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Author Topic: Calgary police say five dead in 'domestic homicide' II
KenS
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posted 31 May 2008 11:39 AM      Profile for KenS     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Continuing earlier thread just closed. and with no intention this opening thread be THE topic. [Not that it would anyway.]

I'd like to bring back an important pracitical point made early on.

It was sort of impicit in some things people said, but I never saw it focused on again.

It may well be that Mr. Lall turns out to be not only someone who was not abusive, but he didn't even show significant predictive signs of becoming abusive.

People snap. That's a pretty extreme case. But it happens, and it doesn't have to be anywhere near that spectacular to be serious.

And when a man snaps, who is at risk?

So domestic violence awareness eductaion should sensitize people to this possibility. With some prior consideration about unintended consequences of stigmatizing men under mental health pressure and how to not do that.

[ 31 May 2008: Message edited by: KenS ]


From: Minasville, NS | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
bigcitygal
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posted 31 May 2008 01:29 PM      Profile for bigcitygal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
A number of years ago I read a book, a kind of book I don't usually read. It was a popular book for a while, called "The Gift of Fear" by Gavin de Becker, a USian psychologist.

Full disclosure: he was on Oprah, he was wildly popular in the mainstream US, and his regular gig is protecting movie stars and celebrities.

Oh, and he has NO feminist, race or class analysis. He ain't so good on the Israel/Palestine issue either. That's of course a huge barrier to being able to read him.

But I found many incredible, scary, and valuable stories in his book, which I re-read every few years.

de Becker talks about how nobody "just snaps". If someone is going to be violent, there are reliable predictors of such violence.

He talks about our intuition, and our fear, both survival skills we have as creatures, that we have learned to not listen to in modern society. And when he talks about fear, he means real fear, not "I'm afraid of talking in front of people" but fear-for-your-life fear, the kind that I know I've felt very rarely in my life.

de Becker talks about Perceived Justification, Perceived Alternatives, Perceived Consequences and Perceived Ability. I'm sure the paperback, which I bought for $8.99 ten years ago, is in the library or on sale for 50 cents somewhere.

I know next to nothing about this horrible story in Calgary, nor does anyone else here. If everyone else wants to continue to talk about that, please do so. I just wanted to put my thoughts out there, because I don't believe the man "just snapped".

Gavin de Becker


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Cueball
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posted 31 May 2008 01:34 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I read that book. And it was very interesting, though I did not agree with all of it, somce of it was really good rock solid advice. Specifically paying attention to gut signals, which many people apparently try and overide. If you feel something is wrong, maybe something is wrong.

He put a lot of emphasis on not second guessing your own feelings.


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martin dufresne
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posted 31 May 2008 01:48 PM      Profile for martin dufresne   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yes, it's good advice. But advice to victims and the suggestion that they may not have done right sounds... let's just say limited, especially knowing what few resources and entitlements there are for women to escape such situations.
I agree with BCG that de Becker has no feminist reading of DV. People may not snap, but they sure snap at glib explanations and solutions when something risks shattering their worldview.

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Cueball
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posted 31 May 2008 01:50 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
They sure do.
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remind
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posted 31 May 2008 02:03 PM      Profile for remind     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
BTW BCG, thank you and the others who put all those links up in the last thread, it is too bad we just do not have 1 thread for those resources that could be bumped daily so they are not lost and are easily accessable to all, if they ever need them.

Also, I do not believe that people just "snap" either, there is always a process of either, societal de-compensation, or historical controlling/violent actions, involved in any situation that I have come across professionally, and personally.


From: "watching the tide roll away" | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
KenS
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posted 31 May 2008 04:33 PM      Profile for KenS     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
My point was not whether or not the guy "just snapped". It is that even if he did, the same thing still stands about the need to educate about the potential of violence to women and children.

It just makes sense that ANY male might "act out" against women- no matter how little signs they have shown towards that. Psychotic people lash out- and where do men lash out?

Maybe its just because of my experience with people in the depths of psychotic episodes, but I'm not convinced that people do not "just snap". Admittedly, I've not seen someone turn to violence against people, but they sure give me the impression that anything is possible, and when I've asked the professionals, they don't say it is unlikely. Just hedging their bets maybe? And I also have a lack of confidence in psychiatrists, but I prefer them to being left to our own devices to deal with it.

Like I said, I'm not convinced. Ultimately thats a question for weighing a lot of evidence.

And it seems to me just prudent to without alarmism put out the message as well as looking for warning signs [many of which are not obvious]... that the potential for violence from psychotic males should always be taken seriously.


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TemporalHominid
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posted 31 May 2008 05:57 PM      Profile for TemporalHominid   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
co-workers and friends remember

Amber Bowerman

Friends remember

Alison Fisher

[ 31 May 2008: Message edited by: TemporalHominid ]


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martin dufresne
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posted 31 May 2008 08:22 PM      Profile for martin dufresne   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
potential for violence from psychotic males should always be taken seriously
Of course, that also goes for non-psychotic males. And males whom you have no idea whether they will be labeled psychotic by whomever after they turn violent.

From: "Words Matter" (Mackinnon) | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
scooter
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posted 01 June 2008 12:18 PM      Profile for scooter     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by KenS:
...that the potential for violence from psychotic males should always be taken seriously.

And what would you suggestion society should do? Should we lock them up? Force them into medical treatment? Heck, how would you spot someone like Mr. Lall?

Last time I checked, forcing an adult into medical treatment, specially mental treatment, is extremely difficult.

Even Mr. Lall's doctor didn't catch this just a few days before he started killing.


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remind
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posted 01 June 2008 01:16 PM      Profile for remind     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by scooter:
Even Mr. Lall's doctor didn't catch this just a few days before he started killing.

How do you know this?


And if it is the case that the Dr missed it, i would think the Dr learned huge a lesson.


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martin dufresne
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posted 01 June 2008 08:03 PM      Profile for martin dufresne   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
From Katie Blewaska, the Lals' caregiver:
quote:
Joshua was "a very dedicated" father who fretted over what kinds of activities Blewaska would do with the girls.

Before she started her job, Joshua apologized for having to ask Blewaska for a police background check. He got her to sign a contract saying she wouldn't spank the girls and wouldn't allow the girls to play with Barbie dolls out of concern for the image it portrayed of women, Blewaska said.

"The kids were everything to him," she said. "You could tell his family was so important to him, and they had the best of everything they could get, not in the material sense, but in the value of life rather than the quantity of what they could get." (Calgary Herald website)


Reads like the typical control freak/batterer.


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Sven
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posted 01 June 2008 09:04 PM      Profile for Sven     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by scooter:
And what would you suggestion society should do? Should we lock them up? Force them into medical treatment? Heck, how would you spot someone like Mr. Lall?

Last time I checked, forcing an adult into medical treatment, specially mental treatment, is extremely difficult.


This is a fundamental difficulty regarding preventing these killings. If a person has a mental condition that is medically treatable, either the individual has to voluntarily accept treatment or be forced to undergo treatment. Forced treatment of medical conditions is usually not successful.

And, as martin dufresne correctly pointed out in the other thread, many (most?) potential killers are not "treatable" (i.e., they don't have a medical condition that is treatable).

Locking people up for "pre-crimes" (ala "Minority Report") has its own difficulties.


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martin dufresne
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posted 01 June 2008 09:09 PM      Profile for martin dufresne   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Interesting how both of you are in lockstep with a straw man about "locking up" people like Lall when no one else has suggested any such thing. If you really want to know what is being proposed, you could re-read the previous thread.
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Sven
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posted 01 June 2008 09:17 PM      Profile for Sven     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by martin dufresne:
Interesting how both of you are in lockstep with a straw man about "locking up" people like Lall when no one else has suggested any such thing.

Actually, no one has suggested that anyone be locked up. The issue is, in part: What steps can be taken to prevent an individual from killing people? There are a finite number of options: (1) Treatment (if possible), (2) retraining them if they exhibit tendencies that indicate they may kill, (3) education (although that may have limited success for someone who possesses tendencies that indicate future homicidal behavior), (4) taking steps to secure the safety of those who may be most likely to be the victims of the individual, (5) ???

quote:
Originally posted by martin dufresne:
If you really want to know what is being proposed, you could re-read the previous thread.

Most of what has been proposed, I think, has been a focus on (4).

[ 01 June 2008: Message edited by: Sven ]


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Sven
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posted 01 June 2008 09:29 PM      Profile for Sven     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I have a friend about whom I'm very concerned about her safety. She is married to a very creepy man. He hasn't physically harmed her but he's very controlling and has made very ugly threats to her (essentially "If you leave me, I'll find you"). He basically lives in the basement and no one in the family is allowed in that part of the house. The kids are nearly of the age when they will leave home and, when that happens, my friend wants to leave her husband. I'm very concerned about her.

With regard to option (4), I hate the idea that she has to run off to hide and live in fear that, someday, he will find her. I hate the idea that she may have to uproot her life. She shouldn't have to live in a shelter (real or metaphorical) for the rest of her life.

So, what advice would you give her, Martin?

ETA: Another bizarre behavior of his is that she has found notebooks of his that are filled up with repeated numbers...page after page after page.

[ 01 June 2008: Message edited by: Sven ]


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martin dufresne
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posted 01 June 2008 09:47 PM      Profile for martin dufresne   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Thanks for being so straightforward. Sharing this concern with her without being judgmental is extremely important. I think she needs to talk to women who know such situations very well. She doesn't have to check into a women's shelter to contact one and learn what are her rights, options and local resources. There is a very good book by Ann Jones and Susan Schechter called When Love Goes Wrong (Harper-Collins, 1992) that helps readers makes sense of a controlling situation. There is a whole chapter on what you can do as a friend of a woman caught in such a situation, how to deal with your own feelings of fear and occasional frustration. I highly recommend it.
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Sven
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posted 01 June 2008 10:00 PM      Profile for Sven     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by martin dufresne:
Sharing this concern with her without being judgmental is extremely important. I think she needs to talk to women who know such situations very well.

I'm going to order the book. Thanks, MD.

Ms. Sven was in a very abusive relationship at one time and is the one really trying to help our friend (I'm keeping a back seat--not that I'm not very, very concerned but I really think it's something where other women will be able to talk with our friend in a way that's more comfortable for her).


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bigcitygal
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posted 02 June 2008 04:12 AM      Profile for bigcitygal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Sven, please pass on info about this website which, although based in Ontario only, has very useful general info about abuse and support, as well as how to cover your tracks while looking on different support sites on the internet. They even have a section about when you clear the memory of visited sites it might look suspicious, so after you check out sites re. abuse and support, delete them, then go visit a bunch of non-related sites in order to not have an empty cache. Yes, abusers look for this, and are this smart. Women who work in this field, however, are smarter.

Sven, you've actually provided an example that fits very well in this discussion. This man will be violent towards his partner if she doesn't leave. He will likely be violent towards her if she does leave, but she must leave as soon as possible, not wait for her children to leave home some mystical time in the future. If she can hear this advice, and have a safety plan in place (there's ton of info about what is a safety plan on the internet) she needs to leave as soon as possible. This is the moment, before lasting physical harm has occurred, that there is opportunity to salvage the rest of her life.

I agree there's a limited amount of support you can provide, given she's not your friend, so please pass this info on to your wife.

As for option 4, I agree with you, it's not fair. But when it comes to keeping a woman safe and alive, issues of fairness are irrelevant. I can't emphasize this enough. She is the top priority, as well as her children if they are at risk.


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remind
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posted 02 June 2008 10:06 AM      Profile for remind     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I Won't Let Her Go

Man travels to Ottawa, kills fiancee

Without telling anyone, Sawchuk booked a last-minute flight from Calgary to Ottawa Saturday morning. By 5 p.m., the long-distance couple, who were planning a September wedding, were dead by his hand, police say.

She was planning to leave him and he couldn't live without her, his family told Sun Media from Calgary yesterday.


http://winnipegsun.com/News/Canada/2008/06/02/5742551-sun.html


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martin dufresne
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posted 02 June 2008 02:53 PM      Profile for martin dufresne   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Letter to the Sun: Ryan Sawchuk made his intentions clear

"Without telling anyone, Sawchuk booked a last-minute flight from Calgary to Ottawa," writes the Winnipeg Sun.
And yet, a few lines below, you quote the murderer's father: ""He wasn't going to let Alicia go," he replied. "He said 'I won't let her go.' "
Men who murder their partner almost always signal their intentions, testing the ground so to speak. Not taking these statements at face value can cost a woman her life. It did for Alicia Bateman.
Please, let's all stand up to abusers and make it clear to them that possessivity and "crimes of honour" are unacceptable in Canadian society.

Martin Dufresne
Montreal, Qc


From: "Words Matter" (Mackinnon) | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
remind
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posted 02 June 2008 03:01 PM      Profile for remind     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Good job Martin, I am having a very difficult time with the words by the father and the whole murderous action itself..

When a man says he cannot live without a woman, it actually means, "she cannot live without me, because I won't let her".

Then because they know they will go to prison they take the themselves out.


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martin dufresne
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posted 02 June 2008 03:34 PM      Profile for martin dufresne   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I hesitate to generalize but here are a few patterns I have noticed:

Many of the murderers do not suicide.

Others self-inflict mere superficial wounds, as if to paint themselves as the co-victim of events they had no agency or control in.

Those that do complete suicide probably do not do so in order to avoid prison - since they are choosing a worse fate - but because they are too spineless to accept the loss of someone whom they are deeptly invested in controlling and they are socially entitled to use violence agaunst when they do not get/keep what they want.

And, worse of all, those who do not suicide almost always are allowed to plea-bargain a reduced charge depite clearest indications of premeditation, as soon as they plead any combination of grief, provocation or temporary insanity. Prison sentences for wife-murder often sometimes run as short as one year.

Consider the case of Céline Carrière, 35, strangled by her husband, Pierre Larochelle, 36, on October 12, 2000 in Omerville (Qc).
He left a 10-page letter attempting to justify the murder by smearing the victim as having told him he was a failure, she had a lover, etc. A Montreal tabloid hammered home this message for days during his trial, presenting the murderer as the real hapless victim in this case. The Crown only charged him with involuntary homicide and the Crown merely asked for 5-7 years of detention. Despite acknowledging the "voluntary character" of Larochelle's act, the trial jusge sentenced him to a mere three years (that is one year with parole). To justify his request for such a short sentence, the Crown prosecutor had the gall to argue that "Two children have lost both their mother and their father in this sad affair..."

Arrrgggghhhh...

[ 02 June 2008: Message edited by: martin dufresne ]


From: "Words Matter" (Mackinnon) | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
remind
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posted 02 June 2008 03:40 PM      Profile for remind     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
and what about the "if he can get away with it, and/or do it, so can I" mentality present too, Martin.
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martin dufresne
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posted 02 June 2008 03:51 PM      Profile for martin dufresne   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
That's so true... and scary. For monitoring these murders, I have often noticed a clear "copy-cat" pattern where a man will kill a partner or children within days of such a murder by another man in the same province or region - in the context of the predictable media barrage of compassion heaped on the murderer's "issues". Women's shelters also often report being told by battered women at such moments that they would rather stay or return home rather than be stalked and killed (as Ms. Bateman was in Ottawa).
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martin dufresne
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posted 02 June 2008 08:36 PM      Profile for martin dufresne   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
For those who may have missed it, Canwest announced 19 hour ago that Sawchuk - the man who flew from Calgary to kill his fiancee after playing a golf tournament - was an employee of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS).
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laine lowe
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posted 02 June 2008 09:39 PM      Profile for laine lowe     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by martin dufresne:
For those who may have missed it, Canwest announced 19 hour ago that Sawchuk - the man who flew from Calgary to kill his fiancee after playing a golf tournament - was an employee of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS).

I thought that it was his fiance, Alicia Bateman, who was employed by CSIS and that Sawchuk tried to find a job while in Ottawa but didn't succeed so he returned to Calgary.

I find these crimes terrifying. I appreciate all the great links that have been provided but I fear that too many people aren't aware of the tell tale signs or think that preserving a relationship should be the ultimate goal, despite what can be devastating consequences.

The Joshua Lall case really disturbs me, or at least how it has been covered. It reminds me of the Andrea Yates case. In addition to suffering from severe depression, she was involved with a very fundamentalist fringe Christian group that had her convinced that she was evil/possessed etc.

Alison Lall was described by her friends as being very Christian, as in that would be one of the three words she would use to describe herself. That rigidness in raising their children and almost obsessive scheduling of their daily activities that Martin pointed out is something that I have seen as being a huge focus of some religious sects who are into the whole Christian home schooling movement.

I have to wonder whether there was some other dynamic going on in that household, including his so called seeking of help (as implied by Alison's last e-mail to their nanny) including a private chat with a pastor who insisted that family was primary and he couldn't walk away from his responsibilities.

Little has been said about their religious background. Kind of ironic given how it's the opposite when it comes to domestic violence that involves Muslim family members killing their female offspring.


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martin dufresne
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posted 02 June 2008 11:07 PM      Profile for martin dufresne   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I thought that it was his fiancée, Alicia Bateman, who was employed by CSIS and that Sawchuk tried to find a job while in Ottawa but didn't succeed so he returned to Calgary.
Right. Sorry for the confusion...

[ 02 June 2008: Message edited by: martin dufresne ]


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Cueball
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posted 02 June 2008 11:24 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by laine lowe:
Little has been said about their religious background. Kind of ironic given how it's the opposite when it comes to domestic violence that involves Muslim family members killing their female offspring.

Yes, well someone brought up the issue of the possible Muslimness or Hinduness or Budhistness of the family on the original thread before the facts were known, and this post was erased. I guess because of the discovery of the facts. I guess Lall is an ambiguous name.

[ 02 June 2008: Message edited by: Cueball ]


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scooter
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posted 04 June 2008 04:16 AM      Profile for scooter     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by remind:
And if it is the case that the Dr missed it, i would think the Dr learned huge a lesson.

What lesson do you think the doctor learned? To second guess their decision? Over react and notify the police of all depressed/troubled patients?

Catching serious mental health issues is difficult and complex at the best of times. Why do you think the courts have a 30-day psychiatric assessment. If it was easy then it would be a 3 minute assessment.


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remind
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posted 04 June 2008 06:31 AM      Profile for remind     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by scooter:
What lesson do you think the doctor learned?
Much more about mental health issues, and how some present.
quote:
To second guess their decision?
This is an offensive comment, there would be no second guessing it would be looking at presenting symptoms a little closer.
quote:
Over react and notify the police of all depressed/troubled patients?
This is even more offensive given the end result of the Drs failing to understand where Lall was at. I do not think in this case, the case we are discussing, it would have been over reacting to anything, eh?!

quote:
Catching serious mental health issues is difficult and complex at the best of times. Why do you think the courts have a 30-day psychiatric assessment. If it was easy then it would be a 3 minute assessment.

An actual psychiatric assessment does not take 30 days scooter.

[ 04 June 2008: Message edited by: remind ]


From: "watching the tide roll away" | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
martin dufresne
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posted 04 June 2008 07:20 AM      Profile for martin dufresne   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
If it's so difficult and complex, why treat it with such superficial comments, scooter?
I think we can agree that it is imperative that a coroner's inquest go into what signals Lall gave out and who disregarded them, who "counseled" him and what role religious ideology may have played in keeping his wife from really seeking help outside of the fold. Dr. Marie Fortune (Keeping the Faith: Guidance for Christian Women Facing Abuse) is a strong feminist on this link between Christian ideology in people's lives and sexist violence.
There are more women than we think in our communities facing Alison Lall's situation.

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scooter
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posted 04 June 2008 07:41 AM      Profile for scooter     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by martin dufresne:
If it's so difficult and complex, why treat it with such superficial comments, scooter?

I guess I'm just following your lead. My bad.

Maybe we should put a lock on this thread and return to it in a few months when we have more facts instead of making them up.


From: High River | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
martin dufresne
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 11463

posted 04 June 2008 09:31 AM      Profile for martin dufresne   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I am not "making up anything". We are all working from what the media have reported.
The problem with waiting a few months (or years) to advocate for change is that coroners' reports tend to attract little media interest, so we don't get to know what's in them.
A rare exception for those of us who want to look for patterns is Lee Lakeman's book Obsession, with intent - Violence against women, a 2005 Black Rose Books offering that traces the attempts to make social systems more attuned to the reality of male violence against women and how the justice system is often complicitous with abusers.
This book developed from a collective five-year pan-Canadian research & analysis project of the Vancouver Rape Relief and Women's Shelter collective.
It's a tremendous read. Here is the Table of Contents:
quote:
Introduction

Prologue: The Heron Case

The Background of Relations Between the Canadian Government and the Canadian Women's Movement

Decriminalizing Violence Against Women and Criminalizing Women's Self Defence

Pickton, the Police, the Pig Farm and the Missing Women

Bernardo and Pickton: Making the Cases of Monsters

The Strength of Frontline Feminist Experience

Power Politics Not of Our Making: The Giant in Our Midst

R v. Tyhurst and Gorman v. Tyhurst

Staying in Charge While Using Professional Advice

The Money Story: Who Owns the Dam and Controls the Flow of the River

Action-Oriented and Participatory Research: Pulling One Another Out of the River … One by One

Equality Seeking: Let's Go Up the River and Get the Guys Who are Throwing Women In

Nellie Nippard's Story

Jane Doe and The Charter from the CASAC Point of View

An International Discussion: Violence and Equality

Discussion of Equality and Sexist Violence in the UN, Post Beijing

Does Trade Trump Rights? World Trade Organization (WTO) and the UN

The Trafficked Chinese Boat Women of Fujian Province

The Bottom Line: The Loss of the Women's Welfare

A Global Economy: The Promotion of Prostitution

The Basic Social Unit: Enforcing the Private Domain and Upholding the Patriarchal Family After Divorce

The Charter of Rights and Freedoms

Bonnie Mooney's Story

Local Documents Reviewed: 911; Police; Prosecutor; Court; Sentencing

May/Iles and Hadley Wife Murders and the Use of Coroner's Courts

What 100 Women Say About Emergency Response

100 Women Assess Initial Police Response

911 Death By Indifference in Winnipeg

Preparing the Case: The Detective's Job Determining the Crime

David Hilton Junior, Convicted March 2001, Sentence Seven Years

Former Nova Scotia Premier, Gerald Regan and Eighteen Sex Related Charges

Just For Laughs: From Guilty Plea to Unconditional Discharge

How Does the System Prevent Convictions in Cases of Violence Against Women?

What is the Connection to Women's Rights and Violence Against Women?

Conclusions and Recommendations

Some Key Recommendations Arising from the Local Document Review and the Cases of Another 100 Women

References


[ 04 June 2008: Message edited by: martin dufresne ]


From: "Words Matter" (Mackinnon) | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
remind
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6289

posted 04 June 2008 10:12 AM      Profile for remind     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by martin dufresne:
I am not "making up anything". We are all working from what the media have reported.
Whats to make up anyway? It really irks me when people, mainly men, try treating each case of violence and violence leading to the murder of women and their children as if it is some unique stand alone case where the dynamics are different in each and every case.

They aren't.

1. It is either extreme manifestation of patriarchy and ownership of the woman and children

2. A psychotic breakdown.

3. Misogyny

4. or a combination of any of the above.


From: "watching the tide roll away" | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged

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