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Author Topic: RIP Edward W. Said
Mandos
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posted 25 September 2003 01:41 PM      Profile for Mandos   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/344410.html
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lagatta
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posted 25 September 2003 01:56 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
So sorry to learn of the death of such a thoughtful writer. Already, in his photo with his friend Daniel Barenboim earlier this year, Said looks very drawn and ill: http://www.guardian.co.uk/weekend/story/0,3605,928709,00.html
From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
scrabble
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posted 25 September 2003 02:07 PM      Profile for scrabble     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post

From: dappled shade in the forest | Registered: Jul 2002  |  IP: Logged
Mandos
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Babbler # 888

posted 25 September 2003 02:12 PM      Profile for Mandos   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
His last essay for the popular press:

http://weekly.ahram.org.eg/2003/652/op1.htm

Further essays: http://www.edwardsaid.org/


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Courage
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posted 25 September 2003 04:03 PM      Profile for Courage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post

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skdadl
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Babbler # 478

posted 25 September 2003 04:19 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Oh, no. Oh, no. Oh, I am so sorry.

He was a wonderful man. A wonderful man, and a good writer. As E.B. White said, It is not often ...


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
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Babbler # 2534

posted 25 September 2003 04:25 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Perhaps we can console ourselves a bit by reading this fine review essay by Said, on the urgency of humanistic understanding:
http://books.guardian.co.uk/review/story/0,12084,1010417,00.html

From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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Babbler # 478

posted 25 September 2003 05:16 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
That is splendid, lagatta, and it finishes me for the day.

Said's discussion of Auerbach moved me very much, and leaves me feeling very very ... lonely.

I suppose the danger in saying that the humanities have now sunk as low as they can go is that we will read (again) on tomorrow's front page that at one Ontario university or other, they've just sunk even further.

If anyone has the strength -- please learn why it matters to save your local arts faculty. Alternatively, if you're the last one in the building, please turn off the lights as you go.


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Blind_Patriot
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Babbler # 3830

posted 25 September 2003 05:21 PM      Profile for Blind_Patriot     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Terrible
From: North Of The Authoritarian Regime | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 25 September 2003 07:10 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
This is awful. I knew he had been terminally ill for a long time, but this still a shock and a great loss for all of us.

I'll miss his voice. It was the personification of dignity.


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DrConway
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Babbler # 490

posted 25 September 2003 08:27 PM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Crud.

I didn't even know he was ill. One by one the voices of old are fading away - the voices of people who have lived long enough and through some of the eras in which the worst kind of human behavior was witnessed worldwide. Dr. Israel Shahak, one of Dr. Said's compatriots, also died recently; he was old enough to have actually been in the Jewish ghettos in the 1940s.

Us young people have no direct experience with such things, such phenomena. The closest most of us probably get is a dim awareness of the cost that the Vietnam war levied on US society for a decade after it ended.


From: You shall not side with the great against the powerless. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
beluga2
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posted 26 September 2003 02:44 AM      Profile for beluga2     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I already said it in the other thread on his death, but I'll say it again:


From: vancouvergrad, BCSSR | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 26 September 2003 09:41 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Students of literature and literary theory, most especially those who are interested in Conrad and his contemporaries, will want to read the book that first brought Said wide attention, Beginnings, which dates from the early/mid-seventies.

In the welter of theoretical discussions of many kinds in those years, Said at first seemed yet another version of PoMo thinker. And maybe he was, maybe he was.

But as the essay (new intro to Orientalism) that lagatta has linked to above shows, he was in literary terms much more a classicist, a student of Poetics in the broadest and oldest sense, and his work for that reason mostly ages well -- as he did.

Many will also know of his avocation -- his love for European opera. I heard him give a lecture once on Aida that was so much fun. He started off doing the kind of careful deconstruction of the several relevant histories and biographies and social contexts -- of the opera itself and of its first performance, in Cairo -- that one would expect of a leading NAmerican critic of the seventies/eighties. But mid-way through, he turned into a just-plain fan, and that was the most fun.

Obviously, he really touched people, in person and in his writing. A wonderful life.


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marcy
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posted 26 September 2003 11:36 PM      Profile for marcy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Oh dear, I didn't know he was ill, either. I've used some of his work in my classes. He was an elegant and clear writer. It's a very great loss, indeed.
From: vancouver | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
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posted 27 September 2003 01:02 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I managed to track down Robert Fisk's eloquent commentary on Edward Said:

http://sf.indymedia.org/news/2003/09/1648326.php

(...) "The last time I saw Edward Said, I asked him to go on living. I knew about his leukaemia. He had often pointed out that he was receiving "state-of-the-art" treatment from a Jewish doctor and - despite all the trash that his enemies threw at him - he always acknowledged the kindness and honour of his Jewish friends, of whom Daniel Barenboim was among the finest.

Edward was dining at a buffet among his family in Beirut, frail but angry at Arafat's latest surrender in Palestine/Israel. And he answered my question like a soldier. "I'm not going to die," he said. "Because so many people want me dead."

On Wednesday night he died in a New York hospital, aged 67. (...)


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
SHH
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posted 27 September 2003 01:19 PM      Profile for SHH     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Hitchens knew him.
From: Ex-Silicon Valley to State Saguaro | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 27 September 2003 01:40 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Indeed, it should be no criticism of anyone to say that politics isn't their best milieu, especially if the political life has been forced upon them.

Indeed.

I should think that that line applies to millions of human beings world-wide, none of whom needs his/her head patted by the likes of Christopher Hitchens.

It must be most distressing to someone like Hitchens to watch someone like Said live his life out so nobly. Perhaps Said's example will bring Hitchens 'round -- but then again, probably not.


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al-Qa'bong
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posted 27 September 2003 07:11 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Christopher Hitchens couldn't carry Edward Said's pencil case.
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marcy
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posted 27 September 2003 07:49 PM      Profile for marcy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I'm certainly no fan of the new Chris (and find him relentlessly superior, annoying, snotty, and wrong) but somehow, reading his piece made me feel really sad. More so than reading Fisk. It just reminded me of how so much time has passed since so much went wrong and how precious voices such as Said's were and are. I guess the article reminded me of sitting on the floor of a pregnant friend's living room in 1982, watching the television blast into Vancouver images of the Isaelis pounding the crap out of Bierut. We were both in tears, perhaps realizing how that particular violence stood out symbolically for the end of something for which there would be nothing as a replacement.
From: vancouver | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
CMOT Dibbler
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Babbler # 4117

posted 27 September 2003 08:41 PM      Profile for CMOT Dibbler     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by marcy:
I'm certainly no fan of the new Chris (and find him relentlessly superior, annoying, snotty, and wrong) but somehow, reading his piece made me feel really sad. More so than reading Fisk. It just reminded me of how so much time has passed since so much went wrong and how precious voices such as Said's were and are. I guess the article reminded me of sitting on the floor of a pregnant friend's living room in 1982, watching the television blast into Vancouver images of the Isaelis pounding the crap out of Bierut. We were both in tears, perhaps realizing how that particular violence stood out symbolically for the end of something for which there would be nothing as a replacement.

I'm torn. Hitchens is one of my gurus. I agree with some of what he said during the war. However, I think he made a very bad mistake in throwing his wait behind the American war machine. Dosen't he relize that the Americans won't turn Iraq into a social democracy? What's wrong with him? Why is he behaving in this way!?


From: Just outside Fernie, British Columbia | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 27 September 2003 10:42 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
A sad day.
From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 29 September 2003 06:32 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Archive of Edward Said's Articles in Al-Ahram
From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Mandos
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 888

posted 29 September 2003 06:50 PM      Profile for Mandos   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
CBC radio on Sunday morning covered Edward Said's death. Guess whom they interviewed? Norman Specter! He had only met Edward Said once when he (Specter) was an undergraduate. Why interview someone who forcefully represents positions that Said spent a lifetime fighting? Couldn't they have gotten any of the hundreds of other people who knew him as a friend, or at least could be trusted not to insinuate things about him? Fine, Specter was respectful. But he still managed to twist Said's legacy.
From: There, there. | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged

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