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Author Topic: The Obscenity that is the Occupation of Iraq
thwap
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5062

posted 27 February 2006 02:31 PM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post
This commondreams article

discusses the significance of the destruction of the Askariya mosque, as well as "who benefits?" :

quote:
A knowledgeable friend of this publication told of early morning, the dawn the Shrine was bombed. A businesman friend who always rose early. left his home to buy goods and open his company by 7am.

'By the Mosque,it was crawling with government, security, Iraqi Army people.' A little later the explosion happened. 'I had thought this was preparation for a routine visit by some official from Baghdad ... ' The attack was expert.


Conspiracy theories are inevitable, given stories such as this one about the British soldiers who had been arrested by Iraqi police and then freed when the British attacked the police station of their Iraqi "allies."

quote:
What is clear is that the two SAS “undercover operatives” had been caught red-handed by the British government’s alleged allies, the Iraqi police, dressed as Arabs, replete with wigs and armed to the teeth and in a car which according to one report, was packed with explosives (the car by the way, has been taken away by the British occupation forces).

The question the BSBC was not and still is not asking, is what were they up to, creeping around dressed up as Iraqis in what is meant to be a relatively peaceful Basra?


Between the crime, the insurgency and the Iraqi government's death squads and the brutish occupation forces, one is quite at a loss to know what to believe.

And then there's
Halliburton:

quote:
One tale is particularly instructive: Halliburton's strenuous efforts to prevent a company hired by the Iraqis, Lloyd-Owen International, from delivering gasoline into the conquered land from Kuwait for 18 cents a gallon. Why? Because LOI's cost-efficient operation undercuts Halliburton's highway-robbery price of $1.30 a gallon for the exact same service.

But how is Halliburton able to interfere with the sacred process of free enterprise? Well, it seems that Cheney's firm, a private company, has control over the U.S. military checkpoint on the volatile Iraq-Kuwait border, and also has the authority to grant - or withhold - the Pentagon ID cards that are indispensable for contractors operating in Iraq. (Even contractors who, like LOI, are working for the supposedly sovereign Iraqi government.) Halliburton used these powers to block LOI's access to the military crossing - which provides quick, safe delivery of the fuel - for months. Then the game got rougher.

In June, Cheney's boys blackmailed LOI into delivering some construction materials to a Halliburton project in the friendly confines of Fallujah: no delivery, no "golden ticket" Pentagon card, said Halliburton. They neglected to tell LOI that convoys on the route had been repeatedly hit by insurgents in recent days. And sure enough, LOI's delivery trucks were ripped to shreds just outside a Halliburton-operated military base: three men were killed and seven wounded. But that's not all. An email obtained by investigators revealed that Halliburton brass expressly prohibited company employees from offering any assistance to the shattered convoy.


Then there's the mercenaries videotaping themselves shooting at cars at random (link).

It's the "Wild Middle East," except its a nightmare of crime, rape, and death.

And somehow, there's "another side" of the story, "another point of view" that sees the glass as half-full and which it is my problem that I can't see it.

[ 27 February 2006: Message edited by: thwap ]


From: Hamilton | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
nister
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7709

posted 27 February 2006 03:38 PM      Profile for nister     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
http://weekly.ahram.org.eg/2006/783/re11.htm

The Egyptian author has a lot to add here. Some references I didn't get, but I agree with his conclusions, which dovetail with yours, thwap.


From: Barrie, On | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
skeptikool
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Babbler # 11389

posted 27 February 2006 04:11 PM      Profile for skeptikool        Edit/Delete Post
It's only necessary to refer to some of these incidents to bring on upwards eye-rolling with snide assertions re: paranoia, and even suggestions regarding missed medications.

Too many past tricks of imperialist nations have been revealed to shrug off such stories.


From: Delta BC | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
DrConway
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 490

posted 03 March 2006 12:19 PM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
This is civil war

quote:
WHEN he trucked his young family off to Khan Dhari back in 1989, Majid Jabar Mozan gave little thought to the significance of his new hometown in Iraq's revolutionary history.

Back then the equation was simple for a struggling young mechanic — he was getting a government apartment that went with his government job.


Now the man and his family have to take charity from a mosque to stay alive.


From: You shall not side with the great against the powerless. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
thwap
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Babbler # 5062

posted 03 March 2006 01:31 PM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post
I had a run-in with some ugly-brained bushloving fuckwads on an American site the other day. They responded to my condemnations of their crimes against humanity with teenaged snickering.

In all honesty, I believe that this is such a blatant example of criminality, incompetence and barbarity, that bush II and his supporters will suffer for it.

The pointlessness for which US lives were cast away, and the enormity of the needless cruelty that has been inflicted on the people of Iraq is going to be presented to the American people. There will be a reckoning.


From: Hamilton | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
writer
editor emeritus
Babbler # 2513

posted 03 March 2006 02:01 PM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
It's the "Wild Middle East," except its a nightmare of crime, rape, and death.

Just wanted to point out that the nightmare of crime, rape and death was also a centrepiece of the Wild West brand of imperialism.

Whenever I read that the worst terrorist act in North America happened on September 11, 2001, I think of the "Indian Wars", Hudson's Bay and slavery (and so on). Terrorism has had a long, romanticized tradition here.


From: tentative | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
rici
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Babbler # 2710

posted 03 March 2006 02:10 PM      Profile for rici     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by thwap:
In all honesty, I believe that this is such a blatant example of criminality, incompetence and barbarity, that bush II and his supporters will suffer for it.

The pointlessness for which US lives were cast away, and the enormity of the needless cruelty that has been inflicted on the people of Iraq is going to be presented to the American people. There will be a reckoning.


There certainly should be. Many South American ex-dictators and torturers are in jail, so it is not beyond hope.

However, it has to be said that a lot of US lives have been cast away, and a lot more non-US lives ruined, over the years in the pursuit of needless cruelty in various parts of the world, and not a lot has happened. It takes quite a lot for a country to try its own, and more so if the victims are primarily foreign and therefore invisible.

This is why I believe that it is so important to take every possible opportunity to endorse, encourage and strengthen the rule of international law, and expose the US hypocrisy of claiming to "spread democracy" while systematically violating and undermining international conventions.

Having said that, I will add that many other countries are open to the charge of hypocrisy; there is no question in my mind that democracy at home is the best way of providing credibility in the struggle for international democracy.


From: Lima, Perú | Registered: Jun 2002  |  IP: Logged
thwap
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5062

posted 03 March 2006 02:12 PM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post
two good posts.

but i'd just like to thank writer for pointing out something obvious that i had (tellingly, i guess) missed.


From: Hamilton | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
writer
editor emeritus
Babbler # 2513

posted 03 March 2006 03:55 PM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
thwap, thanks so much for your response. It made my day.
From: tentative | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged

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