babble home
rabble.ca - news for the rest of us
today's active topics


  
FAQ | Forum Home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» babble   » archived babble   » the middle east and central asia   » The Democracy Lie

Email this thread to someone!    
Author Topic: The Democracy Lie
The Other Todd
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7964

posted 21 March 2005 05:09 PM      Profile for The Other Todd     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
[Cheer not Righties, curse not Lefties; read _past_ the first 'graph and behold . . . .]

The Democracy Lie
By Juan Cole

Is George W. Bush right to argue that his war to overthrow Saddam Hussein is democratizing the Middle East? In the wake of the Iraq vote, anti-Syrian demonstrations in Lebanon, the Egyptian president's gestures toward open elections and other recent developments, a chorus of conservative pundits has declared that Bush's policy has been vindicated. Max Boot wrote in the Los Angeles Times, "Well, who's the simpleton now? Those who dreamed of spreading democracy to the Arabs or those who denied that it could ever happen?" In a column subtitled "One Man, One Gloat," Mark Steyn wrote, "I got a lot of things wrong these last three years, but looking at events in the Middle East this last week ... I got the big stuff right." Even some of the president's detractors and those opposed to the war have issued mea culpas. Richard Gwyn of the Toronto Star, a Bush critic, wrote, "It is time to set down in type the most difficult sentence in the English language. That sentence is short and simple. It is this: Bush was right."

http://www.alternet.org/story/21540/


From: Ottawa | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 29 March 2005 11:01 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Iraq's parliament has indefinitely delayed naming a new candidate for the post of parliament speaker, after last-minute negotiations failed to produce a suitable candidate.

The delay, announced by interim speaker Dhari al-Fayadh, was met with disdain by several members of the assembly.

A woman in full-length black robe, one of 85 women elected to parliament, stood up to say the eight million Iraqis who risked their lives to vote on 30 January deserved better.



Iraq assembly delays naming speaker

quote:
Egyptian police will no longer tolerate the pro-reform rallies that have been taking place in the past months, Cairo's security director has said.

Major General Nabil al-Azabi issued the stern warning on Tuesday, a day before democratic activists and a banned Islamic group are due to hold a joint demonstration in front of parliament.


Egypt police to crack down on rallies

[ 29 March 2005: Message edited by: al-Qa'bong ]


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 30 March 2005 01:16 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Nonetheless, even if all these objections with regard to the missionary policy of President Bush are well founded, it would be absurd to ratiocinate and to deny that something is happening. Is it due to George W. Bush himself and his rhetoric? To the intimidating effect of American force on several regimes who have thus been placed on the defensive? To profound movements in the heart of Arab peoples abandoned by modernity, but attracted by the image of it presented by the media and the Internet? To the activity of several Arab leaders and modern thinkers who have prepared the ground?

In the end, it matters little. Since a movement has begun, it is vital for the Arab people, and also for their close European neighbors, that it not turn into a catastrophe. Let us not forget that in the nineteenth century, the nationalist principle that enthused revolutionary as well as Bonapartist France modernized Europe, but also put it to fire and blood.

The real difference is not between those who are for democracy in the Arab world and those who are against it. Who can be against it? The difference is between those for whom it's an easy posture, a way of criticizing European diplomacies, a dilatory pretext for further delaying the necessary Palestinian state, a missionary exaltation, and those conscious of the risks, for whom it's a serious and responsible long-term commitment, a necessary and desirable - but also high risk - process that will stretch out over years and must, in consequence, be managed with perseverance and care with regard to method and rhythm.


Hubert Védrine


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Fidel
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5594

posted 30 March 2005 06:39 AM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
The Yanks propping-up monarchies in Saudi Arabia and Kuwait doesn't seem very democratic, does it?.
Just so long as social democracy is held in check, and the oil is free to be exploited by the Anglo-American-Dutch petroeleum cartel, then everything's peachy and to hell with basic human rights.

From: Viva La Revolución | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
nister
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7709

posted 30 March 2005 11:24 AM      Profile for nister     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Since Bush is taking creds for the "Arab Spring" he needs to take blame for the spate of bombings in Beirut. He needs to fess up to Lebanon losing $3.5 billion hard cash withdrawn from Lebanese banks by Syria as a result of his butt-inskyness, and a drying up of Syrian investment much needed by Lebanon.
From: Barrie, On | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
B.L. Zeebub LLD
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6914

posted 30 March 2005 10:48 PM      Profile for B.L. Zeebub LLD     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Well, if we recall the events in Iran in 1978-9 which had a populist tinge, the more recent events in Algeria, and perhaps even Turkey an interesting picture emerges. I suspect that the 'democracy' that may emerge in many Middle Eastern states will not have the neo-cons gloating so much. I imagine that the kind of radicalised, anti-Western and Islamicized 'democracy' that emerges and threatens the stability of the ol' chessboard will be disconcerting to all of them. The irony is simple - what if 'democracy' works to well and a whole series of popularly supported governments emerges which are even more hostile to the West than the largely compliant regimes extant in Saudi, Egypt, Iraq, etc.?
From: A Devil of an Advocate | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged
The Other Todd
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7964

posted 31 March 2005 06:54 PM      Profile for The Other Todd     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Mmm-hm.

"There is a surplus of democracy in the world which is interfering with the free movement of capital and investment."

Renato Ruggiero, former director-general of the WTO


From: Ottawa | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged

All times are Pacific Time  

   Close Topic    Move Topic    Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
Hop To:

Contact Us | rabble.ca | Policy Statement

Copyright 2001-2008 rabble.ca