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Author Topic: Flogging a near-death horse
agent007
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1189

posted 05 November 2001 12:47 PM      Profile for agent007     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
What's "wrong" is that the NDP got whipped in three elections... So the new tactic will be to embrace every balaclava-wearing dissident group?

Here's Larry Solway, in his own words.

(NDP? NPI? Either way, it's a hopeless case.)


From: Niagara Falls ON | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Doug
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 44

posted 05 November 2001 12:50 PM      Profile for Doug   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
At least the balaclava-wearers can probably survive a day of canvassing, unlike many of the increasingly aging party membership.
From: Toronto, Canada | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 05 November 2001 12:52 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
burrrrrrrrrrrrrrn!
From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 05 November 2001 01:02 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I worship John Updike.

A question I keep forgetting to ask the NDippers who are still active:

Why, in all these discussions, does no one ever talk much about the riding associations? Vast overgeneralizations are continually being made about the unions, about splits within labour, about party-labour problems, and about the two sets of party reformers. Is it possible to talk about the general character/s of the riding assocs in each region these days?

I ask because it was a general impression of mine way back in the 70s that the Ontario riding assocs tended to be notably more "left" than either the labour heavies or the leadership, and that seemed not at all because of Waffle influence (although some few ridings had healthy dollops of Wafflers). It was certainly something Wafflers noticed then -- that we were getting a much more sympathetic hearing from ordinary rank-and-filers than anyone else.

Is this still true of some/any/most riding assocs in this or any other province?


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 05 November 2001 01:19 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
One of these days I'll have to join my NDP riding association and find out. It just seems so useless to do so in Kingston though - we're such a Liberal stronghold federally and provincially. And we always run the same NDP candidate who has lost what - 9 elections now? Well, that's probably an exaggeration...

[ November 05, 2001: Message edited by: Michelle ]


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
JCL
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1387

posted 05 November 2001 06:46 PM      Profile for JCL     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
It amuses me when some people on the left criticize other parties for saying their representatives are old dinosaurs with 17th century thinking and in between their lines say that the NDP is full of young, vibrant intelligent people? Hello!!!!! NDP is not a MTV/MuchMusic generation party. A number of NDP reps I see in the Commons is that half of them or a touch more are older than 50 years old. The other third is between 35 & 50 years old.
From: Winnipeg. 35 days to Christmas yet no snow here. | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
Dogbert
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1201

posted 06 November 2001 01:11 AM      Profile for Dogbert     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
The world is run by the 35-70 age group. Young people may not be jumping on the NDP bandwagon, but they're not exactly lining up for Reform/Alliance/DRC/whatever the rednecks are calling their party nowadays either. They're simply too bitter to bother with any of them.

And I believe the point of calling the right "old" is that their policies are straight from the 19th century. Victorian England with a Wal-Mart happy face. Which wouldn't be an issue if the right didn't keep insisting that our policies are out of date...

Dogbert


From: Elbonia | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
nonsuch
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1402

posted 06 November 2001 01:41 AM      Profile for nonsuch     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
The balaklavas were an unnecessary frill, but the man does have a point.
Why not forget about 'relevance' and 'freshness'? Formulate a clear, honest political vision, and stick to it? Then tell people and tell them and tell them again.

From: coming and going | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
WingNut
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1292

posted 06 November 2001 02:54 AM      Profile for WingNut   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I was too young to have been greatly aware of this, but I seem to recall that in the heyday of the NDP, in the 60's and 70's, their riding associations would have store fronts all year round and woould act as places for constituents to visit with grievances that they would then act upon. Like an senior with a pension problem would vist the riding office and someone there would investigate and attempt to get action.
Is this something from my imagination or did it really happen?

From: Out There | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
meades
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 625

posted 07 November 2001 12:12 AM      Profile for meades     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
It's still that way in my riding. Unfortunately, not as much CAN be done. Thank you, knifey Mike!
From: Sault Ste. Marie | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Doug
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 44

posted 07 November 2001 01:58 AM      Profile for Doug   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
The trouble with that approach is that you end up either duplicating existing community services or get accused of using people with difficulties for a political purpose. At any rate, if there were the resources to do that there would also be the resources for many more winning election campaigns, in which case we'd have constituency offices to do that sort of thing out of.
From: Toronto, Canada | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
JCL
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1387

posted 07 November 2001 06:54 PM      Profile for JCL     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Dogbert - Hate to say it but socialism had its day in the sun in the 20th century but isn't much of a political choice nowadays. Most countries seem to be voting for coalition governments or centrists governments or slightly left or right of center parties.
From: Winnipeg. 35 days to Christmas yet no snow here. | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
JonnyHaggis
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 651

posted 07 November 2001 08:00 PM      Profile for JonnyHaggis   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
So frustrating. These Larry Solway people just don't get it. WHy do they think NPI is just scrambling to attract 'special interests'. In a way he's right. The NDP's electoral failure is a rejection of it's policies (non participatory government) and they should just give up, and let the NPI take over.
From: Montreal | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged

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