babble home
rabble.ca - news for the rest of us
today's active topics


Post New Topic  Post A Reply
FAQ | Forum Home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» babble   » walking the talk   » babblers helping babblers   » Computer trouble!

Email this thread to someone!    
Author Topic: Computer trouble!
Cartman
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7440

posted 10 January 2006 01:21 AM      Profile for Cartman        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
My sony notebook (one whole year old) is screwed after spending eight frickin' hours at the office completing a paper today. Now, when I try to email the file to my other one for printing, the computer will not boot past the "VAIO Intel Inside" point. And no, I did not yet save the changes to a flash drive.

My wife knows how to fix this, but she is not here (cell turned off too) and I need the file for tomorrow. Anyone know how to get this thing going? I think she keeps hitting some key while it is booting up?

Damn SONY!

[ 25 January 2006: Message edited by: audra trower williams ]


From: Bring back Audra!!!!! | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
Cartman
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7440

posted 10 January 2006 01:25 AM      Profile for Cartman        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Whew! It fired up. Piece of crap. I am so tired of spending bank on computers.
From: Bring back Audra!!!!! | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
Fidel
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5594

posted 10 January 2006 03:03 AM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
If it ever happens again, and I suspect it might well with Windows ...

TRy tapping the F8 key on bootup about once a second and don't let up until you see the advanced startup menu. he system looks for this key tap well before Windows gets a chance to load. You'll know you're there when you see safemode and safemode w networking. Safemode with networking loads the smallest footprint of OS and helper files possible plus your NIC driver if you want to connect to the inet. Once you're there, if Windows seems slow to respond or not working, I'd say you have unwanted third party software at the source of the problem. In which case, it sucks to be you. But then you have other options if you can find the Windows CD.

If you have the Windows operating system files CD, then you have other options to get to the "recovery console" and run a chkdsk /r to possibly fix broken files and sectors on your hard drive that could be problematic. You can also do a system restore from the command prompt. I think you'd enter: %systemroot%\system32\restore\rstrui - press the enter key and choose a date when there was last a snapshot of your files. ie any of the bolded dates on the calendar and preferably before todays date.

Or if that doesn't work, try dirty install of Windows or even a parallel install in order to recover some stuff. If you end up looking at this option, you have to be careful because even a parallel install with overwrite stuff outside the Windows directory structure, like email if you're using MS Outlook. You'll boot to the OS disk and either install Windows in the default path provided, or you can install Windows to another directory path of your choosing. Just don't delete any partitions or format the drive because you'll wipe out everything you were hoping to retrieve. In the case of a parallel install, choose the largest default c:\ partition mentioned as a number of MB's in size as the target for Windows, not any smaller ones in the neighborhood of 8 MB or so. After installing WIndows in a second directory structure off of the root directory, or c:\WinXp as an alternative to the default c:\Windows path provided, you can reboot without the disk in and the system will ask you which of two Windows installations it should load. Aha! You'll choose the super-sneaky parallel one you just installed in the ie. c:\WinXP folder. Again, this is a last option in case you can't get to safemode or recovery console to at least run a chkdsk /r on your drive. When it asks you to enter admin passwd on booting to disk and choosing recovery console in order to run a chkdsk /r, and can't get past the administrator password, there is a way around that.

edited to add:
If you didn't want to over-write MS Outlook and subsequent mail folders during a dirty or parallel install of Windows, see if you can bypass installing MS Outlook by choosing manual install of Windows and de-select Outlook as an install option. I don't know if it's that's possible. Anyway, some mail could still be stored on the inbound mail server at your ISP. There, you can't say I didn't try to help you after you didn't need it.

[ 10 January 2006: Message edited by: Fidel ]


From: Viva La Revolución | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
Cartman
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7440

posted 10 January 2006 11:56 AM      Profile for Cartman        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
There, you can't say I didn't try to help you after you didn't need it.

Thanx Fidel! I think my next laptop is going to be a really cheap one. I have purchased too many expensive ones that pooched out too soon. This particular Sony was by far the worst one. Meh, I believe I read a thread before Xmas stating that they contain some sort of spyware anyways so whatever.

Any thoughts on what a person might want to buy?


From: Bring back Audra!!!!! | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
Gir Draxon
leftist-rightie and rightist-leftie
Babbler # 3804

posted 25 January 2006 05:41 AM      Profile for Gir Draxon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Fidel:
Once you're there, if Windows seems slow to respond or not working, I'd say you have unwanted third party software at the source of the problem.

Unwanted 3rd Party Software. LOL.

If it's loading in safe mode, it's most likely malware. And not just your run-of-the-mill spyware, but something pretty serious. If you experience that, then backup your absolutely essential documents and then reformat. It would probably be faster and easier to do that than to put in the time and effort of removing something like that.


From: Arkham Asylum | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7791

posted 25 January 2006 09:24 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I recall that the last time this computer crashed, I had about 28 windows opened, in addition to Outlook Express. Is there a limit as to how many open windows WinXP can handle? I think a good half of my open windows were threads from babble I was following.
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Michael Watkins
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 11256

posted 25 January 2006 12:35 PM      Profile for Michael Watkins   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Cartman:
Any thoughts on what a person might want to buy?

I will never buy Japanese designed machines - no Sony, NEC, Toshiba. Eons ago Toshiba was best of breed; now, something simple and standard is the way to go. Dell or perhaps Gateway (no experience with the latter) and possibly Compaq. I tend to lean Dell for laptops and I buy the extra warranty - has always been worth it.


From: Vancouver Kingway - Democracy In Peril | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7791

posted 25 January 2006 12:48 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Isn't Dell a *major* contributor to the Republicans and GW? I read that last year on a mailing list I sub to.

ETA: Bush Contributors Exposed

Dell Computers executive Michael Dell has also played a big part in the Bush campaign. He’s personally donated $250,000 to the RNC, and his company’s given has swung heavily to Republican organizations--$353,000 vs $145,549 for Democratic groups. Dell has also been a very public supporter of Bush, lending his name to the campaign in several published letters and editorials.

Note: Al Gore had a lock on high-tech contributors, but they seem to have swung en masse to the Republicans (see below).

Silicon Battleground

"When Gore said the stock market was like playing 'roulette,' it was the kiss of death," says a Democratic political consultant who raised money for Gore in Silicon Valley. "Why is he dissing the stock market? It makes everyone think he doesn't understand the New Economy, that he's big government all over again." No such fears with George W. Bush, who crowed to a high-tech crowd, "If I am president, I will always take the side of... private initiative over federal regulation." His rhetoric cheered high-tech businessmen like John Chambers of Cisco Systems (No. 31, $582,933), Michael Dell of Dell Computer in Austin (No. 104, $328,000), and Valley titan and former Netscape CEO James Barksdale (No. 252, $212,000).

[ 25 January 2006: Message edited by: Boom Boom ]


From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Gir Draxon
leftist-rightie and rightist-leftie
Babbler # 3804

posted 25 January 2006 12:57 PM      Profile for Gir Draxon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Boom Boom:
Isn't Dell a *major* contributor to the Republicans and GW? I read that last year on a mailing list I sub to.

Michael Dell probably supports the Republican party because the Dell corporation outsources some of their tech support to India.

[ 25 January 2006: Message edited by: Gir Draxon ]

[ 25 January 2006: Message edited by: Gir Draxon ]


From: Arkham Asylum | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Stargazer
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6061

posted 25 January 2006 02:03 PM      Profile for Stargazer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Whew! It fired up. Piece of crap. I am so tired of spending bank on computers

Cartman that rocks!

Buy a Mac, forget Winblows.


From: Inside every cynical person, there is a disappointed idealist. | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
Michael Watkins
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 11256

posted 25 January 2006 02:06 PM      Profile for Michael Watkins   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Boom Boom - thanks for the link. I've not looked at the politics of hardware tech, more or less assuming that most of them are on the republican side of the ledger.

If you want to buy a politically correct PC, good luck. Perhaps its best to buy one that meets needs and is likely to hold up, and use the tool to fight against that which you don't approve

From the link - "Pro-initiative, anti-regulation" says Bush - that's such a load of crap. DMCA, patents, privacy invasion, govt purchasing scandals - the Bush admin is poking its nose everywhere with intrusive legislation and practices.


From: Vancouver Kingway - Democracy In Peril | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
Michael Watkins
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 11256

posted 25 January 2006 02:08 PM      Profile for Michael Watkins   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Stargazer:
Buy a Mac, forget Winblows.

Better yet, buy a generic machine and run a free operating system such as Linux, FreeBSD, and free, open source, software.

I do next to nothing on Windows now... my primary machine runs Unix only.


From: Vancouver Kingway - Democracy In Peril | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
Cartman
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7440

posted 25 January 2006 03:00 PM      Profile for Cartman        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Buy a Mac, forget Winblows.
I almost missed the Winblows.

I am very tempted to switch. I worry about whether there will be compatibility issues though (i.e. Powerpoint, WordPerfect, Dreamweaver, Endnote, STATA, Stat Transfer etc.). OTOH, I sure hear a lot of good things from Mac users.


From: Bring back Audra!!!!! | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
DrConway
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 490

posted 25 January 2006 04:07 PM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Speaking of "oh shit", here's one for you folks.

I got an Athlon64 3700+ just last week, and got the board and power supply a few days back. I used the same case that used to hold my AthlonXP 2500+, and just swapped power supplies.

Everything looked great until it was time to hit the power switch. I press the button nervously, and...

CLUNK.

That was the power supply's automatic short-circuit protection kicking it off to prevent me from blowing up about $400 worth of equipment.

After a few minutes of essentially ineffective messing about I gave it up as a bad job and set the case aside for later. Yesterday night I went back to it, and I got the notion to loosen the motherboard screws a bit.

Bingo, Voila, Yay.

I think the screws were pushing some of the motherboard's solder joints against the case, which would short them.

So, note to all - be aware that when the manual warns you about overtightening the screws, they really do know what the h e double hockey sticks they're talking about.


From: You shall not side with the great against the powerless. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Gir Draxon
leftist-rightie and rightist-leftie
Babbler # 3804

posted 25 January 2006 04:24 PM      Profile for Gir Draxon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Watkins:

Better yet, buy a generic machine and run a free operating system such as Linux, FreeBSD, and free, open source, software.


Learning Linux is a hobby of mine. So if you use your computer as more of a tool, then you might want to take the open source evangelism with a grain of salt. I know that there is no way in hell I would have been able to run linux when I used my computer primarily for school. My use is limited to my spare computer when I have a few hours to kill trying to get things working...

From: Arkham Asylum | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7791

posted 25 January 2006 04:40 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Quote: If you want to buy a politically correct PC, good luck. Perhaps its best to buy one that meets needs and is likely to hold up, and use the tool to fight against that which you don't approve

I don't know why, but I giggled when I read this.


From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Michael Watkins
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 11256

posted 25 January 2006 06:50 PM      Profile for Michael Watkins   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Gir Draxon:
Learning Linux is a hobby of mine. So if you use your computer as more of a tool, then you might want to take the open source evangelism with a grain of salt.

edit: Whether one can use a machine running Linux or Unix as an OS depends a lot on their requirements but for the vast majority of users, there are practical, if not excellent, open source solutions out there, free for the taking. Office automation / personal productivity / application development / network infrastructure / web / internet / scientific computing - you name it, there are open source solutions for almost every need.

The big down side is that, generally speaking, you'll have to make an investment in time to gain some knowledge before this big world of free software is available to you.

Certainly using *nix is a less than 'plug and play' experience, however for those interested in being free from software tyranny (or cost), its a viable option.

One day, firing up a fully funtional *nix box from blank disk to usable system will be easier, but for now one needs to be a bit of an adventurer. While some of the Linux distributions are easier than others to get going, none will yet appeal to those who need hand-holding the entire way.

Just the same, if someone has a little time, the inclination to learn, and is unafraid of trying new things, then investing the effort to learn to live with *nix alone will deliver long term benefits.

(especially true for those taking a technical / computing direction in school)

[ 25 January 2006: Message edited by: Michael Watkins ]


From: Vancouver Kingway - Democracy In Peril | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 25 January 2006 09:21 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh, this thread!

Okay, Cartman, I found it. But no, I didn't change your thread title. Audra did. You can tell by the edit tag at the bottom of the first post.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Brian White
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 8013

posted 25 January 2006 11:47 PM      Profile for Brian White   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I would definitely recommend to anybody with a computer and a cable internet connection to get a copy of damn small linux and a copy of knoppix. Knoppix Version 3.7 works on older computers and version 4 and up works on the newer ones.
I leant a damn small cd to one of my friends recently when her hard drive burnt out.
Damn small has only a hundred megs or less on it and even though she couldnt do a whole lot of work without a harddrive, she could still browse the web quickly and answer all her web based email.
Damn small allows you to download applications straight into the computer ram and install them there I just downloaded and ran games when I tried that and it works on any computer i have tried it on. Knoppix did not work in the one with the burnt out harddrive but it is amazing on the newer computers and I have used it to save data for people many times.
Brian

From: Victoria Bc | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
DrConway
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 490

posted 27 January 2006 12:15 PM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I would like to take a moment and recommend Memtest86 for people who want to make sure their memory is working okay. Bad memory can cause errors in Windows and otherwise stuff things up. I once had Windows act like the hard drive ate itself, which was actually just bad RAM. That meant I'd taken my AthlonXP 2100+ out of commission for three months for no reason.

In addition if you have a very modern CPU (P4 or Athlon64), Memtest86+ may be better for you. (I couldn't get it to run properly on a P3 Tualatin, so I assume that it doesn't really like older CPUs/motherboards)

[ 27 January 2006: Message edited by: DrConway ]


From: You shall not side with the great against the powerless. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Rufus Polson
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3308

posted 27 January 2006 02:09 PM      Profile for Rufus Polson     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Cartman:

I am very tempted to switch. I worry about whether there will be compatibility issues though (i.e. Powerpoint, WordPerfect, Dreamweaver, Endnote, STATA, Stat Transfer etc.). OTOH, I sure hear a lot of good things from Mac users.

Compatibility is a reasonable worry. Speaking as a Linux user, to get specific

Powerpoint: OpenOffice does fine with .ppt

Wordperfect: I believe there's a Linux version.

Dreamweaver: Potential problem. I mean, presumably the end results (i.e. web pages in html) are the same when you use any of the various Linux software for the same purpose. But they don't work the same, and I don't know if Dreamweaver can involve sort of intermediate project-file kinds of things that might be a problem.

Don't know about stats, although I believe there is quite a bit of scientific and statistical stuff that runs on Linux, even primarily, just because of the legacy of Unix use in science. Then there's Codeweavers' Crossover Office, which will run an awful lot of Windows programs on Linux, among which I'm pretty sure Dreamweaver is included.

Gir--what are you running? Gentoo?
Michael--Even in terms of the amount of effort you're talking about, I dunno. Times have changed, man. The only thing I ever have to fiddle with anymore when installing a new version is getting my hands on proprietary multimedia codecs and getting the multimedia software to work.
Got a new DVD drive as a gift a while ago. As soon as it was properly installed in the box, when I booted my Mandriva detected it being there and made it work. Slipped a DVD in the drive and up pops the icon on the desktop. No muss, no fuss.

[ 27 January 2006: Message edited by: Rufus Polson ]


From: Caithnard College | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
radiorahim
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2777

posted 27 January 2006 09:59 PM      Profile for radiorahim     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Michael--Even in terms of the amount of effort you're talking about, I dunno. Times have changed, man. The only thing I ever have to fiddle with anymore when installing a new version is getting my hands on proprietary multimedia codecs and getting the multimedia software to work.
Got a new DVD drive as a gift a while ago. As soon as it was properly installed in the box, when I booted my Mandriva detected it being there and made it work. Slipped a DVD in the drive and up pops the icon on the desktop. No muss, no fuss.


As for hardware compatibility, the only thing that's still a bit on the buggy side is some of the newer and maybe more obscure brands of wireless network cards. The other thing I can think of is some bits of proprietary hardware on some notebook computers.

With the new 64 bit CPU's, several Linux distros had support for them before Microsoft got around to putting out a 64 bit version of Windows XP. And of course...if you want 64-bit Windows XP it's going to cost you...while Linux is free>

I have a few bits of older hardware around that Windows didn't support past Windows 98...a Voodoo 3dfx 16 MB PCI video card for one. It works "out of the box" on Linux.

As for applications...yeah the chief drawback with Linux is multimedia games. Although a Canadian company called Transgaming puts out a programme called Cedega that allows you to run Windows games on Linux. The reviews I've heard are mixed. Some games run better...some don't work at all.

I do have Codeweaver's Cross Over Office running on my Xandros computer (my version of Xandros 3.0 comes with it). Funnily enough though I picked up a virus!

But, it couldn't do any real damage...it was running inside a totally separate protected "fake" Windows space.

I looked at Crossover's website and apparently Dreamweaver MX does work, but Dreamweaver MX 2004 doesn't work. There are other versions of Dreamweaver listed that are "untested".

Crossover costs money but is based on "Wine" which is free. Codeweavers is working with the Wine community to try to get as many Windows applications working with Linux as possible. Obviously this is a huge job...and they're always looking for folks to help with testing.

Here's a link to CrossOver's compatibility list:

CrossOver compatibility list


From: a Micro$oft-free computer | Registered: Jun 2002  |  IP: Logged
Agent 204
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4668

posted 27 January 2006 10:10 PM      Profile for Agent 204   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Watkins:

If you want to buy a politically correct PC, good luck. Perhaps its best to buy one that meets needs and is likely to hold up, and use the tool to fight against that which you don't approve


Actually, it's very easy to buy a politically correct PC- just buy it second hand. Even if it's a Dell, the company doesn't get a cent from you- and furthermore, you're helping conserve the not insignificant resources that go into making a new one. And unless you're into high end games, heavy duty CAD, or the like, it should serve you just fine.

From: home of the Guess Who | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7791

posted 28 January 2006 12:17 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Both my computers - a Win98 (1998) and a WinXP (2003) are clones, assembled to my specs by independent contractors. Both will be running Linux very soon.
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Cougyr
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3336

posted 28 January 2006 03:17 AM      Profile for Cougyr     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Re: "politically correct PC"

"PC" stands for personal computer, and that's important. If it's yours, do what you want with it. If you like Windows, enjoy. If not, choose something else. Even though I have used Linux for several years, I never try to persuade other users to change. Heck, the rest of my family won't change even though they know that the most reliable computer that any of them have ever seen anywhere, at any time is my Linux box.


From: over the mountain | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
Gir Draxon
leftist-rightie and rightist-leftie
Babbler # 3804

posted 28 January 2006 04:06 AM      Profile for Gir Draxon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Watkins:

Certainly using *nix is a less than 'plug and play' experience, however for those interested in being free from software tyranny (or cost), its a viable option.


It took me almost a month to get a fully configured Linux workstation running. Now part of that was getting the legacy hardware to work, so yeah if I had a brand new machine it would have been a bit less difficult... but I did spend a lot of time trying to install and reinstall various distrobutions. So if you like to work on computers, go for it. If Windows is a bit tricky for you, leave linux alone despite all the promises of free software....

quote:
Originally posted by Brian White:
I would definitely recommend to anybody with a computer and a cable internet connection to get a copy of damn small linux and a copy of knoppix. Knoppix Version 3.7 works on older computers and version 4 and up works on the newer ones.
I leant a damn small cd to one of my friends recently when her hard drive burnt out.
Damn small has only a hundred megs or less on it and even though she couldnt do a whole lot of work without a harddrive, she could still browse the web quickly and answer all her web based email.
Damn small allows you to download applications straight into the computer ram and install them there I just downloaded and ran games when I tried that and it works on any computer i have tried it on. Knoppix did not work in the one with the burnt out harddrive but it is amazing on the newer computers and I have used it to save data for people many times.
Brian


Puppy has a similar liveCD. It's a bit bigger, but it has the basics.

quote:
Originally posted by Rufus Polson:

Gir--what are you running? Gentoo?

Ubuntu gave me the best results. A little slow, but good considering the hardware. But for my primary usage, I've got a newer box running XP Pro.

And a word of advice to XP users... start>control panel>(switch to classic view)>administrative tools>services. Find Remote Registry and Messenger. Turn them off.


From: Arkham Asylum | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
vorlon
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6789

posted 28 January 2006 08:39 AM      Profile for vorlon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Rufus Polson:

Compatibility is a reasonable worry. Speaking as a Linux user, to get specific

Powerpoint: OpenOffice does fine with .ppt

Wordperfect: I believe there's a Linux version.


There used to be a linux version that you could download from Corel; I'm not sure if it is available any more. If need be, I could dig through my archives and dig up a copy.


quote:
Dreamweaver: Potential problem. I mean, presumably the end results (i.e. web pages in html) are the same when you use any of the various Linux software for the same purpose. But they don't work the same, and I don't know if Dreamweaver can involve sort of intermediate project-file kinds of things that might be a problem.

Don't know about stats, although I believe there is quite a bit of scientific and statistical stuff that runs on Linux, even primarily, just because of the legacy of Unix use in science. Then there's Codeweavers' Crossover Office, which will run an awful lot of Windows programs on Linux, among which I'm pretty sure Dreamweaver is included.


Crossover is good, although VMWare is far, far better. I used to use VMWare when doing technical support; I had a modest laptop with a 1.6GHz Celeron processor; I added memory to it, so it had 1GB of memory. This allowed me to run 6 simultaneous operating systems: linux native, and Win98SE, WinME, WinNT4, Win2000 and WinXP Pro as virtual machines. Each OS was fully functional, I could surf with each of them if I wished.


quote:
Gir--what are you running? Gentoo?
Michael--Even in terms of the amount of effort you're talking about, I dunno. Times have changed, man. The only thing I ever have to fiddle with anymore when installing a new version is getting my hands on proprietary multimedia codecs and getting the multimedia software to work.
Got a new DVD drive as a gift a while ago. As soon as it was properly installed in the box, when I booted my Mandriva detected it being there and made it work. Slipped a DVD in the drive and up pops the icon on the desktop. No muss, no fuss.

[ 27 January 2006: Message edited by: Rufus Polson ]


Best multimedia player hands-down is vlc, available from http://www.videolan.org


From: Canada | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged
rbil
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 582

posted 28 January 2006 03:42 PM      Profile for rbil     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
VMWare is a commercial product and as the previous poster said, is excellent. I just wanted to let people know that VMWare now offers a "Player" that is free. It's available for both Windows and Linux. It lacks the ability to create your own virtual machines as VMWare Workstation permits, but such pre-made virtual machines should become more and more available to work in the Player. VMWare has a few available now for download.

Visit vmware.com to learn more.


From: IRC: irc.bcwireless.net JOIN: #linuxtalk | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged

All times are Pacific Time  

Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic    Move Topic    Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
Hop To:

Contact Us | rabble.ca | Policy Statement

Copyright 2001-2008 rabble.ca