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Author Topic: Rocket attack in Baghdad kills U.S. colonel
Kimura
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4490

posted 26 October 2003 02:59 PM      Profile for Kimura     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
an American soldier was killed in a rocket attack on a Baghdad hotel Sunday morning. CBC reports that it was a colonel. 15 other people were wounded. Paul Wolfowitz was in the building too, but he was unhurt.

the attackers jury-rigged the rocket launcher. it was disguised as a generator on a trailer. they set it to fire by timer, then fled. BBC has a picture of the launcher.

while i utterly deplore their cause, the resourcefulness of the attackers astounds me. they could have taken out the US Deputy Secretary of Defence, and they put themselves at minimal risk in the process. are we going to see more of this kind of warfare in the future?


From: Toronto | Registered: Sep 2003  |  IP: Logged
Polunatic
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3278

posted 26 October 2003 03:09 PM      Profile for Polunatic   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I wonder if this is the first war in which the brass stay in luxury hotels instead of on bases or military camps? Do you think they're getting a weekly rate or paying by the day?

Can you imagine General Patton calling for room service from the Sahara Sheraton?


From: middle of nowhere | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
beluga2
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3838

posted 26 October 2003 03:25 PM      Profile for beluga2     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
That's one nasty-looking weapon. Primitive but effective.

While I despise Wolfowitz with all my heart, I'm glad he wasn't hurt in this attack. I shudder at the type of violent revenge the neocons might unleash should one of their own be cut down.


From: vancouvergrad, BCSSR | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
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Babbler # 2534

posted 26 October 2003 04:27 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Patton, perhaps not, but Mountbatten, most definitely...

Those Iraqis are crafty indeed.


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 26 October 2003 04:42 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
U.S. Army Brig. Gen. Martin Dempsey says the attack likely took months to plan.

I seriously doubt that claim.

These attacks are too easy to make.

They are going to happen in Britain, Western Europe, and here pretty soon.

There is no point in denying what is happening. They are going to happen, and not just in Iraq.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
CMOT Dibbler
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Babbler # 4117

posted 26 October 2003 05:05 PM      Profile for CMOT Dibbler     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Who exactly are the Americans fighting? Bush says that their guerrillas opposing the American occupation are Baathist loyalists. Robert Fisk insists that they are part of a popular uprising against the American rule. Who's right and who's wrong?
From: Just outside Fernie, British Columbia | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
robbie_dee
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Babbler # 195

posted 26 October 2003 05:07 PM      Profile for robbie_dee     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
What do you think, CMOT?
From: Iron City | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Jacob Two-Two
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Babbler # 2092

posted 26 October 2003 05:36 PM      Profile for Jacob Two-Two     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I would say both, if pressed to guess. At first, probably more the former, but as the occupation goes on it becomes overwhelmingly the latter.
From: There is but one Gord and Moolah is his profit | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
CMOT Dibbler
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4117

posted 26 October 2003 05:40 PM      Profile for CMOT Dibbler     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I don't know. The resistance may have begun as a collection of "dead enders" but it has grown to include "ordinary" Iraqis. Regardless of who is making war on the Americans, I doubt this situation will end well.
From: Just outside Fernie, British Columbia | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
SHH
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1527

posted 26 October 2003 06:03 PM      Profile for SHH     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Here’s what an actual Iraqi has to say on the subject.

quote:
I heard some very distressful news today. Someone has been writing graffiti all over Baghdad threatening to kill children who accept the new schoolbags that are to be gifted to them by UNESCO for the new school season. Also warning that any hand waving to the infidel Americans will be cut.

Are these people sane? I mean what are they thinking? Is this our latest form of 'resistance'? Threatening our own children for getting some shiny new schoolbags. I am trying very hard to understand. This so called resistance is getting hated more and more by Iraqis everywhere. I'm sure this will only add to that scorn exponentially. They are losing any sympathy they may have had earlier. The terrorists have turned out to be MUCH dumber than I thought.


My emphasis.

[ 26 October 2003: Message edited by: SHH ]


From: Ex-Silicon Valley to State Saguaro | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
April Follies
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Babbler # 4098

posted 26 October 2003 06:14 PM      Profile for April Follies   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
And then again, if you read the blog of another Iraqi (who goes by Riverbend), Baghdad Burning, you get a very different picture. For instance:

quote:
Al-Sadr has been making waves in the south and Baghdad. He is frightening and I don’t think his influence should be underestimated. He easily has over a million followers (some say it’s up to 4 million) and they practically revere him. It’s not him personally that makes him so important with his followers, it’s the fact that he is the son of a famous Shi’a cleric who was assassinated in 1999. While the majority of the middle and upper class Iraqis want a secular government, Al-Sadr seems to resonate with the impoverished, currently jobless men in the south and in some of Baghdad’s slums.

From: Help, I'm stuck in the USA | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
SHH
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1527

posted 26 October 2003 07:59 PM      Profile for SHH     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Here’s another blogger from Basra. I found this a moving passage.
quote:
Because of all that, my dearest Iraq, I despise you. But please, my love and hate, understand my anger. I want you to stop answering my questions about the wasted childhood and youth by saying that these things will be forgotten, because if you do that again you will have to allow me to keep on despising you.
When I first read the post I thought she was talking about the US.

I imagine I’ll never understand the thoughts and feelings of the Iraqi people as all these changes are forced upon them. The complexity; the confusion; the confliction. Too much for me.

I emailed Riverbend with some questions. I also invited her to join us at babble. We shall see...

[ 26 October 2003: Message edited by: SHH ]


From: Ex-Silicon Valley to State Saguaro | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
April Follies
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4098

posted 26 October 2003 08:08 PM      Profile for April Follies   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Makes you wish everyone in the whole world could have a blog, doesn't it? Then we could really see what "the people" thought, in their own words.
From: Help, I'm stuck in the USA | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
SHH
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1527

posted 26 October 2003 08:43 PM      Profile for SHH     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Yes it does.

I wouldn’t be surprised if Blogs and this whole everybody-is-a-reporter development doesn’t go down in the history books as a very important and transforming happening. ‘Transparency’ is generally thought to the best protection against corruption. A couple-of-hundred-million self-styled and unedited (but seriously ‘fact-checked’) free-agent ‘reporters’ would seem likely to advance transparency to an important degree.


From: Ex-Silicon Valley to State Saguaro | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
Cart
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3154

posted 28 October 2003 03:50 PM      Profile for Cart     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
The Al Rasheed, which houses civilian occupation officials and U.S. military forces, is the downtown Baghdad district at the heart of the U.S.-led administration of Iraq, about 1.5 kilometres from the palace housing the coalition headquarters and the offices of the interim Iraqi Governing Council.

Doesn't this qualify as some sort of Geneva Convention violation? surrounding millitary targets with civilians?


From: Camp X-ray | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged

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