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Author Topic: BEEF
arborman
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Babbler # 4372

posted 08 January 2004 09:23 PM      Profile for arborman     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Haven't seen this anywhere.

Globe article on beef

"Prof. Westaway's plea for more testing has gone unanswered for three years. No one from the Canadian Food and Inspection Agency has ever called him about the issue. Nor has anyone investigated why Alberta's animal-disease surveillance system, one of the best in North America, was drastically downsized after an imported cow from England with BSE was discovered in 1993.

There may be a bigger public-health concern out there. In 1989, Laura Manuelidis and colleagues at Yale University performed autopsies on the brains of Alzheimer's patients and found that 13 per cent of the patients actually suffered from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease -- the human form of mad cow.

A University of Pittsburg study made similar findings. Until then, most scientists assumed that CJD only occurred in one in a million people. What the results could well mean is that "at least some people diagnosed with Alzheimer's have CJD," says Ms. Manuelidis. Instead of the official caseload of approximately 30 CJD cases a year, Canada, which has 364,000 cases of Alzheimer's and related dementias, just might already have much higher numbers of CJD.

Suddenly I don't feel like a burger.


From: I'm a solipsist - isn't everyone? | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
Pimji
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 228

posted 08 January 2004 09:44 PM      Profile for Pimji   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Not to mention the awry of other health and environmental problems that we already know about from eating the cow. I too am having second thoughts on my burger consumption. Not so much for the BSE thing but for the fact that I’ve actually begun to think about what I’m doing to my system.

I used to like a nice rare steak, light the cow on fire and rip strips of meat off it as its running by. I’m not so sure I can look at the BBQ or my weekly Friday night stop at Harvey’s in the same way anymore.


From: South of Ottawa | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
banquo
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Babbler # 2124

posted 08 January 2004 09:46 PM      Profile for banquo     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Does anyone have any hard information about so-called "spontaneous BSE"? All I can find are indefinite references.
From: north vancouver, bc | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
redshift
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posted 08 January 2004 11:43 PM      Profile for redshift     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
i think you're referring to "sporadic" CJD.
Here's some info that won't make you feel any better.
http://www.rense.com/general47/spor.htm

"Several studies, including the one by Manuelidis, have found autopsies reveal 3-percent-to-13-percent of patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's or dementia actually suffered from CJD. Those numbers might sound low, but there are 4-million Alzheimer's cases and hundreds of thousands of dementia cases in the United States. A small percentage of those cases could add up to 120,000 or more CJD victims going undetected and not included in official statistics."

[ 08 January 2004: Message edited by: redshift ]


From: cranbrook,bc | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
banquo
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posted 09 January 2004 12:06 AM      Profile for banquo     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Rense. Well, it must be true.

Spontaneous and sporadic are interchangeable terms for the same thing.

From
http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs113/en/

"Speculation as to the cause of the appearance of the agent causing the disease has ranged from spontaneous occurrence in cattle, the carcasses of which then entered the cattle food chain, to entry into the cattle food chain from the carcasses of sheep with a similar disease, scrapie."

"The nature of the BSE agent is still a matter of debate. According to the prion theory, the agent is composed largely, if not entirely, of a self-replicating protein, referred to as a prion. Another theory argues that the agent is virus-like and possesses nucleic acids which carry genetic information. Strong evidence collected over the past decade supports the prion theory, but the ability of the BSE agent to form multiple strains is more easily explained by a virus-like agent."

The interesting questions remain - if the disease occurs spontaneoulsy and is then transmitted by the diseased cattle being used in feeds, how does it occur spontaneously and how could we tell the difference between spontaneous occurrences and feed-caused? And how on earth might a self-replicating protein have evolved?


From: north vancouver, bc | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
redshift
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posted 09 January 2004 12:29 AM      Profile for redshift     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
some one else connecting the dots. industrial farming is gonna be the hard answer as to how the mutagenic prions are reinforced within the population.cows in fields don't eat cows.
http://www.freewebs.com/darkonsb/bse.html

From: cranbrook,bc | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
redshift
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posted 09 January 2004 01:02 AM      Profile for redshift     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
how did it evolve? through a mutagenic response to pervasive exposure to a pesticide like malathion, which ,interestingly reacts on exactly the same chemical (acetylcholinesterase)in pests that is related to CJD, alzheimers and assorted other neuro-degenerative diseases in people.Handy sharing all that DNA, isn't it?
they even feed the stuff to cattle for parasite control, and it may well cause spontaneous outbreaks, from some of the cluster patterns.

From: cranbrook,bc | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
arborman
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posted 09 January 2004 01:09 AM      Profile for arborman     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I don't think self replicating proteins would be anything new. Relatively new to our knowledge, perhaps, but not new to the world.

I gather that prion related diseases were commonplace in cultures that practiced some form of cannibalism (i.e. some in the South Pacific and elsewhere).

The problem arises when it isn't Bessie the old milk cow you are eating, but a number from an unimaginably large complex of factory farms and feedlots. You may be eating bits of hundreds of different cows that have been mushed together in various processing methods.

Until a few years ago, those cows were also eating recycled bits of all the other cows as well.

Any communicable disease that is difficult to detect, and passes through a food chain as mixed up as that of the modern industrial farming system, will be a potential source of VERY big problems.

The cattle industry opposing testing at every step of the way hasn't helped either. I believe the quote is 'Don't look, don't find.' Not a great approach to population health, but it works for marketing, at least for awhile.


From: I'm a solipsist - isn't everyone? | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
Trinitty
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posted 11 January 2004 08:03 PM      Profile for Trinitty     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Until a few years ago, those cows were also eating recycled bits of all the other cows as well.

And they still are. The level of enforcement on feed amounts to the bags of ground up cows being stamped with "Not to be fed to Ruminants". All it takes is one feedlot to break the rules and spread it further.

Folks, just don't eat it. I stopped three years ago and I'm hoping they're wrong about that really long incubation period.

I was really dissatisfied with the Cross Country Check-Up that was aired tonight. All they talked about was how to help the industry and get those borders opened.... nary a word about public health, only to say that the risk is very minute... a totally groundless statement. That's what was said in GB too.

100% testing and a total ban on feeding animals to herbivores is the only solution.


From: Europa | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged

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