babble home
rabble.ca - news for the rest of us
today's active topics


Post New Topic  Post A Reply
FAQ | Forum Home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» babble   » right brain babble   » humanities & science   » Perfidious Albion

Email this thread to someone!    
Author Topic: Perfidious Albion
rasmus
malcontent
Babbler # 621

posted 11 August 2003 12:33 AM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Mark Curtis exposes the fallacy that Britain is a force for democracy and human rights in Web of Deceit, says Caroline Lucas

quote:
Web of Deceit: Britain's Real Role in the World
by Mark Curtis
256pp, Vintage, £7.99

Recent revelations will have made unsettling reading for those who still believe in Britain's essentially benign approach to world affairs: evidence of British collusion with loyalist paramilitary groups in Northern Ireland engaging in "targeted assassinations" of suspected IRA members, for example, and the mounting anger over the way in which the government not only doctored intelligence reports on weapons of mass destruction, but also misled the House of Commons, and indeed the whole country, over the nature of the threat posed by Saddam Hussein.

In his brilliant and deeply disturbing new book, Mark Curtis demonstrates that these cannot be brushed aside as isolated cases, and delivers a powerful challenge to the notion that Britain's foreign policy is basically benevolent: that it promotes democracy, peace and human rights. The truth, according to Curtis, is that Britain supports terrorism. Indeed, "violating international law has become as British as afternoon tea".

But if New Labour has raised hypocrisy and double standards to the level of a new art form, ("never in history has there been such a gap between government claims and the reality of policy"), the route they are pursuing is hardly a new one. Curtis convincingly shows that contempt for international law has passed easily from Conservative to Labour, and from the colonial era to the present. By imposing regime change in Iraq, for example, Tony Blair is not so much following the US as continuing a national tradition.



From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
beluga2
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3838

posted 11 August 2003 04:35 AM      Profile for beluga2     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Recent revelations will have made unsettling reading for those who still believe in Britain's essentially benign approach to world affairs

You mean there's still people who actually believe such tripe? Amazing.


From: vancouvergrad, BCSSR | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
malcontent
Babbler # 621

posted 11 August 2003 10:33 AM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
To me, the significance of the book and the article is not what they say, which is not new, but that such views appear to be becoming respectable.
From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged

All times are Pacific Time  

Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic    Move Topic    Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
Hop To:

Contact Us | rabble.ca | Policy Statement

Copyright 2001-2008 rabble.ca