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Author Topic: The EU
CPsPC
recent-rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4623

posted 19 November 2003 08:06 PM      Profile for CPsPC     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
A little about Denmark and Denmark/EU

Denmark is small country at the north end of mighty Germany. Denmark is one of the Scandinavian countries. The others are Sweden and Norway. The three countries have a lot of culture in common. We also understand each other languages if we make an effort to speak slowly and clearly.
Norway and Sweden have vast forests and mountain areas, particularly in the North, while Denmark is flat (highest point: about 160 metres!). We have a great variety of landscapes, though. 200 km or so of dunes to the east (at the shore of the North Sea). A small, rocky Island to the east, in the Baltic. At the Skaw in the North two oceans meet (The Baltic, at this point called the Kattegat, and the North Sea, Skagerrak).
In the South scores of small islands.
Largest city and capital of Denmark is Copenhagen with about 1.5 million inhabitants including the suburbs. Second largest is Århus in Jutland, the peninsula.

We have a parliamentary system with the Folketing with 179 seats that makes the laws and appoint the government and Prime Minister. The Parties are the extreme right wing, racist party, Party of Progress (!), two Conservative parties, a liberal party, Social Democrats, a Christian Peoples Party, SF (Socialist Peoples Part) which is a bit to the left of the Social Democrats, and finally the Unity List which is a left wing party, more or less revolutionary.
Right now the two Conservative parties who holds the majority in Parliament with the support of the Party of Progress form the government. This has already brought about a series of racist laws and laws attacking the working class and those that are dependent of supplementary benefits, the schools, hospitals etc. The same tune as in almost every country in the West.

We joined the EU in 1972 after a referendum that prescribed when Parliament passes laws that are designed to give away sovereignty. Since then we have had several referendums – the most important till now, because there was a No majority, was the about the Maastricht treaty.
There’s a strong No movement and in the population as a whole there’s widespread resistance to the EU and all its works; despite of the Yes side having to its disposal almost all the media (including TV), the majority of political parties, the Trade Unions etc. the Yes side can’t be sure to win the next, crucial, referendum concerning joining the Euro and the EMU (European Monetary Union).
There are two sides to the resistance to the EU. One side is the right wing (Represented by the Party of Progress), saying no out of nationalistic, populist racist reasons and the left wing part of which is revolutionary and want a red Europe. In between there are all kinds of nuances, of course. E.g. the liberal party that was against more EU at a time but now has turned 180 degrees because of a right wing leadership. Still many of the rank-and-file still vote No to more EU.

There’s a very important task ahead for the No side. If we vote yes to the Euro/EMU we have fallen into the trap, and there’s no returning. Sovereign Danish economic politics is a thing of the past.

To be continued

Carsten


From: Møllegade 10 | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
aRoused
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1962

posted 20 November 2003 06:31 AM      Profile for aRoused     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
One side is the right wing (Represented by the Party of Progress), saying no out of nationalistic, populist racist reasons and the left wing part of which is revolutionary and want a red Europe.

Given that you describe the Yes camp as the trade unions, and the majority of political parties, in my mind this description of the major opposition to the EU doesn't do your case much help. It sounds like the opposition to the EU is dominated by, frankly, fringe parties and causes.

But keep talking, I may come around.


From: The King's Royal Burgh of Eoforwich | Registered: Dec 2001  |  IP: Logged
Rufus Polson
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3308

posted 20 November 2003 03:30 PM      Profile for Rufus Polson     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
So if you vote no to the EMU, what would you get instead, an ostrich?
(Sorry, sorry, I've just been wanting to make that joke for a long time)

From: Caithnard College | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 20 November 2003 04:11 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Rufus, Rufus, Rufus... First Tommy_Paine, now you.

< bolshie-cockney labour-unionist >

Wot we've got here mate, see, is your classic problem of demarcation, see? Fwoah! Our contract clearly stytes, see, all punning and wordplay to be carried out by members of the International Bruvver'n'Sisterhood of Punsters, Wordplyers, 'n' Allied Trydes, see? You got a union card, then, "comrade"?

< bclu >

Thanks, Carsten, for the summary, though like aRoused, I'd like to hear more about reasons for voting No. Also: I thought Denmark had already voted No to monetary union a few years back? I take it the Yes supporters are confident they can win this time? Why might that be, simply because as you say they have many of the opinion-makers with them?

Edited to add:

quote:
We also understand each other languages if we make an effort to speak slowly and clearly.

Wotta coincidence. Rather like Canadians and Americans...

[ 20 November 2003: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
CPsPC
recent-rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4623

posted 25 November 2003 04:21 PM      Profile for CPsPC     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
To aRoused:

You're right in that the opposition to EU seems peripheral. This is only at first sight however. There has always been a vast resistance to the EU in the Danish population, but people don't necessarily vote for anti-EU parties at the general elections.

There are two movements that attracts the political middle of the anti-EU movement. Even Danish TV has recognized them as being in line with the political parties. E.g. they are always represented in the TV debates when there's going to be a referendum.

>Because of the Social Democrat leadership the Trade Unions have always been pro-EU.

Greetings
CPsPC


From: Møllegade 10 | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
CPsPC
recent-rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4623

posted 26 November 2003 09:13 PM      Profile for CPsPC     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
'lance, there are lots of reasons for voting No. But, isn't the total loss of democracy enough?

CPsPC


From: Møllegade 10 | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 26 November 2003 10:07 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Well, I can see where a monetary union involves some loss of sovereignty. I might vote against it for that reason, myself. (Certainly, whenever someone suggests Canada adopts the US dollar, I'm strongly opposed. The US is ten times our size in population, and many more than ten times our size in power and influence).

I don't see, though, how this means a "total loss of democracy." That, to me, seems a bit of a leap.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged

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