unleashed by last week's bombing of a Shiite Muslim shrine have killed more than 1,300 Iraqis, making the past few days the deadliest of the war outside of major U.S. offensives, according to Baghdad's main morgue. The toll was more than three times higher than the figure previously reported by the U.S. military and the news media.

Hundreds of unclaimed dead lay at the morgue at midday Monday -- blood-caked men who had been shot, knifed, garroted or apparently suffocated by the plastic bags still over their heads. Many of the bodies were sprawled with their hands still bound -- and many of them had wound up at the morgue after what their families said was their abduction by the Mahdi Army, the Shiite militia of cleric Moqtada al-Sadr.

"After he came back from the evening prayer, the Mahdi Army broke into his house and asked him, 'Are you Khalid the Sunni infidel?' " one man at the morgue said, relating what were the last hours of his cousin, according to other relatives. "He replied yes and then they took him away. ...


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eau
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posted 28 February 2006 03:18 PM      Profile for eau        Edit/Delete Post
Another appalling day of violence today. Who is in charge of security at the moment?
From: BC | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
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posted 28 February 2006 04:25 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
This question reminds me of the scene in Apocalypse Now where Captain Willard is "up river" and a group of GI's are holding a bridge against repeated NVA assaults. He is running around the trenches aksing: "Who is on command here?" He witnesses a GI use a grenade launcher kill an wonded NVA soldier hung up on the barbed wire, in the darkness using only the wounded soldiers screams to range his target.

Willard, thinking he has found someone who might actually have a clue, asks one more time:

"Soldier. Do you know who is in command here?"

The soldier looks at him sidways for a few seconds and then says: "I thought you were."

It seems the general outline this story is based on fact. I recently read a personal account of an American Liutenant in an engagement with the Chinese in the early part of the Korean war, which had the same essential dialogue -- a group of black soldier the liutenant encoutered hiding under a lorry. Or perhpas it is one of those 'essential' stories of military life during combat disasters.

[ 28 February 2006: Message edited by: Cueball ]


From: Out from under the bridge and out for a stroll | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
writer
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posted 01 March 2006 11:12 AM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
A must-read:

quote:
I’m reading, and hearing, about the possibility of civil war. The possibility. Yet I’m sitting here wondering if this is actually what civil war is like. Has it become a reality? Will we look back at this in one year, two years… ten… and say, “It began in February 2006…”? It is like a nightmare in that you don’t realise it’s a nightmare while having it- only later, after waking up with your heart throbbing, and your eyes searching the dark for a pinpoint of light, do you realise it was a nightmare…

Baghdad Burning



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Willowdale Wizard
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posted 01 March 2006 11:33 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
"the next iraqi war - sectarianism and civil conflict", international crisis group, 27 feb:

quote:
In the face of growing sectarian violence and rhetoric, institutional restraints have begun to erode. The cautioning, conciliatory words of Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, the Shiites’ pre-eminent religious leader, increasingly are falling on deaf ears. The secular centre has largely vanished, sucked into the maelstrom of identity politics.

If Iraq falls apart, historians may seek to identify years from now what was the decisive moment. The ratification of the constitution in October 2005, a sectarian document that both marginalised and alienated the Sunni Arab community? The flawed January 2005 elections that handed victory to a Shiite-Kurdish alliance, which drafted the constitution and established a government that countered outrages against Shiites with indiscriminate attacks against Sunnis? Establishment of the Interim Governing Council in July 2003, a body that in its composition prized communal identities over national-political platforms? Or, even earlier, in the nature of the ousted regime and its consistent and brutal suppression of political stirrings in the Shiite and Kurdish communities that it saw as threatening its survival? Most likely it is a combination of all four, as this report argues.


[ 01 March 2006: Message edited by: Willowdale Wizard ]


From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
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posted 01 March 2006 12:09 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Not to mention the people who dedicated many hours to promoting the Iraqi elections, as credible expressions of the peoples will, by analysing them as if it were a legtimate expression of the peoples will, and not merely a propoganda excersize.
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beluga2
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posted 01 March 2006 12:39 PM      Profile for beluga2     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Juan Cole: Iraq's worst week -- and Bush's

quote:
March 1, 2006 | The catastrophe in Iraq, the scope of which is now apparent to even the most disengaged observer, and his mishandling of the Dubai port issue have sent President George W. Bush's public approval ratings to the lowest of his presidency. According to a Reuters poll, only 34 percent of Americans believe he is doing a good job overall. Only 30 percent, less than a third, think he is managing the Iraq situation well. A remarkable 72 percent of American troops polled in Iraq think the U.S. should leave Iraq within the next year. Nor is there any hope for Bush on the horizon. The bloody events in Iraq have undermined American authority in that country and in the Middle East more generally. The Shiite clergy of Iran and Iraq have bolstered their own authority at Bush's expense. This development has already severely limited his scope of action in Iran, and will doubtless have many other negative consequences in the months and years ahead.

Tactically, strategically and politically Bush now finds himself in the worst of all possible worlds. With Americans increasingly fed up with the Iraq debacle, he needs to start drawing down troops soon, but he can't do it while the country teeters on the brink of civil war. If civil war does break out, a U.S. withdrawal will look even more like cutting and running -- under these circumstances, not even Karl Rove will be able to figure out a way to get away with simply declaring victory and going home. Yet if American troops stay, they have no good options either. The U.S. desperately needs to keep the Sunnis in the government, but if Shiites launch reprisal attacks against Sunnis, Americans will not be able to respond for fear that the Shiites, too, will turn on them -- as indeed they have already begun to do. And as the shrine bombing shows, Iraq is a vial of nitroglycerine that can be set off with one shake. Imagine what would happen if one of the leading clerics, Sunni or Shiite, was assassinated. It is difficult to say how aware Bush is of the reality in Iraq, but some part of him must be cursing the day he decided to invade it.

...

For the first three years of this colossal misadventure, Bush and his political advisors were able to obscure Iraq's harsh reality beneath a smoke screen of anti-terrorist fearmongering and patriotic fervor. But the smoke is blowing away. Bush emerged from this bloody week much feebler than ever before, both with regard to the U.S. public and with regard to that of Iraq. The problem for him is that Iraq has several more shrines, and if they are destroyed, he will again face the prospect of popular turbulence, and possibly calamity. Iraq, drifting toward theocracy and something approaching civil war, looks less and less like a model for the region, and more and more like an albatross around the neck of the Republican Party.



From: vancouvergrad, BCSSR | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
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posted 02 March 2006 02:59 AM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
"They told us that we had from then until 8 a.m. to leave or we would be killed," said 39-year-old Salim Rashid Hammar, who fled with his wife, four sons and two daughters.

"The factory owner tried to run them off, but they threatened to blow off his head," Hammar said. The owner took the families to his house for the night, then provided two factory trucks to take them to the main highway Saturday morning. They flagged down two minibuses for the trip to Baghdad.

Hammar's nephew, 24-year-old Rasoul Shahir Radhi, head of a family of 10 since his father died, voiced the deep frustration of the dozens of refugees, using stark language that ranged across the variety of troubles plaguing the Middle East.

"I'm not some Jew to be treated this way by Arabs. I'm just a Shiite," Radhi said.

"It looks to me like sectarian treachery among Shiites and Sunnis has won. All I am is an Iraqi person kicked out of Tarmiya, where I had to leave behind all my chickens to be eaten by the dogs. Sectarian treachery has won."


Evictions


From: Out from under the bridge and out for a stroll | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Américain Égalitaire
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posted 02 March 2006 11:05 AM      Profile for Américain Égalitaire   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by writer:
A must-read:


Yes it is but what really got to me was her description of the raid that took place in her neighbourhood a few weeks prior. That was chilling as hell and I wish average Americans could experience the same terror in their homes to understand the so-called "freedom and democracy" our weapons have brought to the Iraqi people.

We are truly damned for what we've done there.


From: Chardon, Ohio USA | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
writer
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posted 02 March 2006 11:42 AM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Agreed, AE. The blog in general is a must-read. One of the few female voices coming out of Iraq unfiltered. Every time I read a cutline referring to people in the street below an image of wall-to-wall men and boys demonstrating, fighting, celebrating or whatever, I shudder.

How often do we hear about the day-to-day realities of women enduring war? Why aren't we hearing from the majority of Iraqis - women and girls?


From: tentative | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Transplant
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posted 02 March 2006 12:02 PM      Profile for Transplant     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Américain Égalitaire:
Yes it is but what really got to me was her description of the raid that took place in her neighbourhood a few weeks prior. That was chilling as hell and I wish average Americans could experience the same terror in their homes to understand the so-called "freedom and democracy" our weapons have brought to the Iraqi people.

We are truly damned for what we've done there.


As I wrote elsewhere, I'm damned close to saying that they, meaning US troops in Iraq, can rot in the hell that their stupidity has created.

But then I remember the Iraqis.


From: Free North America | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Transplant
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posted 02 March 2006 01:20 PM      Profile for Transplant     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Baghdad official who exposed executions flees

Guardian - Faik Bakir, the director of the Baghdad morgue, has fled Iraq in fear of his life after reporting that more than 7,000 people have been killed by death squads in recent months, the outgoing head of the UN human rights office in Iraq has disclosed.

"The vast majority of bodies showed signs of summary execution - many with their hands tied behind their back. Some showed evidence of torture, with arms and leg joints broken by electric drills," said John Pace, the Maltese UN official. The killings had been happening long before the bloodshed after last week's bombing of the Shia shrine in Samarra.

Mr Pace, whose contract in Iraq ended last month, said many killings were carried out by Shia militias linked to the industry ministry run by Bayan Jabr, a leading figure in the Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq (Sciri).

Mr Pace said records, supported by photographs, came from Baghdad's forensic institute, which passed them to the UN. The Baghdad morgue has been receiving 700 or more bodies a month. The figures peaked at 1,100 last July - many showing signs of torture.

Reports of government-sponsored death squads have sparked fear among many prominent Iraqis, prompting a rise in the number leaving the country. Mr Pace said the morgue's director had received death threats after he reported the murders. "He's out of the country now," said Mr Pace, adding that the attribution of the killings to government-linked militias did not come from Dr Bakir. ...


From: Free North America | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
writer
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posted 02 March 2006 02:44 PM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Speaking of women: "It's outrageous," said activist Cindy Sheehan. "First we kill these poor women's families, then we tell them they don't have sufficient family ties. First we invade their country, then we refuse to allow them to visit ours."

Who Will Tell Our Stories?


From: tentative | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
jeff house
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posted 02 March 2006 03:12 PM      Profile for jeff house     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Human rights abuses in Iraq are as bad now as they were under Saddam Hussein, as lawlessness and sectarian violence sweep the country, the former U.N. human rights chief in Iraq said Thursday.

quote:
John Pace, who last month left his post as director of the human rights office at the U.N. Assistance Mission for Iraq, said the level of extra-judicial executions and torture is soaring, and morgue workers are being threatened by both government-backed militia and insurgents not to properly investigate deaths.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/iraq_human_rights


From: toronto | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Transplant
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posted 03 March 2006 11:44 AM      Profile for Transplant     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Roots of Iraq Civil War May Be in ‘Salvador Option’

Think Progress - It should come as no surprise, then, that sectarian death squads tied directly to the Iraqi Interior Ministry are running rampant in Iraq. Today we learned that the head of the Baghdad morgue has fled the country in fear for his life after reporting that the units have killed more than 7,000 people since last summer. The death squads operate so openly that an American military official in Iraq said, “the amazing this is…they tell you exactly what they are going to do.”

In a desperate bid to rescue a failed policy in Iraq, the Bush administration may have given the green light to a strategy that ends any hope of national reconciliation and finally tears Iraq apart along sectarian and ethnic lines. ...


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posted 03 March 2006 12:17 PM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
A few weeks ago, I interviewed a Marine commander in charge of training a brigade of Iraqi soldiers, most of whom were also Shiites, deployed in Sunni Arab dominated Anbar province. I asked him about the religious makeup of the Iraqi soldiers he oversaw.

"I‘ve never really asked or cared if they‘re Sunni, Shiite, or Kurd. Frankly, I don‘t care," said Col. Daniel Newell, who said his priority was instead to prepare capable troops, regardless of their religious identity, to take on the insurgency. "Some would criticize me for saying this or not knowing this."

At the time I remember hoping that he was right for deemphasizing the importance of the religious divide in Iraq — but also fearing that he wasnt.

Embedded With Marines in Iraq



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Transplant
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posted 08 March 2006 03:07 PM      Profile for Transplant     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Not a civil war, eh?

Gunmen seize 50 Iraq security men

BBC - Gunmen dressed in Iraqi police uniforms have raided the offices of a security firm in Baghdad, seizing 50 employees.

The incident happened in the eastern Zayouna district of the city. Among those captured was the head of the private firm, al-Rawafed.

It came after the bodies of 20 men were found dumped in the Iraqi capital.

Eighteen were left strangled or shot in a minibus in a western area populated mainly by Sunni Arabs. Two were found in east Baghdad tied up and shot.

Iraq has suffered a rise in sectarian attacks since a Shia shrine was bombed last month - but it is not clear if this was the cause.

However, the dumping of bodies has previously been a sign of the violence between minority Sunni Arab and majority Shia groups. ...

The attack on the al-Rawafed security company was carried out by uniformed gunmen, who forced the workers into several vehicles.

The victims - who included bodyguards, drivers, technicians and other employees - did not resist because they assumed their abductors were special forces, an interior ministry spokesman said. ...


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Muqtada al-Sadr: U.S., Britain and Israel a 'Triad of Evil'

AP - In a television interview Friday night, radical Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr described the United States, Israel and Britain as a "Triad of Evil".

Speaking on state-run Iraqiya television, the anti-American al-Sadr also said last month's attack on a Shiite shrine in the central city of Samarra was carried "in collusion with the occupiers and the Zionist Entity of Israel," meaning for the U.S. and Israel. Hundreds of Iraqis died in the subsequent sectarian violence, much of which Sunni Muslims said was the work of al-Sadr's militia, the Mahdi Army.

The Triad of Evil reference was an obvious play on words U.S. President Bush used in his 2002 State of the Union address, when he labeled Iraq, Iran and North Korea and "axis of evil." ...


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Margin of Error: Thousands Upon Thousands

Exact Death Toll of Iraqis Remains Murky

AP - Three years into the war, one grim measure of its impact on Iraqis can be seen at Baghdad's morgue: There, the staff has photographed and catalogued more than 24,000 bodies from the Baghdad area alone since 2003, almost all killed in violence.

Despite such snapshots, the overall number of Iraqi civilians and soldiers killed since the U.S.-led invasion in spring 2003 remains murky. Bloodshed has worsened each year, pushing the Iraqi death toll into the tens of thousands. But no one knows the exact toll.

President Bush has said he thinks violence claimed at least 30,000 Iraqi dead as of December, while some researchers have cited numbers of 50,000, 75,000 or beyond. ...


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Attack on Baghdad Shiite Slum Kills 44

AP - The feared resumption of mass sectarian violence erupted Sunday in a Baghdad Shiite slum when bombers blew apart two markets shortly before sundown, killing at least 44 people and wounding about 200.

The bloody assaults on Sadr City came only minutes after Iraqi political leaders said the new parliament will convene Thursday, three days earlier than planned, as the U.S. ambassador pushed to break a stalemate over naming a unity government.

The attackers struck with car bombs, including a suicide driver, and mortars at the peak shopping time, destroying dozens of market stalls and vehicles as the explosives ripped through the poor neighborhood as residents were buying food for their evening meals. ...


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Death squads operated from inside Iraqi government

Knight Ridder - Senior Iraqi officials Sunday confirmed for the first time that death squads composed of government employees had operated illegally from inside two government ministries.

"The deaths squads that we have captured are in the defense and interior ministries," Minister of Interior Bayan Jabr said during a joint news conference with the Minister of Defense. "There are people who have infiltrated the army and the interior." ...


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posted 13 March 2006 04:08 PM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
US Soldier and 69 Iraqis Killed Monday, US Soldier and 70 Iraqis Killed Sunday
Iraq Hangings Stoke Fears of More Violence

In the worst attack Monday, a roadside bomb exploded as police responded to a false report of bodies inside a store in Tikrit. Five policemen were killed and 15 injured in the blast, police Capt. Hakim al-Azawi said. A civilian bystander was also killed.

Later, provincial Gov. Hamad Mahmoud al-Qaisi escaped assassination when a car bomb ripped through his convoy in the city 80 miles north of Baghdad, police said. Two bodyguards were injured in the blast. Another car bomb exploded in a deserted street, causing no casualties, police said.

In the afternoon, authorities imposed an indefinite driving ban in Tikrit, which was announced over mosque loudspeakers.


Tikrit: birthplace to Saddam Hussein.


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posted 13 March 2006 04:12 PM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Many officers in the defeated Iraqi army and security services were Tikritis, as were a large number of Saddam Hussein's personal elite Special Republican Guards and the Fedayeen militia.

... The town is symbolic to many Iraqis. Saladin, the great Arab leader who recaptured Jerusalem from the Crusaders, was born in Tikrit in 1138. Saladin, who was of Kurdish extraction, became Sultan of Egypt and champion of Islam.

Tikrit: Saddam Hussein's home town



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posted 15 March 2006 11:09 AM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
"Let the (Iraqi) people unite and resist the invaders and their backers. Don't fight among yourselves," he said, praising the insurgency. "In my eyes, you are the resistance to the American invasion."

Saddam Hussein, testifying at his trial for the first time,
before he was cut off by the judge

ABC News



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unionist
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posted 15 March 2006 11:35 AM      Profile for unionist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by writer:

"Let the (Iraqi) people unite and resist the invaders and their backers. Don't fight among yourselves," he said, praising the insurgency. "In my eyes, you are the resistance to the American invasion."
[QB][/QB]


If Saddam Hussein is the only political figure issuing this call to the Iraqi people, then I'm afraid to say he is the best suited to be their leader. This is what the U.S. invasion has accomplished.


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posted 15 March 2006 11:56 AM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
U.S. military airstrikes significantly increased in Iraq

A review of military data shows that daily bombing runs and jet-missile launches have increased by more than 50 percent in the past five months, compared with the same period last year. Knight Ridder's statistical findings were reviewed and confirmed by American Air Force officials in the region.


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Boom Boom
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posted 15 March 2006 12:34 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Quote: U.S. military airstrikes significantly increased in Iraq

After all these years of bombing the hell out of Iraq, they're increasing the number of airstrikes???


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rici
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posted 15 March 2006 12:39 PM      Profile for rici     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Another interesting analysis by Michael Schwartz Iraq's Sovereignty Vacuum (part 1) (and part 2).

Forgive me if this has been posted somewhere else.


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posted 15 March 2006 05:12 PM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
"In Iraq it is no longer a matter of definition - 'civil war' or 'war' or 'violence' or 'terrorism.' It is all of the above,'' said one familiar with all of the above, Beirut scholar-politician Farid Khazen, a witness to Lebanon's 1975-1990 civil war.

What Would Iraq Civil War Look Like?


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josh
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posted 16 March 2006 12:21 PM      Profile for josh     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:

The U.S. military said on Thursday it had launched its biggest air offensive in Iraq since the 2003 invasion of the country.
A military statement said the operation involving more than 50 aircraft and 1,500 Iraqi and U.S. troops as well as 200 tactical vehicles targeted suspected insurgents operating in Salahuddin, a province that includes Samarra, a town located 60 miles north of Baghdad.



http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/11857580/from/RSS/


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jester
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posted 16 March 2006 01:18 PM      Profile for jester        Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Cueball:
Actually, if I were going to pin this on any indiginous group, I would pick the Kurdish Peshmegras or some faction thereof.

1) Motive: Sectarian violence aids their objective of extablishing and independent state -- Balkanization.

2) Opportunity: Incorporation into the main force of the Iraqi Army means that they would have opportunity.

Most violence will be between Sunni and shia Arabs, while the Kurds, safe in their northern autonmous zone can sit and wathc their enemies kill each other.

[ 24 February 2006: Message edited by: Cueball ]


Jalal Talibani has never specifically denied that his ultimate goal is an independent Kurdistan.Given that Turkey,Iran and Syria will not allow that to happen,the Kurds' Plan B may well be an autonomous Kurdistan within a balkanised Iraq while the Sunnis and Shiites weaken each other and the US keeps the Kurds' enemies at bay.


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al-Qa'bong
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posted 16 March 2006 09:12 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Shouldn't this thread be in the ME forum?
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Crippled_Newsie
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posted 17 March 2006 06:39 PM      Profile for Crippled_Newsie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by josh:
The U.S. military said on Thursday it had launched its biggest air offensive in Iraq since the 2003 invasion of the country....
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/11857580/from/RSS/

At least one reporter, TIME's Chris Albritton, sayd Operation Swarmer is an elaborate fraud:

quote:
BAGHDAD — Operation Swarmer is turning out to be much less than meets the eye, or the television camera, for that matter....
...
As noted, about 1,500 troops were involved, 700 American and 800 Iraqi. But get this: in the area they’re scouring there are only about 1,500 residents. According to my colleague and other reporters who were there, not a single shot has been fired.

“Operation Swarmer” is really a media show. It was designed to show off the new Iraqi Army — although there was no enemy for them to fight. Every American official I’ve heard has emphasized the role of the Iraqi forces just days before the third anniversary of the start of the war.


The official TIME version says much the same.


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writer
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posted 20 March 2006 01:55 PM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
I’m sitting here trying to think what makes this year, 2006, so much worse than 2005 or 2004. It’s not the outward differences- things such as electricity, water, dilapidated buildings, broken streets and ugly concrete security walls. Those things are disturbing, but they are fixable. Iraqis have proved again and again that countries can be rebuilt. No- it’s not the obvious that fills us with foreboding.

The real fear is the mentality of so many people lately- the rift that seems to have worked it’s way through the very heart of the country, dividing people.

Baghdad Burning



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Frustrated Mess
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posted 20 March 2006 02:25 PM      Profile for Frustrated Mess   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I had a thread dedicated to the topic of what appears to be the execution of children by US forces. It was closed which is a shame because, if it is true, it stands out as crime of horrific proportions and deserves to stand alone. Nevertheless:

quote:
We know that the only reason that this dead baby has his arm frozen to his lifeless face is that three years ago this week, George W. Bush gave the order to begin the unprovoked, unjust and unnecessary invasion of Iraq. He hasn't fired a single shot or launched a single missile; he hasn't tortured or killed any prisoners; he hasn't kidnapped or beheaded civilians or planted bombs along roadsides, in mosques or marketplaces. Yet every single atrocity of the war – on both sides – and every single death caused by the war, and every act of religious repression perpetrated by the extremist sects empowered by the war, is the direct result of the decision made by George W. Bush three years ago. Nothing he says can change this fact; nothing he does, or causes to be done, for good or ill, can wash the blood of these children – and the tens of thousands of other innocent civilians killed in the war – from his hands.

And anyone who knows these facts, who sees these facts, and fails to cry out against them – if only in your own heart – will be forever tainted by this same blood.


Chris Floyd

[ 20 March 2006: Message edited by: Frustrated Mess ]


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posted 20 March 2006 03:49 PM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
As mentioned there, it was closed because another thread about the incident predates yours:

air raid carnage

That said, thanks for adding the information here.

[ 20 March 2006: Message edited by: writer ]


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Cueball
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posted 20 March 2006 03:58 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by jester:

Jalal Talibani has never specifically denied that his ultimate goal is an independent Kurdistan.Given that Turkey,Iran and Syria will not allow that to happen,the Kurds' Plan B may well be an autonomous Kurdistan within a balkanised Iraq while the Sunnis and Shiites weaken each other and the US keeps the Kurds' enemies at bay.


More or less.


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Frustrated Mess
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posted 20 March 2006 04:06 PM      Profile for Frustrated Mess   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by writer:
As mentioned there, it was closed because another thread about the incident predates yours:

air raid carnage

That said, thanks for adding the information here.

[ 20 March 2006: Message edited by: writer ]



As best I could tell, they were different events although quite similar.

A different link; same article


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Cueball
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posted 20 March 2006 04:14 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by al-Qa'bong:
Shouldn't this thread be in the ME forum?

I don't see Palestinians mentioned in here? What are you on about?


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posted 20 March 2006 04:34 PM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
From text for the images that inspired the "air carnage" thread:

quote:
ISAHAQI , IRAQ ? MARCH 15: (EDITORS NOTE: GRAPHIC CONTENT) The bodies of two children allegedly killed in a U.S raid lay on the ground before burial on March 15, 2006 in the village of Isahaqi about 50 miles north of Baghdad, Iraq. Eleven people were killed when a house was allegedly bombed during an early morning U.S military raid. The dead were mainly women and children. (Photo by Getty Images)

From the Chris Floyd piece:

quote:
What happened in the village of Isahaqi, north of Baghdad, on Ides of March?

From the Reuters piece linked to at the beginning of FM's thread:

quote:
The U.S. military said in a statement its troops had attacked a house in Ishaqi early on Wednesday to capture a "foreign fighter facilitator for the al Qaeda in Iraq network".

Edited to add: All of which confirms that the discussion in "air raid carnage" began with the attack against civilians in Isahaqi - the subject of Frustrated Mess's thread, too.

I put this thread in the "news" section when the bombing of the shrine had just happened. I would like this to be a thread centred on news items from Iraq, and so I would like it to stay in the news section. News happens around the world.

[ 21 March 2006: Message edited by: writer ]


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Cueball
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posted 20 March 2006 10:24 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Yes, well I think the apparent massacre of 11 Iraqi civilians is worthy of its own thread. So, I am starting one here: Because I think its news of Abu Ghraib or Mai Lai like proportions and not linked to the Civil War, or the bombing of the Mosque in Najaf

[ 20 March 2006: Message edited by: Cueball ]


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posted 21 March 2006 12:06 PM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Cueball, you are missing the point: there IS a thread about the attack, entitled "air raid carnage". Having two threads on the exact same topic at the same time is a bit confusing, no? This is why Frustrated Mess's thread - which came after the initial one - was closed.

Anyway:

quote:
Insurgents Storm Jail North of Baghdad, Freeing All 33 Prisoners and Killing 19 Iraqi Policemen

As many as 100 insurgents armed with automatic rifles and rocket-propelled grenades stormed the judicial compound in Muqdadiyah, about 60 miles northeast of the capital.

... Meanwhile, a group of U.S. senators met with interim Prime Minister Ibrahim al-Jaafari in Baghdad to discuss prospects for forming a national unity government ...



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posted 21 March 2006 01:55 PM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
"Iraqis took a look and decided not to go to civil war."
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Cueball
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posted 21 March 2006 04:52 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Oh, I guess I did misunderstand.
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posted 21 March 2006 05:15 PM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Can I expect an apology in the duplicate thread you started, where you loudly claimed that I've got some agenda against the news from Isahaqi?

[ 21 March 2006: Message edited by: writer ]


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Cueball
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posted 21 March 2006 05:26 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Actually I didn't mean to say anything about you. Where did I? I simply asserted that threads were being closed.
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posted 21 March 2006 05:31 PM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Look, you didn't name me by name, but the implication is there. And the gang-up - which you joined - is there for all to see in your thread. Take ownership or don't. I'd rather not derail this thread with this kind of stuff. People are dying.
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Cueball
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posted 21 March 2006 06:00 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
And look, I didn't single you out for any personal attacks. I was really just supporting the general arguement. If I had wanted to attack you personally I would have.

I think my rcognizing the truth of your statement is just as good as an apology, given that all I did was assert that the story of these massacres deserved its own thread.


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Michelle
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posted 24 March 2006 08:33 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Today is the day I do board maintenance! Yay!

I'm moving this thread to the Middle East forum right after I post this article by Scott Piatkowski:

quote:
As the third anniversary of the start of the Iraq War passes (heck, we're already approaching the third anniversary of when it was supposed to end), I thought it might be instructive to revisit some of the more interesting things that were said back in the first half of 2003.

Mea culpa, anyone?


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Cueball
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posted 26 March 2006 07:53 AM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
3 Years of War Wither a Family's Seed of Hope

quote:
Street fighting never came to his neighborhood. On April 6, Butti crossed the river and joined his family. Together on a rooftop they watched the tanks enter the city. His wife, Balsam, a more vociferous critic of Saddam Hussein's regime, greeted arriving U.S. soldiers with tea and biscuits.

The soldiers refused.

"We were so happy" that the soldiers had arrived, Balsam Butti recalled later. "But they were afraid of us."

Her husband, for his part, was bewildered by the sight of Americans riding their tanks through the streets of his city.

The idea that his country was occupied by foreigners made Butti uncomfortable. Still, a hope grew. With the Americans, perhaps a kind of progress would arrive.

[SNIP]

Under Hussein's secular rule, Iraq's Christians were allowed to prosper and practice their faith without much trouble. At Christmas, Iraqi Muslims would go out caroling with their Christian neighbors.

But in the new Iraq, Christians in the Buttis' neighborhood received death threats and fled. By Christmas 2004, pews at their local church were half empty. Extremists targeted barbers for giving Western-style haircuts and violating strict Islamic teachings by trimming or removing men's beards. Baher Butti forbade his teenage son to wear his hair the way he wanted it — spiky.


[ 26 March 2006: Message edited by: Cueball ]


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unionist
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posted 26 March 2006 06:13 PM      Profile for unionist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
U.S. troops kill more than 20 worshippers at Baghdad mosque

quote:
US troops have launched two raids against Shia militias in Baghdad, according to reports.

At least 18 people are said to have been killed in one of the raids on a mosque where militants loyal to Shia cleric Moqtada al-Sadr were based. [...]

In Baghdad, an aide to Mr Sadr accused the US of killing unarmed people at the mosque.

"The American forces went into Mustafa mosque at prayers and killed more than 20 worshippers," Hazim al-Araji told Reuters news agency, citing a larger death toll than the 18 counted by medical sources.



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Cueball
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posted 27 March 2006 10:02 AM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Suicide bomber targets area praised by Bush

quote:
A suicide bomber attacked a joint U.S.-Iraqi military base in northern Iraq in Monday, killing at least 15 people and wounding as many as 30, the Iraqi military said. At least 21 more corpses were found — many with nooses around their neck — and mortar and bomb attacks killed at least four.

The nationalities of the victims in the suicide bombing about 30 kilometres east of the ancient city of Tal Afar were not immediately known. The bomber struck shortly after noon at an Iraqi army recruiting centre in front of the base.

U.S. President George W. Bush singled out Tal Afar in a recent speech as a success story for American and Iraqi forces in the drive to quell the insurgency.


But its an AP story and they aren't always reliable.

[ 27 March 2006: Message edited by: Cueball ]


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unionist
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posted 27 March 2006 10:04 AM      Profile for unionist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Anti-side-scroll message.
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writer
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posted 29 March 2006 04:21 PM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
“The Ministry of Defense requests that civilians do not comply with the orders of the army or police on nightly patrols unless they are accompanied by coalition forces working in that area.”

Baghdad Burning


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Cueball
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posted 29 March 2006 08:38 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
وزارة الدفاع تدعو المواطنين الى عدم الانصياع لاوامر دوريات الجيش والشرطة الليلية اذا لم تكن برفقة قوات التحالف العاملة في تلك المنطقة

Don't want that to get lost in the blog.

The discussion:

quote:
So what does it mean?” My cousin’s wife asked as we sat gathered at lunch.

“It means if they come at night and want to raid the house, we don’t have to let them in.” I answered.

“They’re not exactly asking your permission,” E. pointed out. “They break the door down and take people away- or have you forgotten?”

“Well according to the Ministry of Defense, we can shoot at them, right? It’s trespassing-they can be considered burglars or abductors…” I replied.

The cousin shook his head, “If your family is inside the house- you’re not going to shoot at them. They come in groups, remember? They come armed and in large groups- shooting at them or resisting them would endanger people inside of the house.”

“Besides that, when they first attack, how can you be sure they DON’T have Americans with them?” E. asked.

We sat drinking tea, mulling over the possibilities. It confirmed what has been obvious to Iraqis since the beginning- the Iraqi security forces are actually militias allied to religious and political parties.


[ 29 March 2006: Message edited by: Cueball ]


From: Out from under the bridge and out for a stroll | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
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posted 01 April 2006 12:39 AM      Profile for Transplant     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
U.S. raid on Shiite shrine served as a warning

US News & World Reprt - The U.S. military was trying to send a "little reality jab" to radical Shiite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr when American and Iraqi troops raided a Shiite community center and shrine over the weekend, says a top U.S. military official.

The joint assault killed at least 16 people, most of them believed to be tied to Sadr's militia, the Mahdi Army. U.S. officials insist the center was being used as a base for insurgent activities and was not a mosque. But many Iraqis say the complex did indeed include the Shiite equivalent of a mosque, and the raid has drawn harsh condemnation from Shiite politicians and prompted Iraqi President Jalal Talabani, a Kurd, to launch an investigation.

The mayor of Baghdad promptly cut off cooperation with the U.S. Embassy, and Shiite politicians suspended their negotiations to form a new government. The U.S. military has long contemplated taking tougher steps against Sadr and his troublesome militia but has held off in the past because it did not want to antagonize his many fervent supporters. This raid, officials say, was intended as a reminder to Sadr of the U.S. military's reach in Iraq.


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posted 07 April 2006 10:49 AM      Profile for Transplant     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Mosque Explosion Kills 40 in Iraq

CNN - Three suicide bombers on Friday struck a Baghdad mosque affiliated with a major Shiite political party, killing at least 43 people and wounding 138 others, police said.

The attack happened at the Buratha mosque, which has close ties to the Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq, a part of the Shiite-led United Iraqi Alliance. The alliance won a plurality in the December 15 parliamentary elections. ...


AP - Two suicide attackers wearing women's cloaks blew themselves up Friday in a Shiite mosque in northern Baghdad, killing at least 40 people and wounding scores, police said. It was the second major attack against Shiite targets in as many days. ...

[ 07 April 2006: Message edited by: Transplant ]

[ 07 April 2006: Message edited by: Transplant ]


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