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Author Topic: New jaw bone grown in man's back muscle
Jimmy Brogan
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posted 27 August 2004 10:24 AM      Profile for Jimmy Brogan   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
German doctors use novel procedure to create transplant

quote:
German who had his lower jaw cut out because of cancer has enjoyed his first meal in nine years ? a bratwurst sandwich ? after surgeons grew a new jaw bone in his back muscle and transplanted it to his mouth in what experts call an ?ambitious? experiment.



According to this week?s issue of The Lancet medical journal, the German doctors used a mesh cage, a growth chemical and the patient?s own bone marrow, containing stem cells, to create a new jaw bone that fit exactly into the gap left by the cancer surgery.


Fabulous.

[ 27 August 2004: Message edited by: JimmyBrogan ]


From: The right choice - Iggy Thumbscrews for Liberal leader | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
Briguy
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posted 27 August 2004 10:49 AM      Profile for Briguy     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Is that a jawbone in your armpit, or are you just happy to see me?


(I got nothing)


From: No one is arguing that we should run the space program based on Physics 101. | Registered: Nov 2001  |  IP: Logged
Mr. Magoo
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posted 27 August 2004 10:54 AM      Profile for Mr. Magoo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Could this be used to help Paul Martin grow a backbone in his back?
From: ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø, | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
Rufus Polson
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posted 27 August 2004 02:17 PM      Profile for Rufus Polson     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Magoo!

Aside from the amusement factor though, this is really, really cool. This is totally, mega to the max cool. They grew the guy a *new jaw bone*! What else could you grow new? And they did it using *his own stem cells*! No fetal stuff. This is great! He's got a new jaw and it's his own jaw, which means he shouldn't need to be on bloody immunosuppressant drugs and crap. On the trail to the holy grail--replacement organs and regrowth of spines. We could be looking at a culture shift--rather than spending lots of effort trying to help people in wheelchairs cope, be productive and keep their pride, we might just make them well.


From: Caithnard College | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
Black Dog
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posted 27 August 2004 02:26 PM      Profile for Black Dog   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
We could be looking at a culture shift--rather than spending lots of effort trying to help people in wheelchairs cope, be productive and keep their pride, we might just make them well.

Does that mean I can stop work on my replacement robot body?


From: Vancouver | Registered: Jun 2002  |  IP: Logged
arborman
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posted 27 August 2004 08:08 PM      Profile for arborman     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Rufus Polson:
On the trail to the holy grail--replacement organs and regrowth of spines. We could be looking at a culture shift--rather than spending lots of effort trying to help people in wheelchairs cope, be productive and keep their pride, we might just make them well.

This is appealing, but we need to be careful on how much we 'fix' people we presume to be 'broken'. Most disabilities exist in the social context, and are not really about 'fixing' so much as our own predispositions.

For example, if our culture had slightly different priorities or ways of communicating (more numerically/math based), I would be learning disabled. Luckily for me, that isn't the case.

That being said, the ability to cure injuries, amputations, and particularly spinal injury would be fantastic.

It will raise some interesting questions though. You just know someone wants to patent this. Can someone patent my jaw?


From: I'm a solipsist - isn't everyone? | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
Courage
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posted 27 August 2004 08:33 PM      Profile for Courage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I have no idea why, but the first thing I thought of was how some 'Creation Scientists' in the U.S. will show this as proof that Eve really could have been fashioned out of Adam's rib, and legitimising several Bible prophesies, etc.

They'll find a way.


From: Earth | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged
Rufus Polson
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posted 27 August 2004 08:58 PM      Profile for Rufus Polson     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by arborman:

This is appealing, but we need to be careful on how much we 'fix' people we presume to be 'broken'.

How about how much we 'fix' people who presume themselves to be 'broken'?
I see your point, but it strikes me as overstated or perhaps wrongfooted in context. First of all, the stuff under discussion here involves rebuilding of physical bits that are physically busted. I don't think there's too much debate over whether it's better to have a replaced heart, kidney, lung, spine or whatnot than one which ain't working. Subtle mental issues are not going to be attacked via stem cell research--or at least, not by stem cell research by itself although in certain cases they could become a useful adjunct, I suppose.

Second, the issues raised as old as medicine--they're not tied to particular technologies, they're general questions of ethics: What's the difference between being well and ill and where do we draw the line between a difference and a problem, what standards are needed for consent, what do we consider *informed* consent, how much rights do parents etc. have to order treatment for minors, and on and on. Medical procedures becoming more powerful sharpens the importance of those questions, but doesn't fundamentally change them. So the advent of powerful new techniques is not something to fear because these questions may suddenly become meaningful and important--they've always been meaningful and important.


From: Caithnard College | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
arborman
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posted 28 August 2004 02:46 PM      Profile for arborman     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Don't get me wrong, it's an exciting new technology, and I hope it, with appropriate safeguard, gains widespread use quickly. I just think disability is a touchy topic, and many people who I work with that are deemed 'disabled' or 'broken' would bite my head off if I didn't point out the obvious flaws in much of our perceptions of ability (largely tied to employability, in most cases).

2 Science fiction type questions:

1. How long until the first Olympic 'body adaptation scandal'. Longer toes for swimmers? Webbed fingers?

2. What about military abuses. Tougher bones. Exoskeletons. Wierd freaky stuff?


From: I'm a solipsist - isn't everyone? | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged

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