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Author Topic: City warned of bad driver
Mr. Magoo
guilty-pleasure
Babbler # 3469

posted 09 January 2004 11:16 AM      Profile for Mr. Magoo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
"He has 11 counts of driving while disqualified, six counts of dangerous driving and four counts of failing to stop at the scene of an accident," Davies said.

His rap sheet also includes impaired driving convictions.


How can someone with 11 counts of driving while disqualified be put in any kind of position where he can drive again? How much more obvious does the risk have to be before public safety comes first??


From: ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø, | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
Gentlebreeze
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posted 09 January 2004 11:46 AM      Profile for Gentlebreeze     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I heard about this late night on CBC radios "Here and Now".

Aparently he techincally cannot drive. He has had his drivers license suspended indefinately and cannot drink as a condition of his release. Unfortunately this has not stopped him from driving in the past, so the Chief of Police felt they must warn the residents of his community.

I meant to add...What more can they do? The can't keep him locked up forever.

[ 09 January 2004: Message edited by: Gentlebreeze ]


From: Thornhill | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged
Mr. Magoo
guilty-pleasure
Babbler # 3469

posted 09 January 2004 11:58 AM      Profile for Mr. Magoo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
The can't keep him locked up forever.

Really? Why's that then? Isn't a dangerous offender someone who repeatedly puts the public at risk and for whom there is little hope of rehabilitiation?

I'd say that after ignoring suspensions not once, not twice, but eleven times, he certainly qualifies as someone with zero interest in rehabilitation, and with 6 counts of dangerous driving, four fail-to-stops (which kind of implies at least 4 accidents!) and an unspecified number of DUI's he qualifies as a hazard.

Again: how much more obvious does it need to be?


From: ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø, | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
paxamillion
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posted 09 January 2004 11:59 AM      Profile for paxamillion   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Isn't he a serious risk of harm to others?
From: the process of recovery | Registered: Jul 2002  |  IP: Logged
Gentlebreeze
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posted 09 January 2004 12:15 PM      Profile for Gentlebreeze     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I don't disagree with you. It was a question I was hoping for an answer to from someone...what more CAN they do?

What I wonder is are the actually able to classify him as a dangerous offender and keep him locked up? Does that apply to any sort of offender, including bad drivers?

I don't know the law?


From: Thornhill | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged
paxamillion
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posted 09 January 2004 12:20 PM      Profile for paxamillion   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I wonder if the mental health system could hold him.
From: the process of recovery | Registered: Jul 2002  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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posted 09 January 2004 12:30 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
He really does sound like a menace. But the thought of locking someone up for the rest of his life for something less than murder...sigh.

I don't know. I guess I'm a dreamer that way anyhow because I just hate the whole penal system and wish it could change.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Scott Piatkowski
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posted 09 January 2004 12:30 PM      Profile for Scott Piatkowski   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Maybe we could deport him

quote:
Mackinaw Island Michigan is a place that seems lost in time... It is unique, in that no cars are permitted on the island, except for emergencies.

From: Kitchener-Waterloo | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
Mr. Magoo
guilty-pleasure
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posted 09 January 2004 12:46 PM      Profile for Mr. Magoo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well, I'm sure it's cruel and unusual punishment to make someone live in the U.S. against their will.

How about indefinite house arrest, complete with a big old leg shackle that screams bloody murder if he tries to cross the threshold of his front door? Then he's not a burden on the penal system, and as many babblers can attest, it's possible to earn a living from one's home.


From: ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø, | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
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posted 09 January 2004 12:53 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
What I'd like to know is who is foolish enough to lend him the key to their car? If it is a friend or family member, aren't they co-responsible if he commits a crime with their vehicle?

I know a fellow here who had lost his licence and was harassing a friend to let him use her car. She eventually relented. We advised her never to do that again!


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Mr. Magoo
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posted 09 January 2004 01:05 PM      Profile for Mr. Magoo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
But the thought of locking someone up for the rest of his life for something less than murder...sigh.

Then let him, by his actions, make the choice. I don't know exactly how that would work in this situation without giving him yet another chance to kill someone with a car, but it certainly could have been done last time, like this:

Judge: Mr. Johnson, you've shown yourself to be a menace to others, and you've demonstrated that you have absolutely no respect for the law or this court, so I'm here to tell you that if you incur so much as a speeding ticket once you leave this courtroom that you'll be locked up for the rest of your natural life. Before you can leave you must sign this document indicating that you've been warned of this, and that you understand this warning.

Then it's up to him. It's his responsibility to keep himself out of jail forever, rather than our responsibility to keep giving him breaks. Reckless driving is neither a medical condition nor an addiction; this guy just needs to learn a little respect.

quote:
What I'd like to know is who is foolish enough to lend him the key to their car? If it is a friend or family member, aren't they co-responsible if he commits a crime with their vehicle?

I don't know that a person whose licence has been suspended is necessarily prohibited from owning their own car.


From: ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø, | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
paxamillion
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posted 09 January 2004 01:11 PM      Profile for paxamillion   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
A couple of things...

Having someone under house arrest does place some burden on the system. The person does have to be monitored, and officers dispatched if there appears to be a violation.

As well, it seems this fellow is an alcoholic. I wonder about treatment for him. If he's defiant about it, then it's a waste of time, of course. However, if doesn't make some personal changes, we might as well lock him up now, and not bother with the agreement suggested above. It won't last for long.

[ 09 January 2004: Message edited by: paxamillion ]


From: the process of recovery | Registered: Jul 2002  |  IP: Logged
Mr. Magoo
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posted 09 January 2004 01:48 PM      Profile for Mr. Magoo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Having someone under house arrest does place some burden on the system. The person does have to be monitored, and officers dispatched if there appears to be a violation.

Certainly some cost, but far less than the cost of also feeding and housing him. House arrest would also dispose of any arguments that he's going to turn into a serial rapist if he does time in the big house.

And as far as dispatching someone if he violates house arrest, that should only ever have to be done once. Spending his sentence in his own home, with his family, should be regarded as a privelege, and if he wants to trade that for a lifetime in prison then that should be his choice to make.

quote:
However, if doesn't make some personal changes, we might as well lock him up now, and not bother with the agreement suggested above. It won't last for long.

Probably not. But part of freedom is the freedom to do stupid things that aren't in your long term best interest. I just think it's time we stopped pretending that people aren't responsible for their own behaviour, and time we stopped shouldering that responsibility for them.

What's this community supposed to do now that they've been warned? Tell their kids they can't play outside? Worry every time they hear a screech? Why should he and his inability to control himself be their responsibility?


From: ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø, | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
Gentlebreeze
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posted 09 January 2004 02:19 PM      Profile for Gentlebreeze     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
From what was said, it seems the warning was more of a plea for help from the community. This way it was hoped that if he was seen purchasing alcohol, sitting in a pub, or trying to drive, someone would call the police.
From: Thornhill | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged
DrConway
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posted 09 January 2004 03:25 PM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Society doesn't treat vehicular offences with the seriousness that it should. Drunk driving offences, for example, are only recently being treated with the alacrity and seriousness that they should have been given years ago. I have often remarked that the leniency granted drunk drivers who kill people must tempt some really devious folks into liquoring up, and whacking their enemy with a car, accidentally on purpose. At trial, deny everything, and walk off with 5 years' prison.

Getting drunk and then whacking someone with a gun would get you second-degree murder, which is 15 years before parole is even considered.

I'm with lagatta on the fundamental dangerousness of cars and trucks - after all, I own a 4500 pound battleship, for pete's sake - and I would submit that a three-strikes-you're-out law permanently denying a drivers' licence to someone who has had major traffic convictions would actually help here, by forcing the bad drivers onto public transit where they can't hurt anyone except their own ears with their blathering about the gol-darned guv mint takin' away a man's freedom, or some damn thing.

Driving a vehicle is a privilege, not a right, and more people need to be reminded of this.


From: You shall not side with the great against the powerless. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
paxamillion
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posted 09 January 2004 03:59 PM      Profile for paxamillion   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Drunk driving offences, for example, are only recently being treated with the alacrity and seriousness that they should have been given years ago.

Agreed, Doctor.


From: the process of recovery | Registered: Jul 2002  |  IP: Logged

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