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Author Topic: What is the difference between the Palestinian Authority and the PLO?
prowsej
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Babbler # 798

posted 24 November 2004 02:42 PM      Profile for prowsej   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Was reading on bitter-lemons:
quote:
First, when it comes to peace process issues, Israel is treaty-bound to negotiate with the Palestine Liberation Organization, not the Palestinian Authority. This is clearly stipulated in the Oslo Declaration of Principles. The PLO has already selected its new leader, Abu Mazen (Mahmoud Abbas). The January 9 elections will, if Abu Mazen wins, confirm leadership through a democratic process and signify that the posts of PLO leader and PA leader are effectively synonymous.
I don't understand the way the PLO and PA interact. For example, which is it that has observer status at the UN? Wikipedia says that they both do
- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PLO
- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palestinian_Authority

From: Ottawa ON | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
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posted 24 November 2004 09:16 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
PLO is a was originally founded in 1964 as a convergence of the main Palestinian resistance groups, the Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine, the Peoples Front for the Liberation of Palestine, Fatah and a few others. It's military wing was originally a group of more or less regular army formations, intended to operate sided by side with other Arab armies in wars with Israel.

The PLO also founded the PNA (Palestine National Assembly) as a represntative body, aside from the Central Committee of the PLO) The PNA became the legistaltive assembly that ran the Palestine Authority.

The difference is, at least in theory, the PLO is a coalition of groups organized around forwarding Palestinian rights, the PA is nominally a state structure run by a legislative assembly of elected officials.

Its murky and confusing, but my feeling is that is a result of the nacent nature of the Palestine Auhtority as a state structure. Were the Palestinians to achieve statehood, it is likely that the PLO would break into its various factions, who already compete for positions in the PA.

Fatah is the largest faction and so it usually leads the PLO, and consquently will likely lead the PA, if its candidate wins the election, if that happens.

[ 24 November 2004: Message edited by: Cueball ]


From: Out from under the bridge and out for a stroll | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
prowsej
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posted 24 November 2004 10:02 PM      Profile for prowsej   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Thanks. Correct me if I'm wrong. The PLO (and PNA, which is part of the PLO) has existed since the 60s. The PA is a creation of Oslo. Party representation is roughly similar in the PLO's Central Comittee and the PNA.

Are either Hammas or "Islamic Jihad" represented in either the PNA or PLO Central Committee currently? When was the last PNA election - 2000? How are members of the PLO Central Committee chosen?

This quickly becomes a convoluted alphabet soup!

quote:
The central committee of the Fatah movement decided in Gaza on Thursday that the posts of chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) and the president of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) would be merged.
(Source)

[ 24 November 2004: Message edited by: prowsej ]


From: Ottawa ON | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
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posted 24 November 2004 10:07 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Well, on the one hand that looks like a quite coup, on the other hand it looks like a coup that might not be so quite.
From: Out from under the bridge and out for a stroll | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged

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