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Author Topic: NDP priorities don't include childcare?
rasmus
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posted 31 March 2006 10:53 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
From the newest eNDP:

quote:
Parliament re-opens Monday, and the new NDP caucus are ready to go. We’ll be fighting to move forward on our working families agenda while ensuring Canada does not move backward on key issues.

The Liberals say they’ll oppose everything — they say they don’t have to work with anyone. People expect better from their minority Parliament, and New Democrats will deliver the principled opposition Canadians deserve.

In this session, NDP MPs will be fighting to put working families first by working to:

* Strengthen public health care.
* Ensure care for seniors and opportunities for young people.
* Provide economic security for families and communities.
* Protect the environment.
* Deliver real change for Aboriginal people.
* Introduce electoral reform.

And don’t forget e.NDP will keep you up-to-date each and every week.


We're about to lose the first new national social program of a generation, and fighting for it is not an NDP priority? The majority of provinces, the other opposition parties, and most Canadians are onside. If the NDP can't take a stand under these conditions, when can we count on them to take a stand?

[ 03 April 2006: Message edited by: rasmus raven ]


From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Bookish Agrarian
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posted 31 March 2006 11:12 PM      Profile for Bookish Agrarian   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
That's right the NDP is now anti-childcare A little further down there is a quote about childcare from the Globe and Mail. This signals that it is a top of mind issue. It's a freakin newsletter.
It also doesn't include a mention of a major Conservaive broken promise to Canada's farm community around the CAIS program. But I expect the NDP will make mention of it where it counts, and guess what that's not a newsletter.

[ 31 March 2006: Message edited by: Bookish Agrarian ]


From: Home of this year's IPM | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
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posted 31 March 2006 11:28 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Uh, please don't misconstrue me. I didn't say they were anti-childcare. I said it wasn't a priority, as reflected in the list of priorities put out by the caucus staff on the eve of Parliament. There will also be an event in Ottawa in Sunday where Jack will outline the NDP's parliamentary agenda.

This issue is one where Harper is weakest. Yet the NDP has taken a very cautious approach to it since the election, and this list is just
one more piece of evidence to confirm that assessment.


From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Jonas
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posted 01 April 2006 03:37 AM      Profile for Jonas     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
If you go to ndp.ca Childcare is the most prominent issue on the page.
From: Ottawa | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged
Scott Piatkowski
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posted 01 April 2006 03:46 AM      Profile for Scott Piatkowski   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I agree that it's an odd omission. But, I also agree that it's hardly an indication that the NDP is going to ignore the issue. Jack would have to deal with Olivia if that were the case
From: Kitchener-Waterloo | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
TCD
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posted 01 April 2006 10:36 AM      Profile for TCD     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
It's one of two things:

- Either the author of ENDP felt that childcare fit within one of their vague priorites: "opportunities for young people" "economic security for families"

- The NDP is wary about participating in the deification of the old - and deeply flawed - Liberal plan.

I appreciate the logic of the latter. One of my pet peeves is the way that childcare lobbyists have by-and-large offered an unconditional defense of the Liberal plan - and have refused to examine the shortcomings which Harper was so able to exploit. And, by extension, allow the Libs to paint themselves as heroes.

That noted, I hope this isn't the reason. I suspect the childcare debate will be like the free trade debate. Whether the NDP chooses to or not we'll be forced to engage on the issue. Best to be in front of it - I couldn't stand another decade of ponderous Rick Salutin columns about how the NDP didn't stand for his principles.

[ 01 April 2006: Message edited by: TCD ]


From: Toronto | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
meades
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posted 01 April 2006 12:06 PM      Profile for meades     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
If the NDP thinks childcare "fits nicely" into "economic security for families," it says a lot about the vision vaccuum going on at the top of the party.

Childcare is absolutely essential for creating a woman-friendly economy. The party, just like all the other parties, is catering to the dominant view across the country that childcare is something that just affects parents. It's generally seen as a "special interest" when it isn't being co-opted by Conservatives as a "family values" cause.

And Jack and the party strategists seem to just sit there, and say "Oh gee, well if that's what everyone thinks, it seems we better get on that bandwagon too!" So we hear all the baloney about Working Families. How about single moms? What about a pregnant teen that decided to keep the baby? I know the response to this will be "The NDP thinks all those groups are families!"

Which is a lie.

If they really did think that (or care), they'd make it perfectly clear, which they have not.

Childcare is more than just about setting up child care centres (though they are very, very important). It's about better maternity and parental benefits, and increasing the EI premiums for these benefits much closer to 100%. It's about providing enough support for parents who do choose to stay home. It's about ensuring childcare is available 24 hours a day. It's about ensuring all children start off with a healthy diet, and catering to the dietary wishes of parents as well (vegan and vegetarian options should be available both in childcare centres, as well as all levels of shool, from Kindergarten to doctoral degrees). And it's about safe, secure, easily accessible abortion.

We all seem to forget that absolutely every person in this country came out of someone else, and wasn't born 5'8" with facial hair and a suit. A national childcare strategy is just as, if not more important than our national health care. The broader support we give to people in their first years of development, the healthier our society will be, parents and caregivers will be less stressed, and they'll feel more empowered with a number of options available to them.

The lack of these systems of support has played a significant role in the continued unsettlingly high wage gap between men and women, as well as reinforcing the systemic marginalization of women, and male dominance (for instance, a woman who has ever had a child will generally earn less than a woman who hasn't. Meanwhile, a man who has ever had a child will earn more than a man who hasn't!).

Child care centres aren't a vision. "Economic security for families" isn't a vision. I'm kind of surprised the NDP (strategists and the leadership, I mean. Not the caucus, who I think are doing an amazing job) really doesn't seem to get this. I really expected more attention than a "Big Tile" on ndp.ca. I guess we'll see, though.


From: Sault Ste. Marie | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
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posted 01 April 2006 12:26 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
meades, I hate the term "working families" as well, but I do think most people nowadays would agree that a single parent raising a child or children certainly counts as a family.
From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Marg Bedore
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posted 01 April 2006 02:22 PM      Profile for Marg Bedore     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Layton's strategy is to take seats from the Liberals not opppose Harper. He is the great opportunist.
From: Kingston | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Webgear
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posted 01 April 2006 02:29 PM      Profile for Webgear     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
What happen with Sudan? Before the elections, the NDP talked a lot about the situation in Sudan, however now there is no talk about the growing problems in Sudan.
From: Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged
tommie
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posted 01 April 2006 03:10 PM      Profile for tommie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Marg Bedore:
Layton's strategy is to take seats from the Liberals not opppose Harper. He is the great opportunist.

Exactly. It was the Liberals who introduced the national public childcare plan. No doubt the strategy professionals at NDP HQ realize that working towards the implementation of the childcare plan and opposing Harper's regressive $1200 scheme will boost Liberal numbers, not NDP numbers. It's another tragic example of the NDP putting the NDP before progressive ideals.


From: Canada? | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged
TCD
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posted 01 April 2006 06:14 PM      Profile for TCD     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Right, tommie.

And it wasn't opportunistic to promise childcare in 1993, 1997 and 2000 and refuse to deliver it.

And it wasn't opportunistic to promise a national program with standards and then just write blank cheques to the provinces.

And it wasn't opportunistic to deliver this moments before an election where the Liberals were finally caught engaged in massive corruption.

I think we can all avoid taking lessons in opportunism from you and shit-weasels like Gerard Kennedy.

[ 01 April 2006: Message edited by: TCD ]


From: Toronto | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
Stunned Wind
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posted 01 April 2006 07:26 PM      Profile for Stunned Wind     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by meades:
. . . Childcare is more than just about setting up child care centres (though they are very, very important). . .
I'm very pleased to see this sort of comment. The debate about childcare has seemed to centre entirely around day-care centres as if that somehow solves all the problems.

It is much greater than this - child-care is central to our society and our society's survival. But, instead, our governments seem to treat children as simply an expensive hobby that some people take up. Not much of a vision.


From: Well! Now I'm in Victoria-Swan Lake! | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
Gir Draxon
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posted 01 April 2006 07:40 PM      Profile for Gir Draxon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Scott Piatkowski:
I agree that it's an odd omission. But, I also agree that it's hardly an indication that the NDP is going to ignore the issue.

I'd have to agree with you, no matter how much it disappoints me.


From: Arkham Asylum | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
tommie
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posted 01 April 2006 09:04 PM      Profile for tommie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by TCD:
Right, tommie.

And it wasn't opportunistic to promise childcare in 1993, 1997 and 2000 and refuse to deliver it.

And it wasn't opportunistic to promise a national program with standards and then just write blank cheques to the provinces.

And it wasn't opportunistic to deliver this moments before an election where the Liberals were finally caught engaged in massive corruption.

I think we can all avoid taking lessons in opportunism from you and shit-weasels like Gerard Kennedy.

[ 01 April 2006: Message edited by: TCD ]


Cool! I'm glad the best remarks you can make to defend the NDP are to attack the Liberal party. Which, despite having taken awhile to achieve it, did in fact implement childcare. The NDP didn't.

I also have no idea what Gerard Kennedy has to do with this discussion. But, I'm glad you brought him up, because Kennedy has done more for education in Ontario than the Rae-NDP regime ever dreamed of doing.


From: Canada? | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged
aka Mycroft
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posted 01 April 2006 09:43 PM      Profile for aka Mycroft     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by tommie:


I also have no idea what Gerard Kennedy has to do with this discussion. But, I'm glad you brought him up, because Kennedy has done more for education in Ontario than the Rae-NDP regime ever dreamed of doing.


I realised the other day that while everyone seems to be saying that Kennedy is doing a great job for education no one seems to be able to name anything he's actually done.


From: Toronto | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
Scott Piatkowski
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posted 01 April 2006 09:56 PM      Profile for Scott Piatkowski   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
This is the main graphic at ndp.ca


From: Kitchener-Waterloo | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
ouroboros
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posted 01 April 2006 10:38 PM      Profile for ouroboros     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by rasmus raven:
We're about to lose the first new national social program of a generation, and fighting for it is not an NDP priority? The majority of provinces, the other opposition parties, and most Canadians are onside. If the NDP can't take a stand under these conditions, when can we count on them to take a stand?

Jack spoke at Federal Council today and I'm pretty sure he talked about child care being a priority. Although to be truthful I wasn't paying 100 % attention. Maybe someone who was there and paying better attention could confirm this.


From: Ottawa | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged
Hunky_Monkey
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posted 01 April 2006 11:20 PM      Profile for Hunky_Monkey     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by tommie:
Cool! I'm glad the best remarks you can make to defend the NDP are to attack the Liberal party. Which, despite having taken awhile to achieve it, did in fact implement childcare. The NDP didn't.

Implement childcare? They throw a few billion dollars to the provinces and that becomes a new social program?!?!


From: Halifax | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
ggs
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posted 01 April 2006 11:51 PM      Profile for ggs        Edit/Delete Post
How about the Conservative one.

A single mother earning $30,000/year will receive $1,200/year for child care (all taxable). So after taxes, thats about $800.

A double income family earning $500,000/year will receive $1,200/year for child-care. After taxes that's about $600.

So, the parent earning 30-grand will get what, maybe $200/year (about $18/month) more than the family earning half a mill.

That's sure an effective use of public money.


From: Ontario | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged
sgm
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posted 01 April 2006 11:58 PM      Profile for sgm     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
And when you click on the featured graphic Scott P has posted above, you find the following information:
quote:
Our children’s early years are a foundation for lifelong learning. Quality child care offers kids a head-start and makes life easier for parents who work or study.

It’s a travesty that a Liberal government with a 12-year mandate failed to establish the national child care program they promised in 1993. They took first steps only when they had a minority last year, with plenty of NDP pressure — but even that’s vulnerable now.

This election, the Conservatives opposed the funding arrangements with provinces to create child care spaces. But Stephen Harper leads a minority government and will need to compromise. Mr. Harper plans to introduce a per-child payment that would cover a small fraction of families' costs for private child care. What this won't address is the critical shortage of affordable, quality child care spaces and it won’t provide working families with choice.

Last year, after 12 years of Liberal dithering, Ottawa began to sign deals with provinces to start creating new spaces. In total only three contracts with provinces were signed, but the NDP will press the Conservatives to continue and strengthen the modest steps made in the last minority parliament, including stable long term funding for licensed child care spaces.

The NDP will also introduce a National Child Care Act to lay a sturdy foundation for child care. This legislation would ensure two-way accountability — stable federal funding in return for provincial commitments to fund high-quality, non-profit centres. That’s the critical step the Liberals neglected when they inked child care deals. They wouldn’t pass legislation to ensure a sustainable program, and that’s left child care vulnerable.

This session, NDP Child Care Critic Olivia Chow (Trinity-Spadina) is leading the effort to build this more lasting foundation for national child care – and you can help. Check out the links below to learn more and take action.


There follows a series of links:


From: I have welcomed the dawn from the fields of Saskatchewan | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
tommie
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posted 02 April 2006 12:00 AM      Profile for tommie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by aka Mycroft:

I realised the other day that while everyone seems to be saying that Kennedy is doing a great job for education no one seems to be able to name anything he's actually done.


From Wikipedia:


He was appointed Minister of Education on October 23, 2003. Under previous governments, the Education portfolio had been marked by considerable labour strife. [u]In 1993 the NDP government introduced mandatory days off without pay.[/u] In 1995, Mike Harris's first Minister of Education, John Snobelen, told an audience he would "create a crisis" in public education in order to implement an unpopular restructuring package. There were province-wide teachers's strikes in 1996 and 1998, and many boards experienced work-to-rule campaigns that reduced extra-curricular activities.

In the spring of 2005, Kennedy announced the establishment of a provincial framework in teacher's negotiations, which would see teacher's salaries increase by approximately 10.5% over four years in exchange for four years of labour peace. The framework includes priorities such as workplace preparation courses and English as a Second Language programs.

Kennedy is very popular with Ontario's teachers union. Additionally, prior to his work in government he was the CEO of the Toronto food bank and rank the organization brilliantly, feeding countless hungry families. He's spent his life working for those in need and to make a better world. Too bad the Dippers consider him a "fucking weasel" just because he's red instead of orange.


From: Canada? | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged
aka Mycroft
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posted 02 April 2006 12:11 AM      Profile for aka Mycroft     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Ok, so teachers salaries have gone up 10%. That's a good development but is that really all he's done of note?
From: Toronto | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
Scott Piatkowski
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posted 02 April 2006 12:14 AM      Profile for Scott Piatkowski   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
To me, it sure looks like Kennedy's staff is spending their valuable time pasting Liberal press releases into wikipedia.
From: Kitchener-Waterloo | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
Fidel
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posted 02 April 2006 03:11 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Hey look, NDP priorities apparently don't include boiled rutabagas in every pot either. What do they say about absence of proof not being proof of absence?. Have the NDP become advocates for stay at home parenting and little red school houses ?.
From: Viva La Revolución | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
TCD
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posted 02 April 2006 03:25 PM      Profile for TCD     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by tommie:
Too bad the Dippers consider him a "fucking weasel" just because he's red instead of orange.
Please! I said "shit weasel" - not "fucking weasel".

From: Toronto | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
Fidel
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posted 02 April 2006 05:35 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by rasmus raven:
If the NDP can't take a stand under these conditions, when can we count on them to take a stand?

All MP's will have their day to vote with the NDP on these and other long-time NDP issues.

[ 03 April 2006: Message edited by: Fidel ]


From: Viva La Revolución | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
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posted 02 April 2006 06:04 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Don't assume that I based my post here exclusively on the information I mentioned; don't assume that I am unaware that I could be wrong, or that the game can change at any time. Every thing goes into the mix.

At any rate, the signal coming out of Layton's speech today was significantly better, although it is still unclear how it will be operationalized (some of the strategies talked about so far sound more like posturing than genuine political strategies designed to win). The real test of the commitment will be what the NDP is willing to put on the line to save it. There is an obvious tactic that has a good chance of winning, but Harper has been working hard to block it by making a side-deal with Quebec.

quote:
OTTAWA -- NDP Leader Jack Layton says he'll work issue by issue in the coming minority Parliament.

But Layton told the NDP federal council in Ottawa this morning that his party will not compromise on issues like public health care and child care.

Child care will be contentious -- the Conservatives have promised to end a Liberal deal with the provinces and implement its own plan to give $1,200 a year directly to parents.


NDP to work issue by issue


national childcare preferred to cash payout: study


From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
cranford
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posted 03 April 2006 11:09 AM      Profile for cranford        Edit/Delete Post
Reading Layton's speech on the opening of Parliament which is available on the NDP website, I would say that child care looks like the number one substantive priority.
From: Here and there | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
Wilf Day
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posted 03 April 2006 01:19 PM      Profile for Wilf Day     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by cranford:
Reading Layton's speech on the opening of Parliament which is available on the NDP website, I would say that child care looks like the number one substantive priority.

Link. I agree.

From: Port Hope, Ontario | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
malcontent
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posted 03 April 2006 05:17 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
That speech was better than I expected, particularly on childcare. As I said above, it still remains to be seen what strategy they choose. In any case, if the Conservatives make a one-off with Quebec, it's going to be hard to stop them from killing all the other deals, unless the NDP or Liberals can mount a serious, aggressive, proactive campaign, such as there currently is no indication of, framing the issue before the Conservatives control it, and in a way that puts the Conservatives on the defensive (childcare -- it's about women's rights).

On the other hand, does the Bloc want to hammer in the nails on its own coffin by facilitating Conservative legitimacy in Quebec? Now might be the time for the Bloc to realize that acting in solidarity with other provinces on the childcare issue will do them better -- and get the same results for Quebec -- than a one-off deal. Of course, the Tories might be bundling other concessions in the offer.


From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged

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