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Author Topic: Democratic Qatar
Wilf Day
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Babbler # 3276

posted 08 April 2003 12:17 PM      Profile for Wilf Day     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Drew Fagan, in this morning's Globe and Mail, is right. (Waiting And Waiting For The Doha Deal). Qatar is now the symbol of both the US military unilateral bid for a democratic Iraq, and of the WTO's Doha round.

How democratic. The Emir of Qatar is an absolute monarch. Qatar has no legislature or political parties. An Advisory Council of 35 members is nominated from among landowners, farmers, businessmen, and notables for their good judgement and competence. It comments on proposed laws, but it can neither change the proposals nor propose laws on its own.

http://www.undp-pogar.org/countries/qatar/legislature.html

or maybe it's 41 members:
http://xrules.com/qatar/gcc/qatar.htm

or 30 members
http://www.austarab.com.au/Qatar/Qatar_constitution.html

But they don't count, so who's counting?


From: Port Hope, Ontario | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
Markbo
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Babbler # 124

posted 08 April 2003 06:28 PM      Profile for Markbo     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Qatar is moving towards a democracy, they're monarch has promised to be there in a decade or so.

Instant utopia isn't reality.

Did you see the 60 minutes on Qatar? They are doing what other oil rich arab countries should be doing. They are reinvesting oil profits into education so their country will be able to diversify in the future. They soon will have one of the best Universities in the Middle East with Universities from all over the world maintaining a presence.

Qatar has done more for women's rights than other Arab Countries. The wife of the Monarch addressed the U.N. and has become a role model for young girls in that country and a symbol of what they can accomplish.

I don't know but Qatar sounded like the best place in the Middle east. You should concentrate on Kuwaits refusal of allowing women to vote.

Qatar allows women to vote but only in municipal elections.


From: Windsor | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
DrConway
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Babbler # 490

posted 08 April 2003 07:14 PM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Did you see the 60 minutes on Qatar? They are doing what other oil rich arab countries should be doing. They are reinvesting oil profits into education so their country will be able to diversify in the future.

Hasn't Iran been doing more or less the same thing? Even though the Ayatollah took over in 1979, I don't believe Iran abandoned education by any means. I know that the University of Tehran is quite modern and up-to-date at least as far as mathematics and the sciences go - one of my calculus professors was from there and she is a most excellent professor.


From: You shall not side with the great against the powerless. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 08 April 2003 07:16 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Yep, you're right. In fact, from what I understand from Iranian ex-pats, one of the good things (few good things, in my opinion) about the revolution is that more and more people are educated, and the value of WOMEN'S education has become much more widely recognized and acted upon. Women are apparently better educated in Iran now than ever before when they were "western" under the Shah.

Of course, I have no stats for this - I just know what I've heard from Iranian friends. And most of them were no fans of the revolutionary government either.

[ 08 April 2003: Message edited by: Michelle ]


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
jeff house
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posted 08 April 2003 07:41 PM      Profile for jeff house     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Basically, this same argument was made during the regime of the Shah of Iran:

quote:
Qatar has done more for women's rights than other Arab Countries. The wife of the Monarch addressed the U.N. and has become a role model for young girls in that country and a symbol of what they can accomplish.

It was repeatedly claimed that the Empress Farah Diba was a role model for all Iranian women, etc. etc. But read the quote, above: how, exactly is it that an Empress shows what girls can "accomplish"? It more clearly shows the advantages of marrying right and coming from aristocratic stock.


From: toronto | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Elemennntal
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Babbler # 3947

posted 09 April 2003 01:52 AM      Profile for Elemennntal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
They are doing what other oil rich arab countries should be doing. They are reinvesting oil profits into education so their country will be able to diversify in the future. They soon will have one of the best Universities in the Middle East with Universities from all over the world maintaining a presence.

They're following in the footsteps of the UAE - though the UAE isn't the perfect Arab country by any means. Still, a lot of neighbouring countries have been watching and waiting to see how Dubai in particular turns out.

The main reason Qatar have been getting the 'pretty recognition' is because of centcom's presence and the 'favours' Qatar have been giving the US/UK (a la Saudi style during 1991).


From: Dubai, UAE --- yeah THERE. | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged

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