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Author Topic: Spy-Satellite photos of Iraqi WMDs released
writer
editor emeritus
Babbler # 2513

posted 15 March 2003 12:05 PM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Shocking Images
From: tentative | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Whazzup?
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1471

posted 15 March 2003 01:00 PM      Profile for Whazzup?     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
In the West, we make jokes about Saddam's WMD.

In Iraqi Kurdistan, they beg the UN to send them gas masks.

Humorless folk, those Kurds, wouldn't you say? You wouldn't suppose they know something that we don't?


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schizm
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posted 15 March 2003 01:02 PM      Profile for schizm     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Hilarious , but clear and absolute proof that some people have altogether too much time on their hands!
From: Ontario | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
Whazzup?
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Babbler # 1471

posted 16 March 2003 10:26 AM      Profile for Whazzup?     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
More hilarity from Iraqi Kurdistan:

CBC reports that Kurdish officials request smallpox vaccinations


From: Under the Rubble | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
writer
editor emeritus
Babbler # 2513

posted 09 April 2003 02:27 PM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Now that we've seen the present state of Iraq's defence capability, I thought it might be time to revisit this link.

WMDs? I guess the Ba'ath party is saving them for a time when they are really, really needed.

Manufactured nuclear capabilities, empty claims of scud launches, invented mobile chemical labs. Why not throw in Godzilla?

Hussein's regime was (is) terrible, and did inexcusable things to the people of Iraq. But his government clearly didn't pose the threat the U.S. claimed it did in order to justify this invasion.


From: tentative | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Mycroft_
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posted 09 April 2003 02:31 PM      Profile for Mycroft_     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
What happened to those chemical tipped missiles the US claimed they found earlier this week?

Another report disappears in the memory hole. Followup? Why would the US media do followup?


From: Toronto | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
writer
editor emeritus
Babbler # 2513

posted 09 April 2003 02:36 PM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Actually, they're saying it'll take a few days to do proper testing of them and the drums the military thinks might be filled with chemical agents.

Some media commentators in the U.S. are even acknowledging that it'll be important to get independent confirmation, after a transparent process that leaves no possibility that there's been tampering with or manufacturing of evidence.

There's enough foreign press around that this issue won't be allowed to drop.


From: tentative | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
josh
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posted 09 April 2003 02:38 PM      Profile for josh     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
As I've noted elsewhere, the whole WMD claim was total bullshit. The UN inspections had worked to the point where you can see the results in the "fight" the Iraqis put up. They were so pathetic that they didn't even destroy the bridges over the rivers, which would have slowed the US advance. Believe me, if they had such "weapons," they would have used them. That they may have some chemicals or agents, doesn't mean they are "weapons."

The war had nothing to do with WMD, and everything to do with regime change, oil and a hubristic attempt to remake the middle east.


From: the twilight zone between the U.S. and Canada | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 09 April 2003 02:47 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
There's enough foreign press around that this issue won't be allowed to drop.

Especially since the U.S. Defence Dep't just used up all its goodwill with any self-respecting member of the international press corps, including any self-respecting U.S. journalist, for, oh, let's say the next twenty years, by targeting journalists in Baghdad.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Doug
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posted 09 April 2003 06:12 PM      Profile for Doug   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
The drums turned out to be pesticide and I haven't seen anything about the missiles since they were first reported.
From: Toronto, Canada | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
writer
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Babbler # 2513

posted 09 April 2003 09:51 PM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Absolutely, skdadl. I think we'll see a lot more follow-up with this invasion - perhaps not with the U.S. mainstream media, but with journalists from everywhere else on earth. Nothing like what happened with Afghanistan (and too many other countries that drop off the radar once there's a new Survivors episode to dwell on).

Doug, there's been several different batches of drums and suspect powder. Everything that has been tested so far has turned out to be something other than chemical weapons, let alone the components needed to make chemical weapons.

That said, the substances in the warheads and latest collection of drums (discovered several days ago) have not yet been announced. I heard that the warheads are particularly hard to test, and need a very secure facility before they're opened up.

I've got to say, one of the drums that I saw - shown in a dugout, with a "gas" sign posted in front - was clearly not sealed. There was no cap on the pouring spout. Makes me think the claims are somewhat dubious from the get-go.

[ 09 April 2003: Message edited by: writer ]


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'lance
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posted 09 April 2003 10:15 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Only National Public Radio ever seemed to have a first-hand report on those gas-tipped missiles. Everyone else, for example Reuters, just quoted them. That was Monday. I wonder if we'll ever hear more about this story.
From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
writer
editor emeritus
Babbler # 2513

posted 09 April 2003 11:28 PM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Again, I think you will. I remember that, last week, one CNN scroll at the bottom of the screen referred to Hans Blix expressing a keen interest in whether the "coalition" forces will find what they claimed to come into that country for.

There are a lot of different people, in a lot of different (and influential) places, who have a lot of different reasons why they won't let this stuff go by without a peep.

quote:
In another incident, the US military investigated on Tuesday the possibility of the presence of mustard gas near the central city of Najaf after five soldiers developed what they thought were blisters while on duty there. However, it turned out that they were suffering from heat exhaustion, not exposure to chemical agents. 

Will US fabricate WMD evidence?
Al Jazeera


[ 09 April 2003: Message edited by: writer ]


From: tentative | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
writer
editor emeritus
Babbler # 2513

posted 10 April 2003 09:53 AM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Ah yes, those pesky UN inspectors:

quote:
Meanwhile, UN chief weapons inspector Hans Blix said that finding weapons of mass destruction does not seem to be high on the list of U.S. war objectives.

"I think the Americans started the war thinking there were some [prohibited weapons]. I think they now believe less in that possibility," Mr. Blix told the Spanish daily El Pais.

Mohamed ElBaradei, the IAEA director-general, said that if the U.S.-led coalition finds evidence of weapons of mass destruction, this must be verified by the UN.

That's the only way to make sure the claims are credible, Mr. ElBaradei said through a spokesman.


The Globe and Mail


From: tentative | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 12 April 2003 02:12 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
As for those mustard gas- and sarin-tipped missiles... according to the National Public Radio Ombudsman, "the Pentagon backed off and would not confirm the report." (scroll down)

quote:
But on specifics, listeners have mentioned two stories in which NPR seems to have failed to follow up.

Weapons of Mass Destruction... or Pesticides?

First, there was a John Burnett story that reported that US military intelligence believed that chemical weapons had been found.

Burnett's story first aired on Morning Edition on Monday, April 7:

I just heard from a top military official here with the 1st Marine Division who says that he received information today over the intelligence net that commanders all throughout this theater read the first solid confirmed existence of chemical weapons by the Iraqi army. He says a relatively large amount, perhaps 20 medium-range rockets, were found with warheads containing sarin, a nerve gas, and mustard gas, which is a blister agent. They had not been fired. They were captured, he said, by the 101st Airborne, which was going in behind the Army. This would have been somewhere southwesterly of Baghdad outside of the actual capital.

Many other journalistic organizations repeated the allegation and credited NPR with breaking the story. But later that day, the Pentagon backed off and would not confirm the report. NPR reported that there was some confusion between the discovery of rockets and the discovery of a number of metal drums that turned out to contain pesticides.

NPR clarified that difference in a report filed by Jennifer Ludden on All Things Considered that same day:

SIEGEL: Hmm. Now there are reports that the U.S. may have found -- and I stress 'may have found' -- chemical weapons. What do you know about that?

LUDDEN: Well, earlier today, NPR's John Burnett was told by a senior Marine Corps commander that U.S. forces had discovered a number of rockets with warheads containing chemical weapons. That report has not been confirmed by the Pentagon. However, U.S. officials have cited the discovery of suspicious chemicals apparently in 50-gallon drums that are in a warehouse along the Euphrates River southwest of Baghdad. They're not calling it a smoking gun. They say the contents of the barrels are being analyzed, and it could be days before it's known what's in them.

But neither Morning Edition nor All Things Considered went back to the story. That left a lot of listeners with the impression that NPR was eager for the scoop, but less eager to stay on the story. NPR left its largest audiences wondering what happened.


So: mysterious drums, but no rockets with mysterious chemicals in them. Typical wartime misinformation (if it was actually disinformation, it was unsuccessful -- the story was reported, but never really "took").


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged

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