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Author Topic: Toronto drug squad
Red T-shirt
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5872

posted 12 January 2006 06:30 PM      Profile for Red T-shirt     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Didn't see an active thread on this so I'm starting one. Just heard on CBC radio that one of the Toronto Drug Squad cops already charged with drug trafficing and corruption offences has been arrested again. After the first round of charges he was also charged with a number of drug posession issues over several elicit drugs found in a search of his home. Now he is charged with soliciting a prostitue and being impared. Problem was the prostitute he chose was an undercover policewoman. Is this guy having a bad year or what?
From: Port Hope, Ontario | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
skeptikool
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 11389

posted 12 January 2006 11:50 PM      Profile for skeptikool        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Whether drugs, prostition or gambling, such huge sums are involved that one must ask, who is watching the watchers?

One big step to reduce the criminal element, policing and court costs, would be to accord marijuana the same status as that of tobacco and alcohol. Enough of the make-work hypocrisy!


From: Delta BC | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
Brett Mann
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6441

posted 13 January 2006 01:01 AM      Profile for Brett Mann        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Want to make a real contribution as a progressive writer? Find a way to package the public responsibility to monitor police activities as the right thing to do. We in Canada pride ourselves that in our system, cries of "unpatriotic!" do not silence political debate. Except, that is, when it comes to police powers in urban centers. There, a different set of rules apply, and public attitudes and discourse are largely shaped by official voices who have lifetimes of experience in playing the "fear of crime" card with the masses. A hot young Canadian writer/thinker might profitably spend some time thinking about how to tell folks that it is important to be leery of the inherent possibilties of abuse of power in any large police force.

The issue of drug squads is a separate discussion, almost. These are the most problematic of all police units in terms of corruption and brutality, and it would be a very good thing indeed if police forces generally could be brought to understand that drug units, almost by their very nature, bring all law enforcement into disrepute. J. Edgar Hoover famously argued against giving the FBI drug enforcement duties because he was well aware of the corruption and tarnishing of the FBI image which would ensue.

Boy, would I ever like to see somebody come up with a "control the cops" pr formulation that would influence the Toronto Sun - reading segment of the Toronto demographic. That would be change!


From: Prince Edward County ON | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
$1000 Wedding
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 11486

posted 13 January 2006 02:17 AM      Profile for $1000 Wedding        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Do you seriously expect police to be 100% clean when the fact is they and criminals are two sides of the same coin? They speak the same language and share a common culture. It's very easy to cross the line and move back and forth between good and bad when it's all so relative to the morality they must deal with daily. It's so easy for us to be sanctimonious and pious, but how many of us have ever kicked in a drug dealer's house (aside from other drug dealers) and been confronted with boxes of cocaine and a wall full of cash? Be careful about casting the first stone unless you know for an absolute fact you could walk away from such temptations?

Sometimes the end justifies the means and it's necessary to torture a bad guy with a taser. But, who knows how often is sometimes and when it's right or wrong? The police have a tough enough job without idealists raising their expectations to unreasonable heights.


From: Vancouver | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
Sam Steele
recent-rabble-rouser
Babbler # 11575

posted 13 January 2006 02:39 AM      Profile for Sam Steele     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by $1000 Wedding:
Do you seriously expect police to be 100% clean when the fact is they and criminals are two sides of the same coin? They speak the same language and share a common culture. It's very easy to cross the line and move back and forth between good and bad when it's all so relative to the morality they must deal with daily. It's so easy for us to be sanctimonious and pious, but how many of us have ever kicked in a drug dealer's house (aside from other drug dealers) and been confronted with boxes of cocaine and a wall full of cash? Be careful about casting the first stone unless you know for an absolute fact you could walk away from such temptations?

Sometimes the end justifies the means and it's necessary to torture a bad guy with a taser. But, who knows how often is sometimes and when it's right or wrong? The police have a tough enough job without idealists raising their expectations to unreasonable heights.


I've been doing the job for a few years and it's actually really easy to remain clean. Thankfully I work with good people who have never crossed the line beyond the occasional discourteous language. Police are generally paid well all across Canada so official corruption is limited to greed rather than any excuse of necessity.


From: BC | Registered: Jan 2006  |  IP: Logged
voice of the damned
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6943

posted 13 January 2006 03:11 AM      Profile for voice of the damned     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Boy, would I ever like to see somebody come up with a "control the cops" pr formulation that would influence the Toronto Sun - reading segment of the Toronto demographic. That would be change!


I recall a few instances in which the Edmonton Sun turned against the police department on particular issues. One time, it involved revelations that the Edmonton cops had been sending officers' brothers to massage parlours in order to collect evidence of illegal activity. These "investigations" involved the infomrants getting hand-jobs from the "therapists", who were subsequently arrested(unlike the infomrants). The Sun's editorial on this issue was quite scathing.

But that kind of an issue has populist appeal. A lot of people are gonna think "gee, if I went to a massage parlour I'd get arrested, but these informants are being treated like big heroes". Plus, a lot of people regard prostitution as a victimless crime, so don't have the same animosity toward prostitutes that they might have toward the kind of person who is regarded as the typical victim of police brutality.


From: Asia | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged

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