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Author Topic: Joseph Massad on Anti-Semitism
Coyote
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posted 16 December 2004 01:57 PM      Profile for Coyote   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Al-ahram:
quote:
Anyone who believes in social justice and opposes racist oppression must be in solidarity with all holocaust victims, especially European Jews, 90 per cent of whom were exterminated by a criminal and genocidal regime. Such a person must equally be against the Zionist abduction of the holocaust to justify Israel's colonial and racist policies. The attempt by holocaust deniers to play down the number of holocaust victims is obscene, as whether one million or 10 million Jews were killed, the result is still genocide and this would never justify Israel's oppression of the Palestinians. Such obscene number games on the part of holocaust deniers are hardly different from Zionist Jewish denial of the Palestinian nakba and are also similar to the continued Zionist attempts to play down the number of Palestinian refugees. While the nakba and the holocaust are not equivalent in any sense, the logic of denying them is indeed the same. I should stress here that the Palestine Liberation Organisation and most Palestinian intellectuals have spoken and written since the 1960s of their solidarity with Jewish holocaust victims and have attacked those who deny it took place. Unlike the official and unofficial Israeli denial of the expulsion of the Palestinians and the numbers of the refugees, those who deny the holocaust among Palestinians have no position whatsoever inside the PLO nor any legitimacy among the Palestinian intelligentsia.

From: O’ for a good life, we just might have to weaken. | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged
Phonicidal
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posted 16 December 2004 02:08 PM      Profile for Phonicidal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
anti-Semitism:
quote:
Main Entry: an·ti-Sem·i·tism
Pronunciation: "an-ti-'se-m&-"ti-z&m, "an-"tI-
Function: noun
: hostility toward or discrimination against Jews as a religious, ethnic, or racial group
- an·ti-Se·mit·ic /-s&-'mi-tik/ adjective
- an·ti-Sem·ite /-'se-"mIt/ noun

From: Thornhill, Ontario, Canada | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Jingles
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posted 16 December 2004 02:11 PM      Profile for Jingles     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Are you implying something, phony?
From: At the Delta of the Alpha and the Omega | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
Phonicidal
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posted 16 December 2004 02:19 PM      Profile for Phonicidal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Jingles:
Are you implying something, phony?
The author's entire premise is wrong from the beginning. The term Semite was not made up in the 1800s in Europe. It is rooted in the biblical belief that "semites" (Jews, Arabs, etc.) decended from Noah's son Shem.

From: Thornhill, Ontario, Canada | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 16 December 2004 02:22 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Interesting article, Coyote. I'm guessing that Massad was a student -- at least a colleague -- of Said's?
From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
remind
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posted 16 December 2004 04:03 PM      Profile for remind     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Please provide proof, the author of the article provided proof for his contentions, the very same is expected of those who say otherwise.


quote:
Originally posted by Phonicidal:
The author's entire premise is wrong from the beginning. The term Semite was not made up in the 1800s in Europe. It is rooted in the biblical belief that "semites" (Jews, Arabs, etc.) decended from Noah's son Shem.

From: "watching the tide roll away" | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 19 December 2004 08:34 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
The author's entire premise is wrong from the beginning. The term Semite was not made up in the 1800s in Europe. It is rooted in the biblical belief that "semites" (Jews, Arabs, etc.) decended from Noah's son Shem.

Wrong and right at the same time.

The word denotes those who were supposedly descended from Shem, yet it was first used in the early 19th century, according to the OED.


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Phonicidal
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posted 19 December 2004 11:39 PM      Profile for Phonicidal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by al-Qa'bong:
The word denotes those who were supposedly descended from Shem, yet it was first used in the early 19th century, according to the OED.
Tham may be it's first use in English. But, it looks like it was used before that in other languages. The term, "anti-Semite", however, was used in the early 19th century.

Anyway, the point is that no serious user of the English language believes that the word "anti-Semitism" means anything but a hostility towards Jews and Jews only (that was the purpose of my quoting of a dictionary above). Yes, Arabs and other groups may also be "semites". But, suggesting the word means something it does not is nothing more than an attempt to dilute the seriousness and reality of the definition of anti-Semitism as Jew-haterd.

[ 19 December 2004: Message edited by: Phonicidal ]


From: Thornhill, Ontario, Canada | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 20 December 2004 12:00 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Tham may be it's first use in English. But, it looks like it was used before that in other languages.


What do you mean, "it looks like"?


Yes, the English word "Semite" has roots in Latin and Greek, but the particular meaning ascribed to it came about in the 19th century.

In any case, this thread is an apt demonstration of why PR flacks shouldn't be allowed to determine how language is used.


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
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posted 20 December 2004 12:20 AM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
If you guys are interested in Joseph Massad, there's an article by him here on HNN. They often have articles and some pretty virulent arguments on this site over the Middle East; some posters are academic historians but many are not; and there is very little moderating that I can see; also you cannot go back and edit posts.
From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged

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