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Author Topic: Thought SARS Is Bad? You DON'T Wanna Come Across This!
glennB
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3993

posted 08 May 2003 07:42 PM      Profile for glennB     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
What happens is, the female phorid fly swoops in on a fire ant and, in less than a tenth of a second, injects an egg into the ant's midsection. When the egg hatches, the maggot crawls up inside the ant, and -- here is the good part -- eats the entire contents of the ant's head. This poses a serious medical problem for the ant...

Full Article

(If you can, watch the movies link. It is UNBELIEVABLE! )

Is nature one cruel Mother? Does any human action even compare to this? {shudder}

Or is someone out there going to claim to see some sort of "beauty" in this?

G.

[ 08 May 2003: Message edited by: glennB ]


From: Canada | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged
Gir Draxon
leftist-rightie and rightist-leftie
Babbler # 3804

posted 08 May 2003 07:57 PM      Profile for Gir Draxon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"Curbing" someone is pretty gross...
From: Arkham Asylum | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
SamL
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2199

posted 08 May 2003 10:33 PM      Profile for SamL     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Link doesn't work, though it calls to mind certain strains of tomato, which, when chewed upon by the tomato hornworn(the volicitin in the saliva stimulates the response), will send out chemical signals that attract parasitic wasps. These wasps lay their eggs in the caterpillar, and when the larvae hatch: presto! Instant caterpillar breakfast!

What other disguting (and slightly cool) things have I learned about in AP Bio this year, that show that mother Nature is very often a cruel Mother:

The antennapedia gene. Mutations in developmental gene sequences in fruit flies cause legs to grow ou of the head where the antenna should be. Big, gross, SEM photos in textbook. [Eugh]

Elephantiasis, where a parasitic worm blocks the lymph vessels of the affected area. Massive and disgusting swelling. Big eww...

And probably at the top of my disgusting list..... pinworms. Tiny parasitic intestinal worms that infect humans. They enter the body by being ingested through the mouth, they live in the intestine, and they lay their eggs just outside the anus.....
How they're ingested into the mouth again....? *vomit smiley*
The book says something about sleep, and scratching. *big vomit smiley*

And some things that humans have done:

Knockout mice..... I see the scientific necessity, but there's something not right about engineering a mouse to have a debilitating genetic defect.

Nothing's perfect, not even nature...


From: Cambridge, MA | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
clersal
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 370

posted 08 May 2003 11:12 PM      Profile for clersal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
SamL you will probably like this book: Pest Control by Bill Fitzhugh. Very funny book. He had me hunting in my insect book. Really, well worth the read.
From: Canton Marchand, Québec | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
TommyPaineatWork
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posted 09 May 2003 01:38 AM      Profile for TommyPaineatWork     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I remember a big thick book in our tiny elementary school library, it was easily the most thumbed through book in it.

I still remember the title: "Animals Without Backbones."

It had pictures of liver flukes in an autopsied human liver; a picture of a man with elephantitis in his leg; close ups of tape worm heads with the sinister hook teeth, gigantic Australian earthworms, etc, etc.

It is the real stuff of horror.

The symbol for medicine, the Caduses (sp?) probably has it's roots in parasitic worm removal.

There's a long, thin parasitic worm one gets infected with through contaminated water. Removal of the worm in ancient days involved getting enough of the head (like a mosquito larva, it needs access to the air to breath) and wrapping it around a stick. By turning the stick, the worm can be drawn out of it's subutaneous environment.

The proceedure had to be done with great care. If the worm broke, the part that remained under the skin would inducea life threatening infection.

Given that snakes were considered worms in those days, it's not hard to suppose that the snake we see wrapped around the stick in the medical symbol harkens back to those days, and that proceedure.

Not all such things are negative. There are instances of people lost in the wilderness saved from gangrene due to maggots eating the infected flesh, and of course leeches are used to speed healing and reduce scaring in some surgeries.


And no, "Animals Without Backbones" didn't have any pictures of David Frum.


From: London | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
kuba walda
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Babbler # 3134

posted 09 May 2003 12:47 PM      Profile for kuba walda        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I think I'll just forego breakfast today. Thanks anyhow.
From: the garden | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
SamL
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2199

posted 09 May 2003 02:16 PM      Profile for SamL     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
a picture of a man with elephantitis in his leg

My book has one of those..... yuck.

And the guy is from sub-Saharan Africa and looks fairly malnourished; you look at his 'normal' leg, and compare it with the infected one.... ewwww!

I could live with the big swelling, but not with the little swell-balls!


From: Cambridge, MA | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
SamL
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2199

posted 12 May 2003 08:27 PM      Profile for SamL     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Edited (well.... double posted) to add something of interest in the field of weight-loss research and knockout mice.

While studying for a recent exam, I looked in my Bio textbook, started studying hormones, and cam across leptin, which is a chemical produced by fat cells that act to inform the brain that there are fat reserves present. There was a picture of a normal mouse next to a knockout mouse engineered to lack the gene for leptin. Or, I should say: a normal mouse next to the frigging Death Star covered in white fur.

I really don't like the idea of knockout mice... *urgh*


From: Cambridge, MA | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged

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