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Author Topic: Egyptian reformers protest Mubarak
Macabee
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5227

posted 30 July 2005 10:20 PM      Profile for Macabee     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Let's take a moment to reflect and hope for the courageous Egyptian reformists. Despite this violence this may be the dawning of a new epoch in Egypt.

Reform protest


From: Vaughan | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
salaam
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4670

posted 31 July 2005 02:37 AM      Profile for salaam     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
The attackers in plainclothes were members of the security forces. I've witnessed protests like this before in Jordan. Similar protests have occurred in Egypt and almost everywhere in this region for years. They always end "quietly", with hundreds arrested, torture, indefinate imprisonment and, for some, death.

It seems that these protests are being organized mainly by leftist and liberal activists (although many Moslems are are also participating). Islamic organizations have far deeper and wider grass-roots support in Egypt and the entire region, and therefore are a far greater threat to dictators, and their colonialist sponsors.

In the last deacde, its seems that the US has been encouraging its client states more restraint when faced with critisism and protest. (Although, the US itself is becoming more aggressive and intolerant since 11/9) The idea is to prevent people from moving away from co-opted and controlled movements (ie. Moslem Brotherhood) and moving towards more independent, underground, and less controllable political movements.

Also the international media is reporting the protests. Possibly because of these factors the government is not cracking down on the protests as severly as they usually do.

Throughout the Arab world there are sentiments common to almost all people. Political, economic, and military independence, and unity of entire region, which requires freedom of expression, improving education, and opposing and protecting the region from western interference - where removing Zionism from Palestine is the most recognizable call. (All noble goals towards which I hope all conscientious people can unite in support.)
The US, and Israel, would never allow this of course.

The only real reforms the US will allow are some beaurocratic and cosmetic changes (away from (UK-style) monarchy towards (US-style) "democracy". The people themselves, of course, will not be allowed any role or real options, other than to accept what ever leaders are chosen for them.

As for Kifaya, I expect this movement will be co-opted, by encouraging "moderate" reformers, and the government cracking down on the less co-operative elements who will be accused of violence or encouraging it, framed and labeled "terrorists". Protest will die out again for a while, as the world looks away.

[ 31 July 2005: Message edited by: salaam ]


From: exile | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
Wilf Day
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3276

posted 09 September 2005 04:20 PM      Profile for Wilf Day     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
American schizophrenia towards Islamists continues.

At the same time as Americans seek a secular, democratic Iraq, the Washington Post criticises Mubarak for banning what they call the "real opposition," the Moslem Brotherhood:

quote:
Mr. Mubarak must allow more of the real Egyptian opposition into the process; he could do this by granting the pending registration of the Center Party, a moderate Islamic grouping that would attract many supporters of the banned Muslim Brotherhood.

And they usually prefer the First Past The Post system, except in Egypt:

quote:
only parties with parliamentary representation of 5 percent or more may nominate candidates in future presidential elections. If the upcoming vote is fair, it will drastically reduce the suffocating authority of the ruling party; if it is not, the election of Mr. Mubarak's successor will probably be as lopsided and unfair as this week's vote.

President Bush need not ask Mr. Mubarak for radical change -- only for steps that liberal activists in his own party favor. These begin with allowing slates of parliamentary candidates to be elected by proportional representation; the current system of more than 400 districts makes it impossible for opposition parties to compete.


File that away for the next time someone says FPTP is the democratic, i.e., American, way.

[ 09 September 2005: Message edited by: Wilf Day ]


From: Port Hope, Ontario | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
Hugo the Liberator
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 10240

posted 09 September 2005 08:21 PM      Profile for Hugo the Liberator        Edit/Delete Post
left-liberal parties won 20% of the popular vote. (I bet the real number was close to 90.)

I think any individual that supports Egypt's National Democratic Party's being a member of the Socialist International ouight to be expelled from any leftist organisation of which they are a member. They're fascists anyways, and we're just helping them realise it.


From: Caracas | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
voice of the damned
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6943

posted 10 September 2005 11:20 AM      Profile for voice of the damned     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
I think any individual that supports Egypt's National Democratic Party's being a member of the Socialist International ouight to be expelled from any leftist organisation of which they are a member.

In my experience, most left-wing organizations have more pressing matters to deal with than investigating individual members' opinions about Egyptian political parties being in the SI.

Does your namesake Chavez make it his business to know these sorts of things about everyone in his party?


From: Asia | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged
Hugo the Liberator
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Babbler # 10240

posted 11 September 2005 01:22 AM      Profile for Hugo the Liberator        Edit/Delete Post
I doubt authoritarian conservatives like Mubarak would have much of a future in Chavez's Venezuela.
From: Caracas | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
voice of the damned
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6943

posted 11 September 2005 12:43 PM      Profile for voice of the damned     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
I doubt authoritarian conservatives like Mubarak would have much of a future in Chavez's Venezuela.

Well, that wasn't exactly my question, but okay.


From: Asia | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged

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