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Author Topic: Iran: Worst place in world for speech
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 03 March 2003 08:11 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Iran's rule of (arbitrary) law

quote:
A new UN human rights delegation has handed Iran the dubious distinction of the worst place in the world for free-speech. Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson reports for Knight Ridder that a five-member team with the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention just spent nearly two weeks examining Iran's judicial and penal systems. The team's conclusion is that authorities routinely jail dissidents for expressing their views, with a zeal not to be found anywhere else in the world.

It's so true. And the article doesn't even get into the lovely stuff that happens to those prisoners behind the bars.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
'larry'
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3504

posted 05 March 2003 02:57 AM      Profile for 'larry'     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
It seems like Mother Jones misinterpreted the article a bit. The Knight Ridder linked to (and quoted) by MJ here says:
"The Iranian government imprisons people for expressing their views on a scale unmatched by any other country yet examined, according to the first human rights delegation to visit Iran in seven years."
And,
"The panel has conducted finding missions to Bahrain, Bhutan, China, Indonesia, Mexico, Nepal, Peru, and Vietnam. It also has visited Australia, Romania, and the United Kingdom to look into the handling of ''unauthorized arrivals,'' immigrants, and asylum-seekers."
So Iran isn't necessarily the worst in the world for free speech, but it isn't doing very good.

[ 05 March 2003: Message edited by: 'larry' ]


From: Kitchener | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 05 March 2003 06:37 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Good point. I didn't pick up on that.

I would just say that "isn't doing very good" is a vast understatement. What goes on in that country is unbelievable when it comes to their dissidents.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
'larry'
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3504

posted 05 March 2003 10:26 AM      Profile for 'larry'     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I didn't mean it as a brush off. That's a huge problem in Iran, particularly when it looked like some things might be getting better.
From: Kitchener | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
LionKeeper
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3728

posted 05 March 2003 03:07 PM      Profile for LionKeeper     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I would have to agree with you guys on this topic. However, I think that we should look at it from a different perspective as well. Let’s compare Iran to China (Mao) which is about 50 years old along with the United States that is over 200 years old, in terms of current political systems.

Iran is a newly incepted system of Islamic democracy which is going through reforms and will continue to do so. My opinion is based on past governments of the world and the trends that are displayed by history, and the direction we are headed towards in the future. For the twenty-odd years that the political system has existed in Iran along with the world wide embargo’s it has faced I think that it is more likely to achieve the state of “normality” (whatever that means) much faster than the process that is taking place in China or the almost 150 years it took our neighbors to the south. There are many alive today that went through the civil rights movement they understand that reforms take time.

As a footnote to this, we (Canadians) forget what our treatment of Native Indians was and to some extent still is like in this country, view some U.N. reports over the last ten years and you will see that we are not perfect ourselves.

I don’t think that there is one country out there that did not violate human rights to get to where it is today. I am not justifying any abuses out there rather I am demonstrating the relativity of human abuses in countries as it relates to the time it takes them to be considered reformed and an active internationally accepted government along with their system used to administer the country.


From: The Lion's Den | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
DrConway
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 490

posted 23 August 2003 06:51 PM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Iranian Revolution Turned Against Women Who Support(ed) It

quote:
MONTREAL (CUP) -- She walked into a public square in Tehran last March, doused herself with gasoline and set herself aflame. The last words of Dr. Homa Darabi, Iranian university professor and activist against the Islamic regime, were, "Death to dictatorship! Long live freedom!"

In 1979, a revolution in Iran succeeded in bringing down the monarchy of the Shah. Soon afterwards, the exiled Ayatollah Khomeini, who had led the revolution from afar, returned to establish the Islamic Republic of Iran.

Inspired by hopes for democracy, economic prosperity for all classes, gender equality and a leadership that would not allow Iranian culture to be swallowed up by Western values, many Iranian women joined the 1978-'79 rebellion against the rule of the Shah.


I know it's an old article, but it gave me some food for thought especially given what's happened since 1995 (when the article was printed).


From: You shall not side with the great against the powerless. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged

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