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Author Topic: Useless Fact Question
Trisha
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 387

posted 12 August 2002 08:41 PM      Profile for Trisha     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Why don't you ever see cashews sold in the shell?
From: Thunder Bay, Ontario | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
scrabble
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2883

posted 12 August 2002 08:49 PM      Profile for scrabble     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
See illustration(s) and description here.

The knobby whats-it poking out of the bottom of the pear-shaped fruit-like thing is the cashew.

This also explains why it's so d*mn expensive.

edited in confusion: Well, I'll be darned. I was taught that they DIDN'T come in a shell, but looks like they do.

Here's a nice site that explains why - the hard covering on the knobby containing the cashew is poisonous. That'd be bad for business, I guess.

quote:
Cashews are a product loved by the wealthy nations and provided for by the poor nations.

[...]

The gray/brown cashew nut hangs like a nose at the end of the cashew apple. The nut shell is 1-1/2 inches long and kidney shaped. The nut is found on the end closest to the cashew apple. The other end is honeycombed with cells. These cells contain a toxic resinous fluid called cardol that blisters the mouth. For many years, the cashew was referred to as the blister nut.

Processing the Cashew Kernel

[...]

The older method is to roast the whole nut in shallow pans over an open charcoal fire with constant agitation. The process was used in native marketplaces and was dangerous and disagreeable. Shells burst, spurting the caustic fluid and releasing clouds of acrid fumes which blistered the skin. At the same time, the heat caused the caustic fluid to dissipate.


[ August 12, 2002: Message edited by: scrabble ]


From: dappled shade in the forest | Registered: Jul 2002  |  IP: Logged
Terry Johnson
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1006

posted 13 August 2002 12:31 AM      Profile for Terry Johnson     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The things you learn when you didn't even know you didn't know them...
From: Vancouver | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Arch Stanton
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2356

posted 13 August 2002 03:00 AM      Profile for Arch Stanton     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The cashew issue reminds be of something else that hs been bugging me for a few years.

The French sell a wide variety of vegetables in their grocery stores. However only one, the beetroot, is cooked before being sold.

I was told that this is for convenience. Can anyone explain further - if convenience is the real reason - why isn't all food sold in French grocery stores cooked before being sold?


From: Borrioboola-Gha | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
Trisha
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 387

posted 13 August 2002 03:13 AM      Profile for Trisha     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Congratulations, Scrabble, I'm surprised somebody got that so easily. I'll have to find harder questions.
From: Thunder Bay, Ontario | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 13 August 2002 10:37 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
why isn't all food sold in French grocery stores cooked before being sold?

Maybe because most food, once cooked, is at its peak of tastiness and texture for only a very very short time, whereas (I take it the French think) cooked beets keep well for some time and are more or less unaffected in taste and texture by being reheated.

I think there's a very slight advantage in eating beets fresh cooked, but I'd mostly agree -- they survive reheating, even canning, remarkably well.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 13 August 2002 10:38 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
PS: I didn't know that about the French and beets. It seems oddly unFrench, oddly unsubtle of them.
From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 13 August 2002 10:39 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
PPS: Maybe it's because they think of the beet as an English vegetable, in which case they would conclude that it doesn't matter what you do to it.
From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 13 August 2002 12:43 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Ha! They would probably have a point. After all, English food does have the reputation of everything being boiled until it's grey.

That's the problem with online trivia games like this. It's almost impossible to come up with a question whose answer is not on the internet somewhere and easy to pull up with a few good keywords on google.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
clockwork
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Babbler # 690

posted 13 August 2002 03:04 PM      Profile for clockwork     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I think there's a very slight advantage in eating beets fresh cooked, but I'd mostly agree -- they survive reheating, even canning, remarkably well.

The only beets I've ever eaten are pickled beets. I really couldn't tell if they were freshly pickled or had been pickled for some time.


From: Pokaroo! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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Babbler # 478

posted 13 August 2002 04:18 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 

Fresh is not pickled, clock. Eat them with butter: heaven. I will bring you some.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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Babbler # 1064

posted 13 August 2002 04:28 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Beets. Harumph. Here you bang up against the last surviving remnant of my few food dislikes as a child, skdadl. I'll eat beets in two forms only, both shredded: in borscht, or fresh, in salad.
From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
scrabble
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2883

posted 13 August 2002 05:48 PM      Profile for scrabble     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
why isn't all food sold in French grocery stores cooked before being sold?

Arch Stanton, should not the question be, rather: what is it that they do in Paris that makes all the food so ambrosial (yes, even the beets)?

Or even perhaps: why do Parisian grocers get the screaming meemees if you so much as place a finger on an apple?

[ August 13, 2002: Message edited by: scrabble ]


From: dappled shade in the forest | Registered: Jul 2002  |  IP: Logged

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