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Author Topic: Understanding the Shi'a of Lebanon
al-Qa'bong
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posted 06 May 2003 07:21 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
With emphasis on the word, "understanding."
From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 28 May 2003 12:40 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
More from Lebanon: The softer side of jihad
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Smith
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posted 01 June 2003 06:02 PM      Profile for Smith     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
The second link is no longer working, but the first is interesting.

quote:
However, to this day, they have never forgotten their defeat, and their propaganda machine, and their lobbyists in Washington, DC and their allies in the major media of the US, have continued calling Hezbollah a "terrorist organization." As was said in a past presidential campaign, "Where's the Beef?" In truth, no evidence has been brought forward to prove that Hezbollah is a terrorist organization. They can lay claim to driving Israel out of Lebanon, putting up schools, hospitals, providing social assistance and helping keep Lebanon intact, especially in the south. But to this day, no one in the US Congress can show how they are a "terrorist organization",though these words are continually being mouthed by Bush and the Congress, as well as the clique of Wolfowitz, Perle, Feith, Cheney and now even by Powell.

Even the U.S. media plays into this stereotyping by not allowing anyone from Hezbollah or the Shi'a to appear on a major TV or radio network show; the newspapers rarely allow any statements from them either. Thus, the stereotypes are allowed to persist, much to the detriment of better international understanding.


I don't know enough about Hezbollah to comment, but this is very different from the view put forward by most of the American media. How are we defining "terrorist organization"? The term has been overused, IMHO, and should refer to people who attack civilians for the purpose of creating terror, not people who attack enemy armies using unusual techniques. I was quite disgusted by the use of the word "terrorist" during Operation "Iraqi Freedom," used to describe any Iraqi who dared to fight the invading American army.

So which is Hezbollah?

[ 01 June 2003: Message edited by: Smith ]


From: Muddy York | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 02 June 2003 12:50 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Given the dearth of information about Hezbollah, it's hard to make an accurate judgement. The link that no longer works was a Beirut Daily Star, article about a Hezbollah-operated hospital. The article pointed out that the hospital gives Christians (even former SLA fighters) priority in admittance and care over Muslims as an act of Muslim courtesy.

Another recent Daily Star article was quite critical of Hezbollah, saying that the organization has nothing do do any more now that they have liberated south Lebanon from the Israelis.

I heard the Lebanese-born scholar, As'ad AbuKhalil, in a radio interview say that Hezbollah has a broad mass appeal, and that its leader, Hassan Nasrallah, is one of the most popular figures not just in Lebanon, but throughout the Arab and Muslim world.

AbuKhalil claims that the accusations of "terrorist" directed at Hezbollah are just so much propaganda.


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 05 June 2003 02:11 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Hezbollah has ambulances, and apparently the Israelis attack them
quote:
Hezbollah blames Israel for blast in south Lebanon

An explosive device blew up Tuesday in an ambulance of the Lebanese Hezbollah movement near the border with Israel, seriously injuring the driver, police said.

Jihad Halaweh was struck in the stomach and feet when the device exploded as he turned on the ignition of the ambulance, which was parked on the main square of Kfarkilla in southern Lebanon, the sources said, cited by AFP.

The ambulance, bearing the insignia of Hezbollah's health services, was badly damaged as well.

Hezbollah issued a statement to blame Israel for the explosion, saying it was part of, "the repeated aggressions mounted by the Zionist enemy against Lebanon, its people, its water and its right"



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Ray Peterson
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posted 05 June 2003 10:15 AM      Profile for Ray Peterson   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Here's a little 411 on Hezbollah

quote:
What is Hezbollah?
Hezbollah is a Lebanese group of Shiite militants that has evolved into a major force in Lebanon's society and politics. It opposes the West, seeks to create a Muslim fundamentalist state modeled on Iran, and is a bitter foe of Israel. The group's name means “party of God.”

Is Hezbollah a terrorist group?


Yes. Hezbollah and its affiliates have planned or been linked to a lengthy series of terrorist attacks against America, Israel, and other Western targets. These attacks include:

* a series of kidnappings of Westerners, including several Americans, in the 1980s;
* the suicide truck bombings that killed more than 200 U.S. Marines at their barracks in Beirut, Lebanon, in 1983;
* the 1985 hijacking of TWA flight 847, which featured the famous footage of the plane's pilot leaning out of the cockpit with a gun to his head;
* and two major 1990s attacks on Jewish targets in Argentina—the 1992 bombing of the Israeli embassy (killing 29) and the 1994 bombing of a Jewish community center (killing 95).

Is Hezbollah sponsored by any states?
Yes, Iran and Syria. The group receives “substantial amounts of financial, training, weapons, explosives, political, diplomatic, and organizational aid from Iran and Syria,” the State Department reports. Hezbollah was founded as a catspaw for Iran, Middle East experts say. While Iran gave Hezbollah more funding and support in the 1980s than in the 1990s, it still often gives Hezbollah its orders and its ideological inspiration. And because Lebanon has been under Syrian control since 1990, Hezbollah could not operate in Lebanon without Syria's approval, Middle East experts say.

Does Hezbollah do other things besides terrorism?
Yes. Experts say Hezbollah is also an important player in Lebanon's politics, a key vehicle of Lebanese Shiite empowerment, and a major provider of social services to thousands of Lebanese Shiites.

How large is Hezbollah?
Its core consists of several thousand militants and activists, the U.S. government estimates.

Where does Hezbollah operate?
Its base is in Lebanon’s Shiite-dominated areas, including parts of Beirut, southern Lebanon, and the Bekaa Valley. In addition, U.S. intelligence reports say that Hezbollah cells operate in regions including Europe, Africa, South America, and North America. Despite Israel’s 2000 withdrawal from Lebanon, Hezbollah continues to shell Israeli forces at a disputed border area called Shebaa Farms.

Is Hezbollah a “terrorist group of global reach”?
So far, U.S. officials have resisted answering this question. In his September 20, 2001, speech to Congress, President Bush pledged that the U.S.-led war on terror “will not end until every terrorist group of global reach has been found, stopped and defeated.” Hezbollah’s cells outside the Middle East, its reported involvement in the January 2002 attempt to smuggle a boatload of arms to the Palestinian Authority, and its role in the 1992 and 1994 attacks in Argentina imply that it might meet the president’s definition, terrorism experts say. Moreover, in June 2002, Singapore accused Hezbollah of recruiting Singaporeans in a failed 1990s plot to attack U.S. and Israeli ships in the Singapore Straits. Hezbollah was also among the few terrorist groups that President Bush mentioned by name in his January 2002 State of the Union address.


[ 05 June 2003: Message edited by: Ray Peterson ]


From: Hinkley Hills | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
Ray Peterson
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posted 05 June 2003 10:27 AM      Profile for Ray Peterson   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
And here

quote:
It was not by cheer coincidence that Hezbollah turned into a struggle movement against the “Israeli” occupation. Because Hezbollah’s ideological ideals sees no legitimacy for the existence of “Israel” a matter that elevates the contradictions to the level of existence. And the conflict becomes one of legitimacy that is based on religious ideals. The seed of resistance is also deep in the ideological beliefs of Hezbollah, a belief that found its way for expression against the Zionist occupation of Lebanon. And that is why we also find the slogan of the liberation of Jerusalem rooted deeply in the ideals of Hezbollah. Another of its ideals is the establishment of the an Islamic Government.

From: Hinkley Hills | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
WingNut
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posted 05 June 2003 10:36 AM      Profile for WingNut   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Do you have sources? Or is this all in your head?
From: Out There | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Ray Peterson
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posted 05 June 2003 10:49 AM      Profile for Ray Peterson   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Do you have sources? Or is this all in your head?

Yes I have sources, but what's with the attitude ?

terrorismQ&A


and here

english homepage


From: Hinkley Hills | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
WingNut
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posted 05 June 2003 11:32 AM      Profile for WingNut   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Attitude? What attitude? You posted quotes without links. As much as we would like sources I am sure the authors would like credit.
From: Out There | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Ray Peterson
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posted 05 June 2003 11:37 AM      Profile for Ray Peterson   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Just the " Or is this all in your head " comment. Seemed confrontational.
From: Hinkley Hills | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 11 June 2003 12:17 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
WASHINGTON: Hizbullah’s potential for promoting an anti-American Iraqi resistance movement has caught the attention of counterterrorism experts and policy analysts here.
Some American officials believe Hizbullah’s resistance credentials could be used to drag the US into a complicated guerrilla war in Iraq, helping relieve Damascus and Tehran of pressure from hawks in the Bush administration.

That's the view of some US administrators. It looks different from Hizbullah's perspective:

quote:
Hassan Ezzieddine, head of Hizbullah’s media department, said that the attacks on US forces in Iraq were “the reaction of the Iraqi people to American occupation.”
“Hizbullah’s position is based on what the Iraqi people want, and we believe that the nature and history of the Iraqi people is to reject all foreign occupation,” he said.
As for actual Hizbullah involvement in any emerging resistance, Ezzieddine said that the party’s experience against the Israeli Army in South Lebanon was no secret and could be copied by anyone.
“Any nation can make use of our techniques if they have the will, the steadfastness, faith and desire to live in dignity,” he said.
It also appears that Hizbullah is taking pains to avoid being accused of meddling in Iraqi affairs to the extent that the four or five Al-Manar correspondents reporting from Iraq are all Iraqi nationals rather than Lebanese.

Beirut Daily Star


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged

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